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Persimmon and pawpaw faliure

Posted by milehighgirl CO USDA 5B/Sunset 2B (My Page) on
Mon, Jul 8, 13 at 0:16

I received an NC-10 from England last fall and it was not quite fully dormant but I planted it. It did not make it through the winter. This spring when I realized I had lost it he sent me a Yates. This one has not done anything either. I am so disappointed.

Also my remaining pawpaw that is 5 years old was planted outside for the first time last winter and it did not survive either.

I just got back from a road trip to Florida and I am still a little stunned by the vast difference in climates. Driving I-75 through Georgia, Tennessee, and Kentucky was a real eye-opener for me. I have never seen such forests. This has made me reconsider how I am growing (or trying to grow) my persimmons and pawpaws. I believe that the drastic weather changes and dry climate are hampering my abilities to succeed.

I had looked at the success that Tony in Omaha is having and felt I should be able to grow similar trees, but in truth the climate there is much more conducive to growing trees that need more humidity.

I had wanted to set up a system to prevent hail and early frost damage mostly for my stone fruits. I am of the opinion that I would do well to put a layer of protection above all my trees for the purpose of preventing desiccation and reducing sun intensity. I think now I would do well to include a misting system as well.

I'd like some tips on succeeding with my persimmons and pawpaws. Am I asking too much?


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Persimmon and pawpaw faliure

milehighgirl,
What were the coldest temperatures there last Winter?Pawpaws I think,can take around -25F.Was it the cold that killed them?Maybe they can be wrapped with something during that time.
It's true,they grow better in a humid environment. Brady


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RE: Persimmon and pawpaw faliure

Probably composting and wrapping would get your paw paws through the winter. I am in zone 7 and I planted two peterson paw paw trees last fall and they appear to be doing fine. In the altitudes of CO you may be getting a more intensive sunlight therefore since paw paws are sensitive to untraviolet rays, you may want to screen them for a couple of years after transplanting.

For persimmons, pick a cultivar suitable to the CO climate. Persimmons do not take variations in climate (rain and heat) well after blooming and sometimes drop a lot of their fruit. An American persimmon that is good for CO will be your best producer.


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RE: Persimmon and pawpaw faliure

MG,

In addition to above posts, you also can plant them in a 15 gallon pots and overwinter in your garage for a year or two to get them establish before putting them in the ground. I did this with some of my Asian persimmons.

Tony


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RE: Persimmon and pawpaw faliure

I've too have been struggling to grow persimmons and pawpaws at the northern limit of their range here in Minnesota. My "Meader" persimmon has had severe winter dieback every year since it was planted in 2010, and my "Sunflower" pawpaw survived two winters but gave up the ghost this spring.

I'm going to try again next year, but this time I will be ordering from Oikos Tree Crops; they are supposed to have developed some of the most cold-hardy varieties of pawpaws and persimmons around.

Here is a link that might be useful: Oikos Tree Crops


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RE: Persimmon and pawpaw faliure

MG - You may want to try pawpaw seeds this fall. The plants dont liek root disterbance, so that plus planting in fall may have just been too much.

They also need shade for the first few years. Im not sure about up that high, but one could assume maybe not putting them in full sun, its a bit more intense up in CO.

Sowing the seeds in fall directly into the ground will ensure no root disterbance, and allow the massive tap root to go deep in search for water.


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RE: Persimmon and pawpaw faliure

I have done everything suggested on this thread. Pawpaw absolutely cannot handle the sun here but I figured that since they are hardy to -25F I should be fine through the winter. I think the problem is that when it gets down below zero here it is usually dry also. Basically I think my pawpaw must have been freeze-dried during it's first winter outside, and since it was in a pot for four years it probably had not established a good tap root.

nick_b79,

Thanks for the link. I think I will get some seedling pawpaw established and then try to graft onto them once they are more mature. I think putting a mister on the trees at least in the evening would help also. We hardly ever have dew here.

canadianplant,

Where can one purchase pawpaw seeds?


