Return to the Vegetable Gardening Forum | Post a Follow-Up

 o
Carrot Fertilizing Question.........

Posted by Handsome54 6a (My Page) on
Thu, Sep 27, 12 at 21:45

Started container carrots (on 8/7, Sweet Petite) for my first time & with what I've read, I'm probably using too much nitrogen (Jack's triple 20). Do they look like they're going to tops?


Photobucket


Follow-Up Postings:

 o
RE: Carrot Fertilizing Question.........

Yep. That - Jack's Triple 20 - is a lot of nitrogen. A lot P and K too for that matter. How often are you applying it and how?

Dave


 o
RE: Carrot Fertilizing Question.........

Too much Nitrogen usually causes Carrots to fork. Not sure it would cause it not to grow roots. If you fertilize where you are growing Carrots, it would be best to do it in the fall, and plant the Carrots in the Spring. Don't plant the Carrots in recently fertilized areas.

They probably also like soil that is not so friable. Not sure if that's true though. I planted carrots in a spot that was only slightly loose, and they grew huge. I haven't harvested them yet, but they are big.


 o
RE: Carrot Fertilizing Question.........

I tried container carrots this year and didn't have any luck. None of them grew to anywhere near full size. I've seen other people have more success with them in containers, but I won't bother next year - it would take too many seasons to get it right.

I doubt small roots are a nitrogen problem. I did have some hairy roots this year in my garden plot. I must have fertilized once too many times.


 o
RE: Carrot Fertilizing Question.........

It is the ratio of top to root in the photo that is the give away. Just like many other root vegetables (radishes, beets, turnips, etc.) excess N gives you big tops and little to no root.

But I do agree with stuffradio that timing of fertilizing is also important. No sooner than 6 weeks prior to planting and 8 weeks is better, then a light side dressing of a low N fert in mid-season.

Dave


 o
RE: Carrot Fertilizing Question.........

Too much nitrogen will give you big roots and big tops. It will also lower the sweetness of the roots. I know this is true for sugar beet. Grew them for 30 years. Too much nitrogen was the worst thing you could do. It made lots of impurities in the root which caused sugar to be tied up in molasses. Total sugar was reduced, extractable sugar was reduced even more, but root yield was increased by high nitrogen. We got paid by the ton based on extractable sugar.

I'm pretty sure carrots will respond the same as sugar beet. Use a moderate nitrogen rate early in the growing cycle. Then hope that the plants run out of nitrogen in late summer. Sugar will be highest in late fall and winter.


 o
RE: Carrot Fertilizing Question.........

@ Yep. That - Jack's Triple 20 - is a lot of nitrogen. A lot P and K too for that matter. How often are you applying it and how?

Dave

Been fertilizing about every three weeks using a watering can... Remember this is a container...


 o
RE: Carrot Fertilizing Question.........

I used Jack's 20 and mine did fine. I didn't fertilize a lot though. Half strength every month maybe.


 o
RE: Carrot Fertilizing Question.........

Been fertilizing about every three weeks using a watering can... Remember this is a container...

Are you using it in a diluted form as is usually recommended in containers? Containers need feeding more often true but it also concentrates the fertilizer in a confined space so using diluted feedings is usually recommended - 1/4 to 1/2 strength max. Cut the Jacks to 1/4 strength.

Dave


 o
RE: Carrot Fertilizing Question.........

Thanks Dave! Yeah, I've been using one tablespoon per gal of water....... Obviously need to cut that back to a 1/4 .............


 o
RE: Carrot Fertilizing Question.........

An infallible fertilizer application for carrots is the one used by Alan Chadwick in his many garden projects during the period from 1967 to 1980. After cultivating the soil, apply about 2" of well rotted cow manure and a light dusting of bone-meal. Work that into the soil to a depth of around 6" and then sow your carrots into that. You shouldn't need to fertilize again at all. Any amount of compost worked into the soil would help. It's so gentle and balanced that you wouldn't need to worry about too much top growth. The following link has some very useful information and photos.

Here is a link that might be useful: Alan-Chadwick.org


 o Post a Follow-Up

Please Note: Only registered members are able to post messages to this forum.

    If you are a member, please log in.

    If you aren't yet a member, join now!


Return to the Vegetable Gardening Forum

Information about Posting

  • You must be logged in to post a message. Once you are logged in, a posting window will appear at the bottom of the messages. If you are not a member, please register for an account.
  • Please review our Rules of Play before posting.
  • Posting is a two-step process. Once you have composed your message, you will be taken to the preview page. You will then have a chance to review your post, make changes and upload photos.
  • After posting your message, you may need to refresh the forum page in order to see it.
  • Before posting copyrighted material, please read about Copyright and Fair Use.
  • We have a strict no-advertising policy!
  • If you would like to practice posting or uploading photos, please visit our Test forum.
  • If you need assistance, please Contact Us and we will be happy to help.


Learn more about in-text links on this page here