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Sweetcrisp blueberry finally producing

Posted by bamboo_rabbit 9A Inverness FL (My Page) on
Mon, Mar 10, 14 at 18:46

When I bought the first set of Sweetcrisps I had done my homework and knew they were not the most productive of bushes but once you eat that first one you no longer care. Have 50 or so Sweetcrisp bushes and the oldest are 4 years old now so 3rd bearing season and finally I can say they are producing a decent amount of berries. Not nearly as many as Emerald but they never will. Pardon the less than perfect cell phone pic.

 photo 20140310_181754_zpsb40c303e.jpg

This post was edited by bamboo_rabbit on Mon, Mar 10, 14 at 19:58


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Sweetcrisp blueberry finally producing

Can you say a bit more about the taste? Are they really that much out of the ordinary?

I have three small bushes and need some more motivation to keep them around since they are taking a long time to get going.

Scott


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RE: Sweetcrisp blueberry finally producing

Scott,

It isn't just the taste that makes them so great it is the texture. On other blueberries when they turn blue they are not yet ripe, they have to hang a few days before the flavor and sweetness really develop. With sweetcrisp the day it turns blue and even has some purple at the bottom it is wonderful. Left to hang a few days it is stellar. Two years ago when I was up at Just fruits and exotics buying some grape vines I was talking blueberries with the owner who is also a BB nut. She asked if I had tried sweetcrisp yet and I replied I had and had (at the time) 25 bushes. She was telling me in her opinion they were not just a bit better than all other BB cultivars but a degree of magnitude better.....can't argue with that.

It is sad that most people will never taste them. The one major flaw they have is the tendency to just produce a medium amount of flower buds.....that will limit them and because the commercial folks drive the market sweetcrisp will never be widely distributed.

I assume the ones you bought were TC plants? Hope they turn out to be the real deal. So many people on the board got conned buying fake sweetcrisps. Luckily it is one of the few BB that are easy to tell what it is.


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RE: Sweetcrisp blueberry finally producing

  • Posted by fruitnut z7b-8a,4500ft SW TX (My Page) on
    Tue, Mar 11, 14 at 9:47

Scott you probably already know my answer to your question. Sweetcrisp fruit is very much out of the ordinary. No one would have selected such a lousy plant if not for the fruit. That makes it my kind of fruit and I think yours as well, something you'll not find in any store.

Are you not expecting a little fruit this year? Feed it some 21-0-0. Get some growth on it and it will fruit. Mine usually bloom more than I expect based on what buds I can see. Maybe you'll at least get a taste this year.

This post was edited by fruitnut on Tue, Mar 11, 14 at 9:50


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RE: Sweetcrisp blueberry finally producing

Thanks, sounds like three very strong endorsements there!

Most of the plants I have are from Horner Farms. They came bare root and didn't grow at all the first year and just started getting going their 2nd year. I'll give them a bigger dose of fertilizer this year. I don't think there are any flowers this year but hopefully next.

Scott


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RE: Sweetcrisp blueberry finally producing

Scott,

Bareroot should not be an issue at all. I prefer the bareroot plants as they firm up in the soil much better/quicker and take off faster. The potted plants especially if the roots have started to circle stay tippy for so long and I think that sets them back some. If the PH and fertilizer is right sweetcrisp is one of the faster growers....a bit lanky for my likening but fast.


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RE: Sweetcrisp blueberry finally producing

I have several rabbiteye blueberries and one unknown southern highbush. Rabbiteyes do fine but the southern highbush blooms too early and late frost usually gets it.

How early does sweetcrisp bloom in relation to most rabbiteye varieties?


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RE: Sweetcrisp blueberry finally producing

I bought one Sweetcrisp but all this talk makes me want more! Yeah I know what Scott is saying though. I got a bare root, and it's not that it is bare root, it's in bad shape, so i expect it to do nothing this year, it's a Southmoon though. I have yet to recieve the Sweetcrisp, which is good with 10 inches of snow coming tonight! Also got in a Legacy and it's tough looking and strong, it even had flower buds on it. I cut them all off.
I just may have to order another sweetcrisp! Sounds like you can't have too many...


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RE: Sweetcrisp blueberry finally producing

  • Posted by fruitnut z7b-8a,4500ft SW TX (My Page) on
    Tue, Mar 11, 14 at 17:02

If pH is right and enough water and nitrogen any blueberry plant will grow like a weed. It doesn't matter how rough or small when purchased provided they have good roots. At least that's my experience. Any that didn't grow rapidly were my error. And that's without any fungi, micronutrients, or whatever else.

