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Fruit-picking ladder?

Posted by nygardener z6 New York (My Page) on
Sun, Oct 16, 11 at 4:20

What sort of ladder do you use for picking? I used an ordinary stepladder last weekend to try to harvest high-up apples and took a nasty fall, even though I was standing only a few feet off the ground. Tips for avoiding mishaps?


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Fruit-picking ladder?

The conventional fruit picking ladder is a tri-pod but I prefer an adjustable step ladder of the Little Giant type. To me it's the most stable ladder for uneven ground and I'm on a ladder pruning fruit trees for about 7 months of the year.

You can order the cheapest Little Giant version which doesn't come with a life time guarantee but is much lighter than the least expensive model that does or save another 90 bucks or so and buy a knock-off. The knock-offs don't tend to be as well engineered.

AM Leanord sells a tri-pod made of wood for a metal one you can go to OESCO or somebody that serves the commercial fruit industry.


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RE: Fruit-picking ladder?

I thought about a my run of the mill step ladder about 5 years ago when my then oldest tree was about 6' tall and realized it would never do in the future. A good ladder is far less expensive than a trip to the ER and a wee-bit-o orthopedic surgery. Finally decided on a Tallman brand 8', aluminum tripod ladder, only went 8' because I planned to keep the trees short enough to work with that height ladder. Now that I've corrected the previous training errors (no scaffold bays) it works very well. All my ground is flat and level. One particular thing that is nice is the step depths, very comfortable on the feet. The Tallman ladder appears to be very well made, no wobble at all, no flex and decent gauge aluminum, time will tell over the years how it stands up to my weight plus the fruit filled picking baskets.

A down side, UPS can't handle it's size so shipping can be relatively expensive. Lucky for me, I was able to pick up mine at a growers expo only 2 hrs from here and saved the drop ship freight charge.

Like the weight too, very easy for me at 6', 180 lbs to handle.


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RE: Fruit-picking ladder?

  • Posted by murky z8f pnw Portlan (My Page) on
    Mon, Oct 17, 11 at 1:30

Here's a picture of a 14' aluminum tripod orchard ladder in front of my green gage plum tree. I also have an 8' one which is 10 times as easy to move around and position.

Here is a link that might be useful: Article praising the aluminum tripod orchard ladder


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RE: Fruit-picking ladder?

My first assistant pruner had over 10 years experience on a tripod ladder pruning in commercial orchards 4 months of the year. He's a pretty conservative guy but once he tried a Little Giant design he never went back to tri-pod.

Tri-pods have a couple of nice features because you can push the single supporting pod into the tree to help get close and the extremely wide base gives good stability, but I believe the LG advantages easily trump this. The adjustable height provides versatility as well as stability. A ladder too tall for the tree is inefficient and with a TP you're stuck with a single height.

With the LG design you can go up either side of the ladder which means that when you can place it sideways to the tree you can cover twice as much area before repositioning the ladder. It also can be stored more easily, and if you need to take it anywhere you can get a much taller ladder into a much smaller truck bed or car space.

With a TP if you make a mistake in how you balanced the ladder and start to fall you're done, but usually if you're careless with a LG you can swing your weight to stop from falling.

Both types of ladders are designed to be stable on uneven ground but neither are stable when the ground is uneven left to right. This is where you have to be careful.

I don't believe that anyone without experience on both types of ladders can really offer complete advice on which one is best.


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RE: Fruit-picking ladder?

h-man,
In recent years, I've seen some other folks, who'd long been proponents of the Tallman tripod-type ladders, coming over and endorsing the Little Giant. If they think it's better, I'm not inclined to argue with them.


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RE: Fruit-picking ladder?

You can buy the Little Giant at Costco, if you want cheap!

Carla in Sac


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RE: Fruit-picking ladder?

I'm not sure that Cosco has the type 1 which is the lightest and cheapest they make and unless you weigh over maybe 200 pounds, plenty strong enough.

I have 2 ladders from Little Giant and 3 knock-offs I got at home depot. The ones that we mostly use are the LG's.

Here's the one I'm talking about.

http://www.littlegiantladder.com/little-giant/type-1.html


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RE: Fruit-picking ladder?

I have used this type ladder in construction, and they are really versatile.

I don't quite understand how they can be stable on rough ground with 4 contact points....can someone explain what I am missing?


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RE: Fruit-picking ladder?

They're fine on sloping ground which is usually how the ground is in orchards I manage although occasionally a flat stone or piece of wood under one of the legs can be helpful, but for me, this is only needed about once a month during the pruning periods when I'm on my ladder almost every working hour.

My clients are all in hilly areas- but mostly this just means sloping ground without a lot of pits and uneveness in more than one direction. As long as three legs have contact to the ground it's stable enough anyway.


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RE: Fruit-picking ladder?

Sure, I can see that if the area was smoothish.

We are not so lucky, pretty lumpy.

I have found that on our variably hilly terrain that making the swing leg of the tripod ladder adjustable in height greatly improved it's stability and ease of setting.

I will borrow a buddies LG this spring and see how I like that. I can certainly see how it would allow more work at fewer position changes.


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RE: Fruit-picking ladder?

Always best to base it on your own preference. In the end, such judgements are never unanimous and someone with just as much experience as me might prefer the traditional tri-pod- especially if they are only using it on their own property.


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RE: Fruit-picking ladder?

  • Posted by mrclint z10SoCal Valley (My Page) on
    Wed, Oct 19, 11 at 15:24

"What sort of ladder do you use for picking?"

No ladders for me. None of my trees are allowed to get taller than I can reach standing on the ground. A tree that is large enough to require a ladder would be too hard to spray (if needed), prune, harvest or bird block. Besides dragging around a ladder is a huge pain, and falling from one would be a bigger pain.