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RE: Persimmon and pawpaw faliure

mhg.
Y'all get cold - but your cold is MUCH different from ours, over here in the east.
I've been in CO in Jan, and yes, it was cold - but DRY and not overly uncomfortable. Same temps here would probably be accompanied by much higher humidity, and would be uncomfortable.
I was amazed to see ranchers there with big stacks of hay outside, uncovered - if we tried that here, we'd have a huge sodden, moldy mountain of spoiled feed.
Wonder if winter dessication of above-ground tissues might not be an issue - spraying with Wilt-Pruf or wrapping to guard against dessication might be in order.


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RE: Persimmon and pawpaw faliure

I had never been through Kentucky or Tennessee during the summer (and never Georgia and Florida at all) I thought I could never in my life be tired of rain. When it rains here I usually go outside and do a little dance and let myself get drenched. Then 10 minutes later, when the rain stops, I dry off instantly. I realize now why our weather forecasts say "scattered thunderstorms", and not rain. I never knew the difference before. Sounds naive I guess:) Driving though Tennessee last week I finally had enough rain, but what I missed most were blue skies. (and just for the record, people in Atlanta drive like maniacs!)

I 'm glad that I am realizing that I've been asking too much of some plants. Until now I didn't realize how vastly different their native climate is. I'll be babying them more now that I know how dry it really is here.

On the bright side, I hardly have to spray anything and never need mosquito repellent. Now sunscreen is another matter!


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RE: Persimmon and pawpaw faliure

For the pawpaws find a place selling potted plants. Pawpaws hate getting their roots disturbed and potted plants are much more likely to get established. Several places sell potted pawpaws, Forest Keeling and Raintree come to mind. Persimmons are also unhappy about moving and again potted plants are worth considering there if you can find them. It wouldn't hurt to throw some wilt-pruf on them as well for the first season or two.

Scott


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RE: Persimmon and pawpaw faliure

milehighgirl,
If it's still your desire to try growing Pawpaws again,I could send a few.They will be starting their second year next Spring.
There are three varieties,all started from seeds.One from a tree in Fremont,CA,the only one I've tried,and was very good and the owner said was a cross of Corwin Davis and a local San Jose grower's.Also plants from seeds sent to me by Benny L. from Tennessee and some from the Kentucky Champion.
Let me know,as I have too many.
Springtime I think is best to plant them,because if the roots are damaged,they are actively growing and can recuperate more easily. Brady


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RE: Persimmon and pawpaw faliure

Scott,

Sounds like Wilt-Pruf will be my best friend. My original pawpaws came potted from One Green World and did very well until I let them dry too much. One recovered and I put it in a pot in the ground this winter and that did it in. I now have 2 babies from Forrest Keeling that are doing well in the shade next to my house. I am afraid to plant them but I know that would be best in the long run.

Bradybb,

I'm up for a trade. I have had good success so far rooting figs and won't know what to do with them all.


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RE: Persimmon and pawpaw faliure

Milehigh-

In Madison, WI there are a couple paw paws that must be closing in on 10 years old... Not sure how cold they've been, but i'm sure well below zero.

Your climate is one of extremes. In reality, once a tree goes dormant, the cold isn't what is doing the damage (up until a point), its the warmth that comes along to break up the cold spells...after that another cold shot is going to do a lot more damage. MSU had a great article on this...

MSU


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RE: Persimmon and pawpaw faliure

milehighgirl,
That's sounds like a good deal.Let's keep in touch.I think Spring is the best time to do something like that. Brady


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RE: Persimmon and pawpaw faliure

  • Posted by skyjs z8 OR, USA (My Page) on
    Sat, Jul 13, 13 at 13:31

Hi Milehighgirl,
I also live in a dry summer climate. My paw paws and persimmons have suffered in the summer when it was hot and dry. My apples, quinces, figs and mulberries don't seem to notice. I would keep them well watered in the summer as well so they are stronger going into the winter.
THansk
John S
PDX OR


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RE: Persimmon and pawpaw faliure

skyjs,

To me Portland has always seemed a lush paradise, I have a hard time imagining it to be dry there. Since I've never had a pawpaw before I sure hope I like them if I ever do get any!


