Return to the Fruit & Orchards Forum | Post a Follow-Up

 o
Quince Habit

Posted by geoffs_ri 6 (My Page) on
Thu, May 3, 12 at 9:45

Hi...I hope that this is the right forum for this question. I usually post in figs, but I have a question about a quince tree that I hope can be answered here. I would like to either train a quince shrub into a tree or move the shrub to a better location.

I'm asking this after reading an article in today's NY Times on quince trees and fruits.

Here's the details...

I was given a quince bush about 10 years ago...it was growing poorly in a shady spot, so I was given the opportunity to dig it up and replant it at my house in a near-full sun location.

I don't know the variety...if it's meant to be a bush habit or a tree habit, dwarf, etc.

I did not think far ahead into the future and sited it poorly. It's kinda jammed in between some evergreen shrubs in the front corner of my house, southeast. Like I said, near-full sun. It has grown shrubby and has invaded into the evergreens behind it. I trim the thorny branches that stick out into my path.

I'm wondering if I can severely cut it back to a main stem and train it up to low tree. I'm happy to clear out the low growing evergreens behind it. If not, I'd like some direction (web site instructions) on how and when to move it.

Thanks,
Geoff in RI


Follow-Up Postings:

 o
RE: Quince Habit

What species of quince - there are several?

Since you say "bush" I am going to assume you mean flowering quince, Chaenomeles. Yes, I am sure you could select one vigorous stalk and train it into a low standard -- you can do this with most shrubs.

The only downside I see to that is you will be fighting a LOT of suckers from the roots all of the time, since nature wanted it to be a multi-stemmed shrub. One way I have dealt with that situation in the past is to put some VERY heavy, dense material on the ground around the trunk of the selected stem, kept an inch or two back from the trunk, and then thick organic mulch over the top -- this seems to stop the majority of the suckers from growing, and you can hand-trim the few that come up around the trunk. A couple of layers of old carpet (that is what I have used), some black rubber/vinyl pond liner with small holes punched in it for drainage, a couple of thicknesses of 6 mil black poly, or possibly one of those recycled-tire "tree rings" should work.

Good luck, sounds do-able to me.


 o
RE: Quince Habit

The flowering quince you have is intended to be used as a flowering shrub. Training it to a standard would be a novelty but would greatly reduce the bloom. It might make a fruit now and then. If fruit is you goal, better to get a semi-dwarf fruiting quince tree. The trees do not have red blooms, though.

For you current plant, you could prune it now just to keep it in check but it might be better to wait until fall to move it and then hard prune it. You will lose quite a few roots in the process, that is why it should not be moved during the active growing season.


 o
RE: Quince Habit

Dennin and Larry, thanks for your thoughtful replies. I realize now that I have a flowering quince, which is considered a different species altogether (according to Wikipedia). Mine flowers white. I do get some fragrant fruit, but they are on the smaller side and hard to process. I will consider getting a fruit since tree.


 o
THANKS fot Quince Habit Thoughts

Dennin and Larry, thanks for your thoughtful replies. I realize now that I have a flowering quince, which is considered a different species altogether (according to Wikipedia). Mine flowers white. I do get some fragrant fruit, but they are on the smaller side and hard to process. I will consider getting a fruit since tree.


 o
RE: Quince Habit

if you going to get a quince tree, don't buy from that Ty Ty Nursery. I think its probably the worst reviewed nursery in the US lol. Just google them and you'll see the negative reviews (or members can let you know here). I got a few of mine this year from One Green World and RainTree they mentioned. Good bareroot trees.

PS I saw the korean market had some quince fruit for sale in my area this week. Seems like everything like pomegranates etc that come out at weird times of the season are grown in Chili. I'll have to check the label where they from this week.


 o
RE: Quince Habit

Stay away from TyTy for anything, other than bemusement at their bizarre photoshopped photos.

Three main genera of plants fall into the 'quince' moniker.
Cydonia oblonga - the small tree species commonly accepted in Europe as the true quince - a number of different selections, made for fruit size/quality - Smyrna, Pineapple, Orange, Aromatnaya, etc.
Chaenomeles spp. - the 'flowering quince' - some of which may fruit heavily. I grew up eating those hard green/yellow incredibly sour things from a particularly productive strain my grandmother grew. Flower color can vary from white to red to orange/peach.
Pseudocydonia chinensis - the 'Chinese quince' - produces a large firm sour fruit - and is a nice ornamental as well, with spring bloom, great fall color display, and interesting exfoliating bark, resembling some of the crape myrtles.
Chaenomeles and Pseudocydonia fruits can be substituted for the fruits of Cydonia in recipes for quince marmalade, etc.


 o
RE: Quince Habit

Fruiting quince trees have mostly white flowers with a hint of pink, not much different from your present shrub.


 o Post a Follow-Up

Please Note: Only registered members are able to post messages to this forum.

    If you are a member, please log in.

    If you aren't yet a member, join now!


Return to the Fruit & Orchards Forum

Information about Posting

  • You must be logged in to post a message. Once you are logged in, a posting window will appear at the bottom of the messages. If you are not a member, please register for an account.
  • Please review our Rules of Play before posting.
  • Posting is a two-step process. Once you have composed your message, you will be taken to the preview page. You will then have a chance to review your post, make changes and upload photos.
  • After posting your message, you may need to refresh the forum page in order to see it.
  • Before posting copyrighted material, please read about Copyright and Fair Use.
  • We have a strict no-advertising policy!
  • If you would like to practice posting or uploading photos, please visit our Test forum.
  • If you need assistance, please Contact Us and we will be happy to help.


Learn more about in-text links on this page here