In pots the first year is critical. After they get established they are bullet proof by comparison.

Sweetcrisp fruit is in a league of it's own. I was just reading about some other new blueberry and it like many was described as fully crisp. I'm thinking well how many times have I read that. And has this guy eaten Sweetcrisp?


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RE: Sweetcrisp blueberry finally producing

Scott,
If your plant didn't take off, you may need
To give it some encouragement! Have you tried
putting some vinegar in your water to bring your soil ph down?
Look back at Fruitnuts post on adding ammonium
sulfate to water. He gets tremendous growth from
doing that! You can use about a teaspoonful of
21-0-0 to a gallon of water during the growing season. Do
you have them in the ground or pots? What is your soil
Medium if in pots?


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RE: Sweetcrisp blueberry finally producing

"If pH is right and enough water and nitrogen any blueberry plant will grow like a weed. It doesn't matter how rough or small when purchased provided they have good roots"

Exactly my concern the roots, I would say it lost 80%, ripped right off of it. I'm not sure it will even survive, if it does nothing I'll be extremely happy As nothing means it didn't die. I'm hoping the extra stuff will help in recovery. Although I'm not optimistic.

As far as growth the most impressive plants I have seen are Blueboy's. His organic approach is impressive, and all the extra stuff is in the organic fertilizer, fungi, bacteria, micronutrients and sulfur, his 3 year old plants look 6 years old.
I'm converted! I actually will do the same thing with different products, but once I'm out, I'm buying the products he is using.

I see Just Fruits is out of Sweetcrisp, but I emailed them anyway , and they emailed back that they may have a cancelation, so I may just get a 2nd Sweetcrisp, a big one too! Might as well before we can't get them! Not like more vendors are offering them.

This is my 3rd year growing blueberries, and I'm finding it pretty easy, As you say as long as you have conditions right, it's easy.

This post was edited by Drew51 on Wed, Mar 12, 14 at 1:56


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RE: Sweetcrisp blueberry finally producing

My plants had a bad leaf spot when I got them, they were barely staying alive the first year. That may have been a bigger problem than the bare-root. I will check the pH this spring to make sure its good; it was good after I made the bed but I haven't checked it since. They will also get an extra large dose of fertilizer this spring.

Scott


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RE: Sweetcrisp blueberry finally producing

Scott,

An extra large dose is a very bad idea especially if the plants are ailing. What you need is light fertilizer doses often, weekly. I understand the plants may not have much by way of roots but consider this........Millers in Gainesville takes a 6" stem cutting and turns that in to a 2 foot tall plant in less than a year. How? They give them the right conditions and feed them with every watering.


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RE: Sweetcrisp blueberry finally producing

BR, I only have slow release organic fertilizer, should have made that clear. Its difficult to over fertilize with slow release 5-5-5.

Scott


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RE: Sweetcrisp blueberry finally producing

Scott,

Got it. While I realize ammonium sulfate is not organic why not use some to get the plants off and running? I guarantee you the plants were getting it before you received them....Once they are growing well then switch to the organic program if that is what you desire.


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RE: Sweetcrisp blueberry finally producing

  • Posted by fruitnut z7b-8a,4500ft SW TX (My Page) on
    Wed, Mar 12, 14 at 10:22

The gardenweb appears to delete old posts after 1-2 yrs. So my original post on Sweetcrisp and rapid blueberry growth appears to be toast.

I bought my first Sweetcrisp and several other varieties in April 2010. They looked like this. I started out at 21-0-0 rate shown but think I upped it to 1 tablespoon per 2.5 gal once a week. Water as needed with rainwater in between.

2010 blueberries photo 047.jpg

Exactly one year later and still in 3 gallon pots Sweetcrisp looked like this and I was hooked on the fruit. Squares on cardboard are one foot.

2011 Sweetcrisp photo 017.jpg

For comparison some other varieties at one year showing much more fruit on several.