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RE: Persimmon and pawpaw faliure

skyjs,

To me Portland has always seemed a lush paradise, I have a hard time imagining it to be dry there. Since I've never had a pawpaw before I sure hope I like them if I ever do get any!


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RE: Persimmon and pawpaw faliure

Milehigh,

Since you've never tasted them before I highly recommend ordering a box of fresh pawpaws from Integration Acres in Ohio. They're usually available September/October and are really delicious. If you've ever had a perfectly ripe cherimoya, that's just about the closest you can come to describing the taste of pawpaws. Anyway, if you do order some you'll get a few dozen seeds to plant as a bonus!

http://integrationacres.com/index.htm


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RE: Persimmon and pawpaw faliure

Milehighgirl;
I have had some limited success in a similar climate, but it is still a little early to tell. I planted an NC-1 pawpaw and a seedling from Raintree 2 springs ago. For shade I stitched a burlap sack onto a tomato cage and used that to provide cover. For my pawpaws the biggest thing that got them through the summer was water frequently and use lots of mulch. In the winter the temps went to about -10F and they survived.
Anyway this last spring both of my pawpaws were coming out of dormancy when all of the sudden the NC-1 died at the graft. It was weird it was starting to bud and break dormancy when all of the sudden it was just dead. It was coming on earlier and I suspect that it might have come out too soon and then got frozen by a late frost.
I ordered another plant and didn't realize that the roots were still alive until I dug it up and saw that the roots had suckers under the soil line. Anyway I have heard of other people having problems with grafted varieties so I planted another seedling.
The new seedling is getting shade while the older pawpaw is now in full sunlight with additional light reflecting off of my white house and a bleached fence. It has a little sun burn on it from the past month when the temps were in the low 100's, but most of the leaves are ok. The top leaves kind of sacrifice themselves by shading the bottom leaves. I know about this guy in the news from Madrid Idaho that sells pawpaws at the farmers market that is also in a similar climate, so it must be possible. Just google (madrid id pawpaw).
Last I have never tried a pawpaw but if they taste like a good cherimoya watch out I might just plant an orchard of them!


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RE: Persimmon and pawpaw faliure

I've been pondering this native climate issue and am now wondering what the native climate is for Asian persimmons. This sounds sort of backwards but since my Rosseyanka is fairing better than the American ones, is the native climate for Asian persimmons less humid than the American ones? Would I have a better chance with astringent or non-astringent?


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RE: Persimmon and pawpaw faliure

MHG - You can try seedrack.com or ebay, make sure theyre fresh and shipped in moist peat.


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RE: Persimmon and pawpaw faliure

I have a paw paw (very small) that i mail ordered earlier this spring...it came with a few leaves, but since all of them have fallen off..i figured it was dead, but in the past 2 weeks some small leaves have popped out..so i continue to water. I think it was transplant shock...


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RE: Persimmon and pawpaw faliure

MHG;
I agree, I planted a Saijo persimmon this spring and it seems to be loving all of the heat we have been getting.
Anyways I think the biggest problem we have with persimmons is that the growing season in the mountain west tends to be about 30 days shorter than similar climate zones in the mid west and in the east. On the other hand our summers tend to be hotter and ripen fruit sooner, time will tell if this is enough.
Last are your figs in ground or in pots? I have a Hardy Chicago that is in ground and this coming winter will be its first.


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RE: Persimmon and pawpaw faliure

gregkdc1,

I had requested to be notified when Smith's Best and Great Wall were available from Just Fruits and Exotics. Well she called me yesterday to let me know they were available and I found my mouth saying, "Yes, please", and my brain was saying "what are you thinking?" I think these two ripen early.

I agree that the sun makes a huge difference in fruit ripening and brix. Last year was my first for getting Green Gage plums and they were out of this world. When I read about all the spraying and rot problems that plagues the East I have to say that being in a dry climate does have it's advantages.

