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Making TangO's Great,

Posted by harvestman 6 (My Page) on
Sat, Aug 9, 14 at 9:35

or really good anyway (it's all so subjective). This year I decided to thin them as if they were going to be big peaches- 1 peach to about 8", and the first results indicate that they are back to being as good the first time I tasted them- an extraordinary peach of high quality.

They are such vigorous trees that I find they need a lot of summer pruning to keep the canopy from way overgrowing the bearing wood. Also, their texture in not like any other peach I've eaten. They have a firmness that some have described as rubbery, but that sounds negative and most find the texture quite appealing- but so is the texture of a traditional luscious freestone peach. That quality is common to hundreds of varieties when ripened on the tree, however.

I've not had time to really try it out but it must be very useful as a culinary peach. It has tang with that sweet and holds its texture well when cooked.


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Making TangO's Great,

Because of what you and Olpea have said in the past, I ordered one of these this spring and planted it for my 7 year old nephew, in his grandfathers back yard. I plan to graft an additional variety or two to extend the harvest and also get some melting type on the tree too. I am so looking forward to trying this peach!


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RE: Making TangO's Great,

  • Posted by fruitnut z7b-8a,4500ft SW TX (My Page) on
    Sat, Aug 9, 14 at 10:58

My second leaf tree was moved this past winter and is now a whopping 42 inches tall. It's been on a "diet" and is right where I want it. Loaded with fruit buds so maybe next yr.

I forget all those textures the breeders have been talking about lately. Seems like there was a hard or rubbery in there somewhere. This must fit in one of those.


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RE: Making TangO's Great,

I tasted Tangos from a farmer's market, not home grown, tree-ripening ones. To me, the texture fits the description of "rubbery" although it tastes good.

I prefer the taste and texture of Saturn over Tangos when it comes to donut peaches. Again, I may not compare apple to apple (or peach to peach). And as you say, taste is very subjective.


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RE: Making TangO's Great,

Yes, many love the Saturns, but it is so so wet and has no acid bite whatsoever. A peach farmer once told me that it was mostly women who gravitated towards his white peaches but I've not really noticed this tendency.

Folks raised in the tropics or on a lot of tropical fruit seem more likely to like the least acidic stuff whether they be male or female. I'm guessing if you are raised in a household that kept the fridge stocked with corn sweetened soft drinks you might develop a taste for the most sugary fruit but there would probably be people who loved pure sweet in fruit no matter what.

I ate a perfect White Lady peach today and was reminded of what low acid can mean.

Around here, the wasps, squirrels, birds and brown rot really favor Saturn.


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RE: Making TangO's Great,

This year I am really letting my TangOs hang late and they are coming in more juicy and less rubbery. The only problem is they are highly prone to rotting compared with the other peaches coming in now, and they are also more prone to spotting. My Ernies Choice is right next to it and it has perfect spot and rot free fruits all over it.

So, I have revised my opinion up on the eating quality if let to hang till darker yellow, but lowered my opinion on grow ability. I actually kept more fruits on it than past years because I felt I wasn't getting enough peach given how these peento shapes are smaller.

Scott


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RE: Making TangO's Great,

I haven't sprayed mine for about 4 weeks and in spite of heavy dew and some normal rain the rot hasn't been a factor- humidity and heat has been down though. Also I don't need a texture like all the other peaches and if I did I could soften it inside as it is plenty sweet while still fairly firm.

Earnie's is a long ways from ripe here. Great flavor, but such a short season. Last year it was over in a week.


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RE: Making TangO's Great,

  • Posted by olpea zone 6 KS (My Page) on
    Sat, Aug 9, 14 at 21:14

" The only problem is they are highly prone to rotting compared with the other peaches coming in now, and they are also more prone to spotting."

Yes. I have the same problem with this peach when it rains significantly. The skin gets all spotty.

I do like the peach though. I didn't have many this year, and gave one to a customer who described it as a peach with a rich flavor. I thought that was a good description.

In spite of the grow problems, I ordered another 5 more of this variety for next year.

Nobody ever talks about TangOs II. It's supposed to have a unique flavor. Mine haven't fruited yet. If anyone has fruited it, I'd like to hear comments.

I'm w/ Hman as far as white peaches. Seems like the older I get the less I get excited about them. Had my first Sweet Cap the other day. It was good for a white donut, but still didn't wow me like a good yellow peach. Lady Nancy is a good white peach, which has some refreshing bite of a yellow.


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RE: Making TangO's Great,

  • Posted by bob_z6 6b/7a SW CT (My Page) on
    Sun, Aug 10, 14 at 3:06

I had a lot of problems with brown rot on my TangOs this year. I started getting it very early, maybe a month and a half before they were ripe. I frequently picked off the rotting fruit to keep the inoculation down, but it was a losing battle. I also lost plenty to bugs (in spite of surround) and animals (both birds and furry ones) and ended up picking the last 7 on August 1st. Several of those started to rot while on my counter over the next 2-3 days.