2011 Emerald photo 008.jpg

2011 Farthing photo 007.jpg


2011 Scintilla photo 005.jpg

This post was edited by fruitnut on Wed, Mar 12, 14 at 11:00


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RE: Sweetcrisp blueberry finally producing

Here's blueboy1977 photos of his plants, again these are not my photos, but nice to have all these photos together

Young sweetcrisp
 photo null_zpsbe061af3.jpg

3 year old Sweetcrisp
 photo null_zps6ce04161.jpg


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RE: Sweetcrisp blueberry finally producing

  • Posted by fruitnut z7b-8a,4500ft SW TX (My Page) on
    Wed, Mar 12, 14 at 11:25

Blueboy has done a great job pruning his Sweetcrisp. It's a challenge with this variety but it does grow like a weed. The hard part is getting it to look as blocky as his. It wants to grow tall and spindly like mine, 4ft tall at one yr.


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RE: Sweetcrisp blueberry finally producing

Fruitnut, they still look good, and producing a lot! It would be cool to know how the breeder developed this one, the exact lineage. I have read about tomato breeders, and raspberry breeders, the process is extremely different, and would be curious about the steps needed to propagate. And curious as the the exact plants used etc. probably in the patent. The Niwot raspberry was an F3 seedling. Interesting, and it took 15 years. The breeder is still working on others. Even asked for help, cool guy.


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RE: Sweetcrisp blueberry finally producing

Drew,

That is easy. Sweetcrisp is a cross between Southern Belle and FL95-3 which is an unpatented variety. The seed was planted and it first fruited along with all of it's fellow seedling in 1996 and was the only plant out of that seed run to be kept and further propagated. Dr. Lyrene is the inventor and is responsible for almost all of our favorite SHB BB.

I agree Blueboy does an awesome job pruning, I just don't have the time for that much close detail. My plants are spaced tighter though so I can't let mine get that wide anyway. You almost have to be draconian with sweetcrisp to keep it compact.

Steve did beat me though, my first set of 25 sweetcrisp would have been planted October of 2010. It took me a solid 4 months of searching to find them though when I did it ended up being just 6 miles from my house lol.....go figure. They were bare root. The second set of 50 (25 were mine) came from True Blue and were potted. Planted those 2 years? later.

This post was edited by bamboo_rabbit on Wed, Mar 12, 14 at 13:08


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RE: Sweetcrisp blueberry finally producing

Thanks for the info, although the patent is quite different from what you say..


`Bluecrisp` originated as a seedling in the University of Florida blueberry breeding program in Gainesville, Fla. `Bluecrisp` and both its pollen and its seed parent are mainly Vaccinium corymbosum L., but `Bluecrisp` and both of its parents have some genes from Vaccinium darrowi Camp. The cross from which the original plant was grown was made in a greenhouse in Gainesville in March 1980. Because the seeds from a large number of crosses were bulked before planting, the exact seed and pollen parents that gave rise to `Bluecrisp` are not known


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RE: Sweetcrisp blueberry finally producing

  • Posted by fruitnut z7b-8a,4500ft SW TX (My Page) on
    Wed, Mar 12, 14 at 13:22

The Farthing yielded 4 lbs at one yr. Sweetcrisp 1.5 lbs. Emerald and Jewel were only slightly better than Sweetcrisp. The later two probably yield twice Sweetcrisp after a couple years. But they really need part of the fruit pruned off.

Bamboo:

How would you rate yield of Sweetcrisp compared to others? Can you give anyone some guidance? Will it be more than half the top yielders if the top yielders are pruned for decent quaility fruit?


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RE: Sweetcrisp blueberry finally producing

Drew......

That is Bluecrisp, Sweetcrisp is an entirely different plant. I got my information straight from Dr. Lyrene himself so I'm pretty sure it is accurate as he is the inventor.


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RE: Sweetcrisp blueberry finally producing

Steve,

I can give you my opinion on percentages but not exacts as I don't weigh the berries from individual bushes.

I can tell you that I was no where even in the same ballpark as 1.5 pounds from a 1 year old.....at two years they did not produce close to that. Last year they would have done better but I had a irrigation failure and some berries were lost due to a freeze.

Comparing say a 2 year old Emerald to a 2 year old sweetcrisp...the Emerald would produce 10X what Sweetcrisp did so on that we are at odds. Far as Jewel yep I agree with you as they are slow to get in the production groove and I would say they are equal to sweetcrisp in the early years.

If you would have asked me last year or the year before I would have said a mature sweetcrisp might give 1/3 as much as most others. This year though my oldest bushes are loaded and I would say it is probably 3/4 as much as other average varieties (varieties like Emerald and Jewel excluded) their age and I am thrilled by that.