With regard to my figs, I planted one Chicago Hardy outside next to my foundation and then entombed it with cinder blocks. It survived just fine. It is not growing as quickly as my potted one that I brought in the garage for the winter but I think it may be due to the type of soil, and I haven't fertilized it either. I'm going to keep experimenting with them. I got scion and have started a lot of figs so I will be able to find what works without too much risk.

Keeping the potted plants moist in the winter had proved to be a problem but I solved it last year. I took milk cartons and froze water in them then cut out the bottom and placed them in the pot. This allowed the water to absorb slowly into the soil. I didn't loose a single fig this winter, so now I don't know if it's worth it to plant outside or not. Keeping the garaged trees watered was difficult but this method really helped.


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RE: Persimmon and pawpaw faliure

Milehigh,
... Going back a bit in thread, I don't think the Asian persimmon is native to a more arid climate than the American. The latter occurs as far west as the Texas panhandle...

But the Asian is a truly cultivated plant, while the American is really still a wild one with some named cultivars selected from the wild and/or bred in recent years. Another thing to consider is where the named cultivars of American persimmon where selected. Something from Maryland is not going to be as tolerant of aridity as something from Oklahoma.


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RE: Persimmon and pawpaw faliure

My Asian persimmon bloomed and set profusely last year - which was a cool summer. I live near the Ca. coast - with ocean influence. This year - so far - has been much warmer - and the persimmon isn't fruiting well. It has taken a long time to even produce here, but am wondering if it isn't an alternate year heavy/light producing type tree.

For what it's worth, planting a taller tree - perhaps apricot near by to help shade the persimmon - might be helpful. I have had to prune out my trees rather severely in order to get more sunlight in my cooler climate to those that need it.

bejay


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RE: Persimmon and pawpaw faliure

Persimmons (Asian and American) should really have no problem with heat, bright sunlight, and low humidity. They do very well in Albuquerque, NM for example. American should not have any problem with Denver's winters either.

Pawpaws on the other hand, are certainly challenged by the bright sunlight and low humidity, as they are certainly way out of their element in the arid West. But again, cold alone should not be a limiting factor where you are. There is at least one person on this forum growing Pawpaws successfully in Colorado Springs, who chimed in on a post I made seeking hope for the plant in my area...


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RE: Persimmon and pawpaw faliure

I'm not ready to give up on pawpaws yet, or persimmons for that matter. This spring was unprecedented and so many of us lost crops and trees. Seeing what the SE is like in summer did really give me a lot to think about. I think that if I had kept the trees from England's in the garage this winter it would have been better.

gregkdc1,

I have baby figs on my in-ground fig but not the potted yet.


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RE: Persimmon and pawpaw faliure

I just read about Milehighgirl's problems with pawpaws and just have to jump into the discussion. I lost a young grafted Wabash to the sun in June when the shade cloth blew off. I discovered the poor plant within about two hours but the sun damage was fatal and irreversible. This plant I was told, could take some sun here. I also have a 3 year old Summer Delight pawpaw that gets full morning sun within 3 feet of the location of the now graft-killed Wabash. The Summer Delight has no cover and shows just slight stress from direct sun. My evidence has shown me it takes between 2 and 3 growing seasons for a pawpaw to tolerate direct sun. After 3 years growing, they take much more direct sun but still can get some minor burn in direct sun on the hottest 100 degree days. My pawpaws that are 6-10 feet tall are actually reaching over the top of the canopy of peach trees to get full sun. These are over 5 years old and do not burn at all, but did some 2 years ago. They seem to like sun now. I would say that success with pawpaws in the mountain west is getting them through the first 3-4 years. After that, they really are well established and acclimated to the climate. They have shown me over the past 8-10 years how well they have adapted to my warm microclimate in Colorado Springs.