Here is a link that might be useful: What Is Backyard Orchard Culture?


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RE: Fruit-picking ladder?

  • Posted by murky z8f pnw Portlan (My Page) on
    Wed, Oct 19, 11 at 18:58

mrclint,

The deer at my place agree with you.


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RE: Fruit-picking ladder?

  • Posted by mrclint z10SoCal Valley (My Page) on
    Thu, Oct 20, 11 at 18:18

Murky,

Why do you allow deer to run around your place and force you into a dangerous and hard to maintain orcharding situation? That tree behind the ladder looks to be 20' high and not on level ground. A bushel of fruit isn't worth it, as you may not survive a fall from that height. I wouldn't want to fall off of a step stool - let alone a tall ladder.

Here is a link that might be useful: Each year there are more than 164,000 emergency room-treated injuries in the U.S. relating to ladders


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RE: Fruit-picking ladder?

Yes, I do think Murky could consider some changes in training style. I don't think that ladderless orchards are practical for every situation but no need to ever let trees get over 14' or so. I don't like the look of that peach tree either. Without roping the thing the next crop may split it right down the center.

As far as all those ladder injuries, I do have to wonder how many are candidates for the Darwin awards. If you are attentive there is no reason to go up a ladder that isn't properly balanced.


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RE: Fruit-picking ladder?

Well, the discussion here has prompted me to use pickers from now on. I've used tripod ladders on orchards before and found them to be very stable on uneven ground and easy to set, so those would be my second choice. Little Giant and other heavy, four-legged types seem like a good choice where the ground is very firm and even.

I set and tested my stepladder firmly before climbing it, and was only four feet off the ground when it slipped. I was picking one second, and flying through the air the next, wondering why it was taking so long to reach the ground. It's because the ladder spun me through the air before throwing me to the side, so I landed on my chest. Fractured seven ribs, my shoulder blade in two places, and partially collapsed a lung. Of course the ladder must have slipped in just the wrong way, but it just takes once. I guess the point is that pretty or seemingly stable, if it's your unlucky day, isn't good enough. I'm just glad I didn't hit my head or break my back.


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RE: Fruit-picking ladder?

  • Posted by mrclint z10SoCal Valley (My Page) on
    Thu, Oct 20, 11 at 19:28

Going up and down on a ladder is different than working, reaching, pulling, using pruners, etc while balancing yourself on one. An orchard floor might not be a solid or level enough surface for safe ladder use. Please be careful, stuff happens folks.

Here is a link that might be useful: Man impaled with garden shears through eye socket recovers


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RE: Fruit-picking ladder?

  • Posted by mrclint z10SoCal Valley (My Page) on
    Thu, Oct 20, 11 at 21:11

Close call nygardener. Glad you are OK now. :)

If I had a large tree that required a ladder in order to harvest, I would either top work it with bark grafts or cut it down and start over. I've had tall trees in the past and I could never go back now.


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RE: Fruit-picking ladder?

NY Gardener, first you endorse the tri-pod and then explain why it is dangerous. Once it begins to tip it's all over. Think of a 3 legged stool compared to 4.

I have spent literally thousands of hours standing on a Little Giant ladder pruning fruit trees- usually on uneven ground. I've actually worn out 3 ladders now and am on my fourth. If the ladder is steady when you start up it will be steady when you reach the top- unless you are in mud.

The only time I've fallen was very close to the ground on a surface that was extremely uneven and I was careless to climb even though the ladder was unsteady. Thought so close to the ground- what could go wrong? Unfortunately even though I wasn't high up I fell right on one of the extended legs and did ache for a few weeks. That was a few years ago and not a mistake I'll repeat.

The only other close call I've had was when my LG was extended in straight position and the legs were standing on slick ice- more stupidity on my part.

So yes, accidents can happen on ladders and they can happen in cars or on the ball field. But you can minimize risk by being thoughtful and using the right equipment.

For many fruit growers there's good reason to have trees that require a ladder and you can't properly and efficiently prune with a pole saw.


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RE: Fruit-picking ladder?

  • Posted by olpea zone 6 KS (My Page) on
    Fri, Oct 21, 11 at 9:52

For my trees, I agree with Mr. Clint.

Early on I made the decision to keep a pedestrian orchard.

Pruning, training, and thinning was just too much work on a ladder.

Now I just prune anything I can't reach with my feet on the ground. I've used drastic measures like a chain saw to get taller trees down to a low height.

That said, there are reasons to have taller trees. Aesthetics and deer are common ones. Sometimes it can be extremely expensive (or impossible) to exclude deer. In other cases, large thoughtfully placed fruit trees may well add to the value of the property.


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RE: Fruit-picking ladder?

I know it is extra work and risk, but I like big trees. Perhaps it's because I spent so much of my youth climbing around in them, and want my children or more likely grandchildren to be able to have the same experience. I also find them to be beautiful.

Risk I can manage....someday I may pay a price for that, but a completely risk free life would be mighty limiting if even possible.

I don't let everything get big. Certainly for production short is easier.

But I have to be honest...if it doesn't get above 8' in my book it's a bush not a tree. Nothing wrong with bushes.


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RE: Fruit-picking ladder?

Many commercial orchards around here are on trees that require ladders. It is the most efficient way to grow apples without irrigation, I believe. A 12-14' apple tree is the best height for max productivity on free standing rootstocks. In a home orchard you certainly could grow them lower if you eliminated deer, coons, squirrels, etc. A tall trunk has it's advantages to stopping wildlife.


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RE: Fruit-picking ladder?

  • Posted by mrclint z10SoCal Valley (My Page) on
    Fri, Oct 21, 11 at 20:27

Here's a compact orchard - three or four trees in one hole - with what looks to be deer fencing around it:


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