Speaking of Farthing.....I was at my commercial BB friends house last Tuesday and he will be picking in another 2 weeks......way ahead of me but they dormex. His farthing's looked awesome.....just loaded and such nice dark green leaves. It is a variety I don't have but should have got. I have room for 32 more bushes then I am DONE......and all of those will be Ravens.


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RE: Sweetcrisp blueberry finally producing

"Drew......
That is Bluecrisp
"

Oops! Never mind!!


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RE: Sweetcrisp blueberry finally producing

"How early does sweetcrisp bloom in relation to most rabbiteye varieties?"

I'm near Charlotte, c5tiger, and the Sweetcrisp that I bought last spring is pretty much in sync with my assortment of rabbiteyes (all of which are extending flowers) -- some are slightly ahead, some are slightly behind, but there's not a big difference. In comparison to my other southern highbush plants, it's behind O'Neal (which is opening a few flowers), at about the same stage as Scintilla (also new last year), and slightly ahead of South Moon. That being said, all the bushes that I mentioned are potted and overwintered under a frost blanket, and I suspect that those factors do have an influence on bloom time. My neighbor's in ground rabbiteyes are a week or two behind mine.


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RE: Sweetcrisp blueberry finally producing

Very nice Bam, your several weeks ahead of me. I've still got unopened flowers on Sweetcrisp. About half the fruit has set, other half still opening or with flowers falling. Like yours my Sweetcrisp on going in there 3rd season with me and have a healthy fruit set. I actually thinned buds for the first time this year but don't know how if it was really needed or not. I was worried more about fruit weight when ripe breaking branches because of how thin the branches are. Even so, both my 4 year olds look awesome this year! I recently up potted them to 30 gallon pots so they will be in full production next year. I've got two more young 2 year olds coming on strong as well. The only variety that's on your schedule is Springhigh. It's the only one I have right now with no flowers.

As far as Rabbiteye bloom over lapping SHB I think it depends on how far north you are. In my area the only SHB that over lapped bloom with Rabbiteye was Sunshine Blue and it wasn't that much of an over lap either. Up north they will both stay dormant until warm temps arrive and by then both have met chill requirements. Not so in the South.


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RE: Sweetcrisp blueberry finally producing

Fruitnut wrote:
The gardenweb appears to delete old posts after 1-2 yrs. So my original post on Sweetcrisp and rapid blueberry growth appears to be toast.

Is THIS (One and 7 yr blueberry growth with pictures) the post/thread you were looking for?


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RE: Sweetcrisp blueberry finally producing

  • Posted by fruitnut z7b-8a,4500ft SW TX (My Page) on
    Thu, Mar 13, 14 at 13:49

That's one I was thinking about before I tasted Sweetcrisp fruit. Thanks for finding it.


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RE: Sweetcrisp blueberry finally producing

Fruitnut, that was the post that started it for me. Seems like just yesterday! I was floored when I saw your pics and never looked back. Thanks again for that kick in the butt!!!!


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RE: Sweetcrisp blueberry finally producing

Wanted to share a pic of one of my Sweetcrisp.
I planted this as a liner last July and believe
me it was the smallest liner out of the group
that I received. Planted it 8 months ago in
A five gallon bucket. Used Osmocote sparingly
and supplemented with ammonium sulfate in
water a couple of times last summer also added
some ferrous sulfate to water a few times. Used
vinegar in my water also to bring Ph down.


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RE: Sweetcrisp blueberry finally producing

It looks good! Don't use anymore Osmocote, it has nitrates, which can harm blueberries. If you want a slow release try organics like Holly-Tone, or cottonseed meal. MicroLife Azalea is awesome if you can find it.


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RE: Sweetcrisp blueberry finally producing

Looks great Chad


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RE: Sweetcrisp blueberry finally producing

"Don't use anymore Osmocote, it has nitrates, which can harm blueberries."

It's true that blueberries use ammoniacal nitrogen more efficiently, but nitrate nitrogen, when used in moderation, can be perfectly safe for blueberries. Osmocote offers a blend of the two that's weighted toward ammoniacal nitrogen and should be perfectly safe for blueberries.