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RE: Persimmon and pawpaw faliure

Ivywild142,

I did have my pawpaw garaged for the first 4 years, and this winter was the first I had planted outside (again, not a good spring). I may just try Summer Delight. Today I noticed that it seems my 5-year-old tree may be putting out suckers so I might have something to graft onto. This would make me happy.


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RE: Persimmon and pawpaw faliure

While this is not on topic regarding persimmons and pawpaws, I have decided that Actinidia kolomicta kiwi are not making it here either. For that last 3 years I have been trying them out but it seems that even the least bit of warm, dry weather will take them out. They are winter hardy here, but not summer hardy. I'm debating whether or not to try Actinidia arguta or give up on them completely.

I read Scott's page regarding these and he says, "I had more of these but my kids never liked them, they have a "green bean" component to the flavor". I do have shady places they could go, it's just a matter of whether they will survive both the arid heat and cold of Colorado


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RE: Persimmon and pawpaw faliure

Hardy kiwis have not shown promise for me in New Mexico yet either... but in addition to needing lots of watering, the problem seems to be major die back from late spring freezes. This is a well-known phenomenon... I won't be buying any more of these vines in the future either.

In regards to the Idaho pawpaw tip, I looked it up, and it seems to be "Meridian" Idaho, not "Madrid" Idaho. Meridian is in the greater Boise area, with a climate quite similar to Denver's. Boise is actually a tad drier, hotter on average in midsummer, among other minor differences. Climate data for any western town is easy to find by googling for example "Boise climate summary" and clicking on the wrcc.dri.edu link.


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RE: Persimmon and pawpaw faliure

fabaceae_native,

That is a great tip. I did a search and found a really interesting article. I may try to contact Jan Huskey and hopefully pick his brain!

Here is a link that might be useful: In Awe of the Pawpaw


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RE: Persimmon and pawpaw faliure

fabaceae_native,

Oops, I was so interested in the article I forgot to ask you if you have tried kolomikta or arguta, or have you decided not to keep trying with kiwis at all?


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RE: Persimmon and pawpaw faliure

Mile highgirl - Excellent article; the man is after my own heart. I have two peterson paw paws, two jujubes, three types of peach, two types of asian pear, a persimmon, a cherry tree, two cherry bushes, two raspberry bushes, a blue berry bush, two goji berry bushes, two noneyberry bushes, three artic kiwi vines and three fuzzy kiwi vines and four figs. I am looking for room to add a pomagranite. In there somewhere, I have a vegetable garden. All of this in a yard of normal 1/4 acre size. All of this is probably due to my inability to focus.


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RE: Persimmon and pawpaw faliure

CharlieBoring,

All of this is probably due to my inability to focus.

I have the same problem. I haven't taken a recent count but I'm sure I'm close to 70 trees and shrubs. It's fun when the fruit starts pouring in!


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RE: Persimmon and pawpaw faliure

I tried both arguta (lasted a year or two), and now kolomikta, which are still alive, but died way back with late spring frosts, and seem to be very needy of water...

Glad you found some interesting reading on pawpaws!


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RE: Persimmon and pawpaw faliure

fabaceae_native,

Thanks for the advice. I don't like to give up on things but in this case the kiwis will go but not the pawpaws or persimmons.


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RE: Persimmon and pawpaw faliure

  • Posted by skyjs z8 OR, USA (My Page) on
    Thu, Jul 25, 13 at 15:26

I bet you get more rain in between July and October than we do here in Portland, milehighgirl. We don't get thunderstorms. The pawpaw and persimmon get most of their rain in the summer, as they do in the East where they're from. We are bone dry in the summer. It hasn't rained for a month and it probably wont' for a month or two more. THis is why I suggest summer watering. Mine were suffering a bit until I watered them more in the summer.

All kiwi do well here, but arctic kiwi will bake here in full sun. I just give them a few hours of morning sun, afternoon shade, and make sure they have lots of water.

