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Bagging Grapes

Posted by MrsG47 7 RI (My Page) on
Fri, Aug 30, 13 at 11:27

I've just read a slew of articles on protecting grapes and helping them to ripen evenly. Purdue and book from the 1800's came up with the same solution. Bag your grapes (Concord in my case) and in a sturdy paper bag. Has anyone done this on a small scale? Where would I get such bag? The supermarket? Thanks, Mrs. G


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RE: Bagging Grapes

  • Posted by eboone 6a - SW PA (My Page) on
    Fri, Aug 30, 13 at 12:07

I have not done this (might consider it though) but you can buy large packs of brown 'lunch bags' cheaply - if they are too big just trim them down. My grape clusters would fit in them nicely, I think.
How do they handle heavy rain, though? How were the bags secured onto the cluster of grapes in your reading?


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RE: Bagging Grapes

I bagged a couple clusters last year just to try it and it worked great for keeping the yellow jackets off, but made more problems with earwigs. Dollar tree will has brown paper lunch bags for a buck. All I did was fold the end over the stem and stapled it shut, the bags held up ok in the rain. As long as the bags don't get moved around a lot they keep their shape and eventually dry out. In the end I didn't feel it was worth it, it is just easier for me to remove a few chewed up grapes from the cluster instead of bagging them.


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RE: Bagging Grapes

What I also discovered is that the suggestion of 'waxed paper bags helps with rain. I think I'll give bagging grapes a try.


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RE: Bagging Grapes

Before people started using ziplocks on apples, they used paper bags, stapling them as described.


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RE: Bagging Grapes

We are using bags on our grapes this year as an experiment. Waxed lunch bags and organza bags. We put them on when grapes were small, about pea size. We used waxed lunch bags on Concord only and they were not so easy to put on. We ordered organza bags after and it was so much easier.
So far, bunches look great in their organza bags (moss green). We are going to try some this weekend. But paper bags are only on Concord and need to wait a bit longer.
The unbagged bunches we left for an experiment were gone as soon as they changed color. Birds, I guess
We will let you know a bit later how Concord in wax bags vs organza bags turned out.

We have about 100 bunches, wasn't difficult to bag them
Reliance on photo, ate them all already


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RE: Bagging Grapes

Canadice, we will try this weekend


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RE: Bagging Grapes

Tigkrit! Prettiest grapes in bags i've ever seen? Are the bags from MIchaels craft shop? Please let me know where I can buy them. They're going on the Concords tomorrow am.! Thanks a bunch, pun intended. Mrs. G


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RE: Bagging Grapes

Just ordered the bags on line, they'll be here in four days. thanks so much Tigrikt.


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RE: Bagging Grapes

I'm a big fan of the organza bag method. If you Google there are places that sell them in bulk for cheap, e.g. yourorganzabag.com.

This year I decided to put my bags on a couple days too late -- I went out with the bags and all I had was stems left.

Scott


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RE: Bagging Grapes

Scott, that is the company I ordered from. Can't wait till they arrive. I bookmarked their site as I know I'll be back. Mrs. G


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RE: Bagging Grapes

I believe we ordered from the side that Scott suggested above. 6x9.
It seems that bags added an additional protection against fungus. Not completely sure.


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RE: Bagging Grapes

  • Posted by bob_z6 6b/7a SW CT (My Page) on
    Sat, Aug 31, 13 at 22:21

This is the 2nd year I've bagged grapes with ziplocks (corners cut off, just like for apples). The vines were left by the previous owners and I think they are Concords (but am not sure). Last year bagging (in late June) seemed to make a big difference with black rot. The bagged ones were fine until racoons ate them all in August, while the un-bagged ones rotted in early July.

This year I took care of the racoons, but it didn't make much difference. Both bagged and un-bagged rotted alike. Maybe un-bagged bunches were a bit worse, but it was almost a total loss anyway.

Last year I added a potted Mars vine, which is supposedly resistant to black rot. Based on what I saw, it is. The 2nd year plant produced 5-6 bunches of grapes with no sprays at all. They were tasty, not super sweet at 13.5 brix, but with an interesting flavor (a bit of muscadine). Of course, the location and that it is potted may have impacted the disease resistance (positively). Even so, I've attempted to top-work my Concord vines into Mars.

Left to right: Concord (un-bagged), Mars (un-bagged) Mars (bagged)


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