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RE: Sweetcrisp blueberry finally producing

Your opinion and many Universities disagree with you. I just want to make that clear, that many experts do not think it is safe. The user can decide for himself or do his own research. Multiple references to why are out there.
Dave Wilson Nurseries say it can kill your plants
U of Conn Extension
soiltest.uconn.edu/factsheets/FertPracBlueberry.pdf

From Cornell:
'Blueberries also have the unique ability to directly absorb the ammonium ion. Most plants absorb nitrate, which is then converted to ammonium by nitrate reductase, before incorporation into proteins. However, nitrate fertilizers can be detrimental to the blueberry.
http://www.fruit.cornell.edu/berry/production/blueberryproduction.htm

All that being said, I don't think it will kill the plant. I think
it may not be the best choice. I myself prefer not to use anything that could possibly hurt my plants.
Everybody can make their own minds up. I know many disagree that it is unsafe too. Obviuosly you are one that feels it helps your blueberry plants.

This post was edited by Drew51 on Fri, Mar 14, 14 at 10:08


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RE: Sweetcrisp blueberry finally producing

My opinion is based on personal experience using Osmocote on blueberries, extensive reading here in the Gardenweb forum where other growers (some on a large scale) have reported good results with fertilizers that contain nitrates, as well as university recommendations for the use of ammonium nitrate (in light doses, of course) in low pH soils where acid-forming fertilizers like ammonium sulfate might lower the pH too far. Please understand that I'm not saying that nitrates are the best choice for blueberries -- they're not. I'm merely saying that nitrates aren't by their very nature toxic to blueberries, and that fertilizers that derive a modest portion of their nitrogen from nitrates (like Osmocote) should be perfectly safe.


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RE: Sweetcrisp blueberry finally producing

I prefer to follow the advice of Dave Wilson Nurseies. To each his own.

From DWN:
Check carefully when selecting fertilizers: the nitrogen must not be from nitrate, which can be deadly to blueberries (don't find out the hard way!).


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RE: Sweetcrisp blueberry finally producing

  • Posted by mrclint z10SoCal Valley (My Page) on
    Fri, Mar 14, 14 at 10:56

I think shazaam's point is that a lot of this "information" simply gets parroted every where. There is value in people using different methods and products, and it's good to know what works in the real world and what doesn't.


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RE: Sweetcrisp blueberry finally producing

Spectrum Analytic has the most robust information on BB fertilization I have yet run across on the web. Per Spectrum:
"Blueberries, and their relatives’ cranberries, lingonberries, and bilberries have somewhat unique N requirements. They are not able to use nitrate forms of N (NO3-N) effectively. These plants have evolved in soil conditions that do not naturally contain a significant amount of NO3-N and they depend more on ammonium-N (NH4-N). Blueberries take up both forms of N, but they have limited nitrate reductase activity. Nitrate reductase is an enzyme that is needed to convert nitrate to amino acids and proteins. The limited nitrate reductase system in blueberries means that they cannot efficiently utilize nitrate forms of N. Some reports also state that excessive nitrate fertilization can lead to leaf burn."

Note: It is pointed out that soils in which bb's naturally grow are low in nitrates, not absent of any nitrates.

This seems to be a case of the warnings to not use nitrate as the primary source of nitrogen being translated and passed along as "never use any nitrates". Scientific and anecdotal information does not support the assertion that nitrates cannot be present. Just that it cannot be the primary (or a significant) source of nitrogen.


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RE: Sweetcrisp blueberry finally producing

If you look into Osmocote, if temps go over 80 degrees it releases a lot faster. 6 month fertilizer is exhausted in 3 months. Dynamite slow release is a much better product. Same thing happens with it, but it will last 4.5 months (9 month release fertilizer). But this could cause a huge release of nitrates.
Blueberry plants have limited nitrate reductase
activities, meaning the assimilation of nitrate in blueberry
plants could be limited. Luckily Osmocote has a small percentage of nitrates, so I guess no danger, but it's like eating puffer fish, eat enough and it will kill you.
I myself do hold anecdotal evidence in high regard. You have no way of knowing what damage you did by using this product, all you can tell me is the plant survived, and grew somewhat, how much more or less is not quantified in any way, so it's not good info.
I guess being trained in the laboratory sciences, I prefer to go by the scientific studies, which do show lack of performance in blueberries when nitrates are used.