I just think we need to acclimate them to what they're used to until they somewhat grow up.
John S
PDX OR


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RE: Persimmon and pawpaw faliure

skyjs,

It is so dry here that I would not consider planting anything except cactus without the intention of watering. My potted trees get watered daily and my in-ground trees get deep watered for at least 3 hours per week, using a pvc drip system.

Our average precipitating is 1.2" per month, with May being the wettest with 2.6". I looked up data on Portland and found it interesting that you don't get much rain in the summer. I've only visited the PNW in the summer and I am always amazed at how green and lush everything is. So how does anything survive without irrigation there, or are crops normally irrigated using the water from the incredible Willamette? (Sure wish we had the Willamette here instead of the Platte!)


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RE: Persimmon and pawpaw faliure

  • Posted by skyjs z8 OR, USA (My Page) on
    Fri, Jul 26, 13 at 1:19

The trees are lush because they have deep roots. We get 40 inches of rain or so, but almost all of it happens between Oct 1 and July 1. Native plants adapt to what they've evolved with. We don't get the brutal sun of some places, so the evaporation isn't as high as some places, plus, we get way more snow in the mountains here than you do, so the rivers water everything.
John S
PDX OR


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RE: Persimmon and pawpaw faliure

milehighgirl, You are from Iowa I take it? Don't give up on the pawpaw or persimmon. Water is your problem with pawpaw and bare root persimmon instead of potted is your problem with persimmon. I live in Iowa also and I have a grove of 30 grafted pawpaws growing but it would not be possible without heavily watering them the past two years. I also know of a native pawpaw patch growing near my house. I reccomend getting your persimmon from Stark Bros. They only have Prok and Yates American persimmons and they are both great and set fruit without a male pollinator. They also come in heavy deep root pots. Don't attempt any hybrid other than Rosseyanka or any pure Kaki. Without extensive intervention the odds are stacked against you. I have had very minimal success with bare root persimmons but my potted specimens are growing like weeds even during this drought. I got most of my pawpaws from Forrest Keeling Nursery who will ship the trees to you in the fall, small but potted with tons of roots and these trees take off the following spring. If you go bare root when it comes to pawpaw, I recommend Nolin River Nursery or Englands Orchard and Nursery. The advantage with pawpaws being potted is that the delicate root system doesn't get damaged or dry out. Pawpaw roots are the most fleshy and sensitive roots on a tree you'd ever tangle with. Baby those roots, give them plenty of water, and DO NOT let them dry out for moment. Persimmon roots are a little tougher but I think most bare root nurseries don't send enough of the roots or the roots were previously dried out. Hope this helps.


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RE: Persimmon and pawpaw faliure

treebird,

I am in Denver. I have pretty much done everything you suggest. I'm not giving up yet and plan to baby them even more than I had. Humidity may be the missing element as they have been watered well.


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RE: Persimmon and pawpaw faliure

Oh I gotcha, I recall reading a thread where you were looking for trees that your aunt could grow in Iowa. I got a little mixed up. Good luck and don't give up : )


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RE: Persimmon and pawpaw faliure

When I went on vacation this yr. a friend of my husbands house sat for us. When we returned she had found a pawpaw tree on our property, but not a second one to pollinate it. So we went to e-bay and bought 4 striated seeds, 2 of them are growing! I was just about to plant them outside before fall so they could get their roots going. They are just 5+ inches tall and have only 5 or 6 leaves. After reading where some of you have had your trees in the garage for YEARS I'm wondering if I shouldn't wait. Then again, don't they need to get their tap roots deeper than a pot will allow? I'm afraid I'll forget to water it in the garage. Although our winters don't get that cold, won't the roots get too cold in a pot instead of the ground? Since one is growing wild, am I wrong in thinking it will do find with lots of mulch, in the shade of an already established tree?


