Return to the Fruit & Orchards Forum | Post a Follow-Up

 o
ammonium sulfate

Posted by bullet08 7 (My Page) on
Fri, May 2, 14 at 19:14

my blueberries are growing well. i'm not sure if the leaves need to be little greener or not, but it's not dark green. so been thinking about fertilizer.

i have read ammonium sulfate is he best fertilizer, something like 21-0-0. potash is not good for bb.

but i'm not finding ammounium sulfate anywhere around here. i called all the "feed" store and found one what had it, but it's not 21-0-0. they are all like 31-10-10 or 29-8-8 or something.

i would like to use 21-0-0 since that is what semes to work, but since i can't find it, would 31-10-10 or 29-8-8 work? both MG and other brands have acid loving plant fertilizer. will they do the job? will the potash in them cause any problem?


Follow-Up Postings:

 o
RE: ammonium sulfate

home depot sells it in the lawn care section...


 o
RE: ammonium sulfate

  • Posted by mrclint z10SoCal Valley (My Page) on
    Fri, May 2, 14 at 20:53

The best fertilizer is the one that you apply correctly, and as needed, which works best for your locale and your application.

Lots of folks use ammonium sulfate here, but I don't. I've used it on plants in the past and never will again. I found that pest and disease pressure increased with the application of high N and plant vigor dropped off if I didn't give them their "dose/fix" of high N. Ammonium sulfate does nothing good for living soils. N is like crack to plants, and I'd just as soon shoot for slow, strong and steady growth over rapid greening. Better to feed the soil that feeds the plants in most cases (container growing is slightly different). I like and am happier with organic formulations, or those that are lower in N with other elements that plants need as well.


 o
RE: ammonium sulfate

I love organic spin, what a bunch of,,,, well you know.
Amazon carries it too.


 o
RE: ammonium sulfate

Sold all day long on ebay............where I got mine.


 o
RE: ammonium sulfate

Home Depot, sprinkle some around the base of the plant and water it in. Make sure what you buy is ammonium sulf. The amount used goes up as the plant gets older. I have used it for years and have never experienced any disease problems that I know of. I do, however see a drop in ph over time so test your soil ph at least on e a year and go from there.

RM


 o
RE: ammonium sulfate

>> I love organic spin, what a bunch of,,,, well you know.

Was that really necessary?


 o
RE: ammonium sulfate

  • Posted by mrclint z10SoCal Valley (My Page) on
    Sat, May 3, 14 at 16:27

Drew51 & cold_weather_is_evil (outstanding username, by the way), no offense taken. I assumed that the original poster made the incorrect assumption that high N fertilizer (ammonium sulfate) containing little else is the consensus choice of everyone on this forum, It isn't my choice through experience and reason. Alternatives such as organic principles, are expected to cause a certain amount of shock and awe to folks unfamiliar/not receptive to said principles. :)


 o
RE: ammonium sulfate

mrclint,
I assume the poster wants to use it because it is the most potent acidifying fertilizer apart from elemental sulfur. Among organic amendments, the best acidifiers are again high-N ones, such as soybean meal, alfalfa meal and blood meal.


 o
RE: ammonium sulfate

  • Posted by mrclint z10SoCal Valley (My Page) on
    Sat, May 3, 14 at 17:00

Slimy_Okra, we agree that there are other formulations. Most fertilizers containing meals have added elements to help build soil and/or provide other nutrients. These meal formulations don't approach the 21-0-0 AS formulation. Cottonseed meal runs about 6-2-2 (your mileage may vary),


 o
RE: ammonium sulfate

i'm not looking for organic solutions. looking for something quicker. i grow everything in containers, and organic fertilizer didn't provide results i was looking for in other trees/plants.


 o
RE: ammonium sulfate

Well I like to stay organic too, but I hate the word organic, I find it silly. As most chemical pesticides are no doubt organic in nature. The real meaning of the word as in organic chemistry. Sorry I was trained as a scientist. And nitrogen is nitrogen is nitrogen, source doesn't matter, the plant does not care. Organic fertilizers break down into soluble fertilizer, but starting with soluble is somehow bad? I find that hilarious. Of course you want to supply the other stuff. My blueberries are fertilized with an organic fertilizer, acidic. Green Sand, Azomite, and rock phosphate are in my soil mix. I sometimes spray with molasses, Epson salts, kelp, and hydrogen peroxide. Then once a month I hit them with AS, results are spectacular.


 o
RE: ammonium sulfate

  • Posted by mrclint z10SoCal Valley (My Page) on
    Sat, May 3, 14 at 22:31

I don't find organic silly at all since I eat and offer what I grow to my family and friends. If I can't do better than what's offered at the market conventionally, why bother at all? What have I accomplished as a gardener?

The original poster wants something that is "quicker" than organic, they believe that ammonium sulfate will get them there faster, so they should get some ammonium sulfate and report back their velocity.


 o
RE: ammonium sulfate

already tried organic on fig trees. for my container culture result is dismal compare to simple osmocote and MG fertilizers. there were no added benefit either. plants didn't look any healthier, or grow better.

the organic fertilizer was tested on both older and newly rooted cuttings. so... why waste time other than the feel good factor? i feel much better when my trees and plants response to what i do for them. i'm sure organic works for others, but i haven't seen any improvement over what i haved used previously for 4 yrs.

from what I understand, bb needs even less. they are in peat moss heavy soil. i have very soft water here. they are growing well and putting on the leaves, but the leaves are not very dark green.

after reading further, i think MG acid loving plant fertilizer will work until i can find the "crack" for my plants.


 o
RE: ammonium sulfate

  • Posted by mrclint z10SoCal Valley (My Page) on
    Sun, May 4, 14 at 10:17

bullet08, got it. I went the other way, started out with MG liquid for acid loving plants and went with an organic blend and I'm happier now.


 o
RE: ammonium sulfate

unfortunately, the conversation has become a bit defensive and salty. I actually understand (to a point) the concept of "organic"...but I am not overly concerned with it. For an above post that asks "why bother"....the reasons many of us grow our own fruits and veges is because of the following reasons: freshest of food to eat, satisfaction of working and nurturing something...and seeing it come to "fruition" (haha), being able to share with others, and allowing our food to be harvested ripe (unlike much of commercial production). PS I have done a poor job growing my blueberry plants. I consider myself a very good gardener in general (expert in some areas)...but I obviously need to get better with my blueberries. Happy growing....


 o
RE: ammonium sulfate

If you can get your hands on diammonium phosphate (18-46-0), dissolve it in water, then add approximately double the weight of epsom salt and mix it well, magnesium phosphate will precipitate out of the solution. Let it settle and decant the dissolved ammonium sulfate into a separate container.


 o Post a Follow-Up

Please Note: Only registered members are able to post messages to this forum.

    If you are a member, please log in.

    If you aren't yet a member, join now!


Return to the Fruit & Orchards Forum

Information about Posting

  • You must be logged in to post a message. Once you are logged in, a posting window will appear at the bottom of the messages. If you are not a member, please register for an account.
  • Posting is a two-step process. Once you have composed your message, you will be taken to the preview page. You will then have a chance to review your post, make changes and upload photos.
  • After posting your message, you may need to refresh the forum page in order to see it.
  • Before posting copyrighted material, please read about Copyright and Fair Use.
  • We have a strict no-advertising policy!
  • If you would like to practice posting or uploading photos, please visit our Test forum.
  • If you need assistance, please Contact Us and we will be happy to help.


Learn more about in-text links on this page here