On the positive, if you catch the fruit just as it is starting to rot (and cut out the rot), it is pretty tasty. I measured brix anywhere from 12-16, with the 14-16 ones pretty good (strong flavor, firm, with some juice). The 12ish brix ones are a bit on the tart side, with a very firm, dryer texture. I probably need fungicides (and to step up animal trapping) to have success with these.

I haven't seen any TangOs at the farmers market this year, but I did get some BuenOs (the vendor wasn't sure if it was I or II). They were firm, but not the rubbery texture I like in TangOs, with a mild flavor, and low acid. 13-15 brix. OK, but not great. Of course, they were far better than the Rising Star which I got from the same vendor (8-9 brix, OK flavor with some acid).

Here's a pic of my TangO's harvest (3rd year tree), which totaled around a quart, not counting the half rotted fruits (which I sometimes salvage).


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RE: Making TangO's Great,

It seems like a tree not to grow without the use of a fungicide. Try a shot of Monterey Fungus Fighter a month before they ripen- or graft it over. It would be a great mother tree.


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RE: Making TangO's Great,

I haven't seen rot on my TangOs yet, but then again Ive never had any brown rot on Saturn either. I'm pretty sure its because they are grown in pots on concrete. Mine are pretty small this year and do have spots on them as did the Flat Wonderful. Saturn didn't get any of that. I found TangOs to be rubbery last year, but reading what others have said, they were probably picked too early. I'll let them hang.


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RE: Making TangO's Great,

Aside from having a shape that collects rain water and even heavy dew, the Mango peach (I prefer that name so that's what I'm calling it in my nursery) grown in rich soil in the humid regions is a pretty rank grower of vegetative wood. If first mornings sun doesn't hit the fruit it is a generous host to fungus.


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RE: Making TangO's Great,

I sprayed MFF a month ago, it was very helpful on my other peaches but less so on TangOs. I just picked the ones I was letting hang and 2/3 were rotted. I had a few varieties in the past that seemed to have worse rot, but TangOs is near the top in terms of susceptibility. With multiple MFF sprays it would probably be fine.

Scott

PS heres a picture along with some Ernies Choice, Carman, and Satsuma plums.

This post was edited by scottfsmith on Sun, Aug 10, 14 at 11:27


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RE: Making TangO's Great,

I used pristine.


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RE: Making TangO's Great,

  • Posted by olpea zone 6 KS (My Page) on
    Sun, Aug 10, 14 at 23:59

I've used Pristine and Indar and still some of my TangOs look like Bob's or Scott's spotted ones. Happened both this year and last year, but both years we've received a goodly amount of rain during their ripening.


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RE: Making TangO's Great,

Spotted isn't so bad for a home grower but I guess we can put Mango in the very fussy class and is maybe not a good peach for most home growers, although it hasn't been all that hard for me here. I do admit that a much higher number of peaches are flawed in one way or another, including being split clear through the seed cavity. It is also the only peach on my property for years where some early ripening fruit had worms.


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RE: Making TangO's Great,

I grew Tango in pots. Never had any rot problems, very little spotting. I spray early on for fungus.....have to down here. I think they are very good and remind me of mango in taste and texture. The potted Tangos went to Louisiana last winter full of fruit spurs. I have 2 in ground here, same age, hardly any fruit spurs. I found 1 peach during my summer pruning that had been at the top of the tree. Very few blooms and only one fruit between 2 trees. If the in ground trees don't do better next year, I am going back to pots for that variety.

Side note, my Santa Barbara peaches were delicious. Very sweet and very peachy. Most of the low chill peaches I have grown usually are very sweet, but not very peachy. The Santa Barbara is both, and freestone. No problems with them either, but I do spray.


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RE: Making TangO's Great,

The thing is, it is such a uniquely flavored and textured peach. I don't think it needs to be held on the tree at all- who needs another peach with melting texture? Firm is a better description than rubbery as far as I'm concerned.

It is also capable of getting high sugar in shady conditions, which I discovered today when I ate one from a tree at a site that is definitely on the cusp of shady. The lack of good light exposure didn't seem to affect the sugar at all.


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RE: Making TangO's Great,

Mine are on the small side. No thinning=tiny fruits. This things like to set fruit! Had a decent number last year too.

Kids ate 5 of them...i picked the ripest ones i could find. Very nice this year. Not noticing the rubber i did last year.

 photo IMG_2112.jpg

 photo IMG_2113.jpg


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RE: Making TangO's Great,

  • Posted by olpea zone 6 KS (My Page) on
    Tue, Aug 12, 14 at 22:19

Beautiful looking fruit Frank.


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RE: Making TangO's Great,

Looks delicious Frank. Have you ever wonder what a cross between Saturn and TangOs tastes like? Frank, that could be your next project!

Tony


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RE: Making TangO's Great,

They are beautiful thats for sure, but they remind me of earmuffs on a tree. Sorry, they are funny looking. Great tree! Mrs. G


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