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dry pesticide rates for hand held sprayers

Posted by michael357 5b, KS (My Page) on
Thu, Jan 23, 14 at 14:56

the link is from the U of KY and has a good deal of useful info. for folks using small amounts of spray materials but can't seem to figure out how to convert the label rates to rates usable in say, tsp/gal..

Hope this helps somebody.

Here is a link that might be useful: U of KY link


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: dry pesticide rates for hand held sprayers

Thanks Michael, that is useful. Bookmarked it.


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RE: dry pesticide rates for hand held sprayers

You're welcome H-man BTW: do you think all these wild temp. swings should cause one to delay dormant pruning apples to avoid injury to the wound sites? I'm just thinking the trees might be out of dormancy enough after a warm spell to have problems from pruning when it suddenly cools back off to zero and below.


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RE: dry pesticide rates for hand held sprayers

I do think you need to consider weather, but it is difficult to know how low temps need to be to represent threat in terms of "shake" wounds at pruning cuts. -25 F is the number I run with when working with mature apple trees but after that, with younger trees and other species, it's kind of a crap shoot. I haven't crapped out yet in my zone. Maybe there's better info out there now, been a while since I looked for it.

It is supposed to take about two weeks for wounds to harden up following pruning.

There are so many variables going on here, the numbers must be taken with a grain of salt.


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RE: dry pesticide rates for hand held sprayers

  • Posted by olpea zone 6 KS (My Page) on
    Sun, Jan 26, 14 at 11:03

I was sent this link in an email the other day. While it doesn't discuss the effect of pruning on wound sites, it does discuss the effect of pruning on hardiness.

Here is a link that might be useful: Effect of Pruning on Cold Hardiness of Fruit Trees


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RE: dry pesticide rates for hand held sprayers

Excellent article, Olpea although some statements seemed dubious to me.

"A mid-winter severe cold snap may not injure plants unless it is immediately followed by unseasonably mild conditions."

That statement leaves me a bit puzzled. I probably should reread what preceded it, but it seems it should be the other way around.

The suggestion that we "know" that fall pruned trees never achieve the same winter hardiness as trees not pruned seems like a stretch, based on the info provided- the evidence they referred to was only from peaches. They may have been basing it on other studies as well, however.

Around here, peaches are considered one of the most winter sensitive of fruit species widely grown and growers usually don't touch them until threat of severe cold is past.

i do know that there are Hudson Valley apple growers that send out their crews to prune immediately after picking and have done so for a very long time. It might be that it is very early fall where the problem lies or it may pertain only to certain varieties or only to other species or it isn't such a problem in Z5-6.

I stop pruning trees sometime around mid-Sept and don't start again till late Dec as a rule.


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RE: dry pesticide rates for hand held sprayers

  • Posted by olpea zone 6 KS (My Page) on
    Sun, Jan 26, 14 at 13:32

""A mid-winter severe cold snap may not injure plants unless it is immediately followed by unseasonably mild conditions.""

I agree it's a strange statement and doesn't make sense to me. Perhaps he meant, "A mid-winter severe cold snap may not injure plants unless it is immediately preceded by unseasonably mild conditions."


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RE: dry pesticide rates for hand held sprayers

Thanks for the thoughts gents. Guess we might get some first hand instruction this Winter around the country on the effects of yo-yo temps. at least. I'll just leave the trees alone and stop chomping at the bit to prune when we get temps. back up in the 60s for a day to be safe and sure.

Last Sunday at 2:30 p.m. it was sunny, and 61 degrees. At 5:30 we got a hard 15 minute snow storm and the temp. plunged to 35. By midnight the temp fell to 11 deg.. Whacko, to be sure!!!


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