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RE: Persimmon and pawpaw faliure

There is a guy that's familiar with them and he posted that there is no problem leaving them in a container.The roots may circle,but that doesn't seem to matter.
But the soil should be kept moist.
They could be planted outside.I did it in the Fall and they are still growing.I'm in Zone 8 though,so that might make a difference.The little ones need a bit of shade for year or two.
How big is the wild one? Brady


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RE: Persimmon and pawpaw faliure

My pawpaws survived the garage better than outside, but this spring was not one to go by, at least I hope not. I found an easy way to keep my trees watered in the garage. I froze 1/2 gallon milk or OJ containers with water and then once they were solid I cut the bottom off or put holes in the bottom, then just sat them in the pot. This allowed the water to absorb slowly without running down and out and make a mess on the garage floor.


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RE: Persimmon and pawpaw faliure

milehighgirl,
There is one guy ( �"митрий Эдуардович ) who grows paw paw seedlings in Volgograd, its 48 degrees north and semi-arid/dry steppe type of climate.


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RE: Persimmon and pawpaw faliure

Here is the link where this paw paw is pictured:
http://forum.vinograd.info/showthread.php?t=3890&page=18


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RE: Persimmon and pawpaw faliure

The pawpaws like the company of other plants and really thrive in the company of other trees. Mine are all partly in the canopy of nearby fruit trees. I have tried to put them in a location which is most like their forest home. I have 9 trees on my smallish lot in Colorado Springs. These have all been doing fine. I did lose a tiny Wabash tree from Forest Keeling that could not take the sun. I have found Forest Keeling plants to be a year younger and smaller than grafted plants from OGW or Edible Landscaping. The tiny plants require 2 full years of protection here, while the larger grafted plants adjust in less than a year. They cost more, but are worth the price. I water them every day or two in their first year and less as they get older. For sun protection I have a broken window screen over them their first year. They like an east or northerly exposure where they get a few hours of direct sun, but not a lot more. They simply cannot handle all day full sun out in an exposed location. They are good near the walls of houses and do not have invasive roots like many trees would.
Hardy kiwi are really hard to establish in Colorado. They fry in much sun and are very frost tender in spring. They also have zero drought tolerance. Have finally gotten a female to grow and thrive here having it climb up an asian pear next to an east wall. Have had many fail to live and am hoping the male I have will start to grow. Lost quite a few kiwi before finding what they want- Moist shady locations protected from spring freezes, and summer heat. Hope this helps prevent others from future failure. Kiwi and pawpaw aren't easy in CO but given what they must have, they can grow.


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RE: Persimmon and pawpaw faliure

I am in northern Virginia (zone 7a) and I received my Shenandoah, Susquehanna from Edible Landscape last fall in late October. I transplanted them immediatedly into their final locations in my backyard, where they get about 7 hours of sun a day. They were about 18 inches tall; they survived the winter; and are now about 2 feet tall. I hope they devoted their first year's energy to developing their taproot. I believe that paw paws will prosper outside even in zone 6, maybe 5. I also have Anna hardy kiwis that have not yet fruited after 10 years. I believe the problem is that I have not pruned them properly. I planted fuzzy kiwis to run up my pergola this past spring and now am crossing my fingers in hope that the winter does not kill them. See the photo. I also have a fuyu persimmon tree that produces a massive number of persimmons, but I usually get a lot of June/July drop off.


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RE: Persimmon and pawpaw faliure

Ivywild142,

I can't agree more with everything you said. I have decided that my pawpaw are going to be planted on the NE side of my house where they will get only morning sun. I also had the same experience with Forrest Keeling. The trees came in 4" pots. They grew fine this year but for winter they are garages with my figs and persimmons.

CharlieBoring,

I think your weather is more temperate than here in Colorado. Last spring we had a 7F temperature drop in April and 6" of snow in May. My paw paw just could not take the drastic weather changes. Maybe if I can keep them better protected they will be fine once they are older. For now I am treating them as I do my figs in the winter.

Maybe next spring will be better.


 o
RE: Persimmon and pawpaw faliure

Just got burned fro Stark Brothers nursery. Sold me a Prok persimmon select tree and two weeks later told me they were sold out. Maybe should have mentioned this before I paid.... Now having a tough time finding any in stock at the other stores. Be care with these jokers.


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