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RE: Sweetcrisp blueberry finally producing

  • Posted by mayadawg zone 9 san francisco (My Page) on
    Mon, Apr 14, 14 at 18:41

I've got 6 sweetcrisp and used fruitnuts feeding regimine the first year. The turned out great. I want more but they are difficult to get here in california unless you are willing to pay 40$ a plant. So I'm going to root some of my cuttings this year after harvest .... Another note they grow great in San Francisco


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RE: Sweetcrisp blueberry finally producing

I purchased a couple of "sweetcrisp" blueberry plants last year from an online vendor called "BerriesPlus" which is also known as w3Plants / Botanical Growers Network. Does any know if they were selling "actual" sweetcrisps or did I probably get another variety? I received the plants in 14" cones and planted them in 10 gallon pots. Both started off slow but grew quickly with some help from Holly-tone.


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RE: Sweetcrisp blueberry finally producing

I got one Sweetcrisp from Botanical Growers. I think it is true according to the descriptions/discussions on this forum. New shoot tip droops in the summer sun. And the berry has almost no Calyx.

I had a few yesterday. They are crunchier than Emerald. Not really crisp, more meaty like. I am getting another one from Florida Hill Nursery. Hope at least one of the two is true.


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RE: Sweetcrisp blueberry finally producing

Mayadawg, Sweetcrisp is a patent protected variety so any form of propigation is illegal. If you do it, dont announce it!


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RE: Sweetcrisp blueberry finally producing

As BB said they are patented...illegal propagation is why the new upcoming varieties won't be available to most of us home growers.


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RE: Sweetcrisp blueberry finally producing

I don't mind paying a fair price for a patented plant, and most places sell for decent prices except for blueberries, at least some types. If they keep charging those outrageous prices, I will not be buying more.


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RE: Sweetcrisp blueberry finally producing

  • Posted by mayadawg zone 9 san francisco (My Page) on
    Tue, Apr 15, 14 at 3:44

Ok I thought it was illegal for resale...


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RE: Sweetcrisp blueberry finally producing

Maybe I'll grow some hybrids from seed. now that is legal!
And may result is something really good! A Liberty-Sweetcrisp hybrid, more adapted back to northern zones., prolific producer, and ornamental to boot.


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RE: Sweetcrisp blueberry finally producing

  • Posted by mayadawg zone 9 san francisco (My Page) on
    Tue, Apr 15, 14 at 5:52

Don't ask how i got them to California now that was illegal lol had to ship to ups store in Reno and smuggle them across the border...


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RE: Sweetcrisp blueberry finally producing

  • Posted by mayadawg zone 9 san francisco (My Page) on
    Tue, Apr 15, 14 at 5:57

Has anyone been growing a Spartan curious on how they compare?


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RE: Sweetcrisp blueberry finally producing

Since Spartan is a northern, it probably would not do well at your location, it would great at mine. One I'm interested in too, but no more room.


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RE: Sweetcrisp blueberry finally producing

I do agree with you that the markup is a bit nuts.....The commercial guys can buy these 2 foot tall bareroot Sweetcrisp plants for $2 or less. I can buy them for $5 in lots of 100. I'm all for profit but turning around in CA and selling them for $40? or even $20? A bit much.


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RE: Sweetcrisp blueberry finally producing

Bamboo-rabbit
Did you notice what insects pollinated your sweetcrisp.
I had very good bloom and bees found the plant but seemed frustrated at their inability to get their short proboscis into the flowers.
No bumblebees here.


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RE: Sweetcrisp blueberry finally producing

Greendumb,

For the first year ever honeybees worked my BB's, they had always ignored them but maybe a new hive moved in or I now have enough BB to make it worthwhile? Not sure.

95% of the pollination of my BB comes from the southern blueberry bee, It looks like a very small bumble bee with a white dot on it's face. Very docile, you can actually pet them when they are feeding. They collect both nectar and pollen. There are also some type of shiny green fly that works them. Another that is here in large numbers but I don't know how good they pollinate is the skipper butterfly. I also have some sort of small hornet or wasp and they chew a hole in the flower at the base and use that. There are also some large carpenter bee type bumble bees.


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RE: Sweetcrisp blueberry finally producing

  • Posted by mayadawg zone 9 san francisco (My Page) on
    Tue, Apr 15, 14 at 14:38

Bamboo Look at what this guy sells them for you can grow some out and put them online..

Here is a link that might be useful: 2 or 3 yr old sweetcrisp for sale


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RE: Sweetcrisp blueberry finally producing

Geez........ I really am surprised nobody does that.


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RE: Sweetcrisp blueberry finally producing

Some guy? That's a huge nursery with hundreds and hundreds of plants for sale.


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