Return to the Fruit & Orchards Forum | Post a Follow-Up

 o
Snow Apple?

Posted by flatlander2 (My Page) on
Fri, Oct 6, 06 at 21:42

Anyone ever hear of the snow apple? It's my dad's favorite from childhood, and he has one huge overgrown tree that never gets more than a few knobby apples each year. I was thinking of either trying to find a new one or pruning (reviving?) the one he has. Any advice would be welcome, or where I can order one of these. Thanks.


Follow-Up Postings:

 o
RE: Snow Apple?

*Snow Apple, France, 1730 Also called Fameuse, Snow apple is delicious for eating out-of-hand. One of the McIntoshs parents. Popular in the United States for more than 150 years. Deep crimson, tender, aromatic, juicy, sweet and tart, hardy and long-lived. Snow white flesh. Grows well in hot climates with warm winters, ripens in late Setember. One of the few apples to reproduce true from seed.

I don't know your geographic location, but there are several nurseries that sell the tree. On the west coast try www.treesofantiquity.com and back east www.bighorsecreekfarm.com

You can probably revive dad's tree by pruning. Cut off all the dead wood first, then this winter trim out crossed branches and let some light in the canopy. Do not try to do it all at once, about 1/3 at a time. The pruning will revitalize the tree and new shoots will grow out that will need to be trained.

You can always start another tree by ordering rootstocks from www.raintree.com and grafting a cutting from dad's tree onto it.

Applenut


 o
RE: Snow Apple?

I'm on the border of zones 4 and 5- northern IL. Do you think that it's more for warmer climates than mine? Also I posted another thread about the Sundance tree I bought- can this pollinate well with that one if I bought a new one, and be good for espalier? I also was thinking that a dwarf or semi dwarf would be more appropriate for the space...

Thanks so much for the input- I'm obviously a novice.


 o
RE: Snow Apple?

Snow would pollinate Sundance. Once you taste either one of them, you'll be looking around the yard for more space to plant more varieties.


 o
RE: Snow Apple?

Snow (Fameuse) should do just fine in your zone. I have one growing in northern zone 4 with no problems. Be aware that you may need to keep up an aggressive spray schedule with this apple since it is not one of the more disease resistant varieties.- Steve


 o
RE: Snow Apple?

Snow Apples are fantastic to eat. My folks had one on their farm here on the British Columbia Coast, zone 8. Good Luck


 o
RE: Snow Apple?

You might also consider topworking that tree over to more productive, less spray intensive cultivars. Each major or minor branch from the main trunk(s) could be worked over to another kind. You could have a dozen kinds of scab immune apples on that one tree alone.

Wait till you read thru the Garner book. It'll put all sorts of ideas in yer noggin! I've aleady done it to my fathers apples tree and a wild pear I found. Stumped both of them off with a chainsaw, inserted scions and stood back.


 o
RE: Snow Apple?

I am sorry to be bothering you with my question but could anyone of you please help me. I am trying to find out where I may buy a couple cases of "Snow Apples".
I don't even know if its the proper season to be asking this.
I thank you in advance with any help anyone has to offer.
Alex2007


 o
RE: Snow Apple?

IT'S THE BEST APPLE YOU'LL EVER EAT...I HAVE FOND CHILDHOOD MEMORIES OF THE SNOW APPLE, ALSO KNOWN AS "FAMEUSE". WHAT IS BETTER THAN A HUGE APPLE THAT CRISPLY SNAPS WHEN YOU BITE INTO IT, DRIPS JUICE DOWN YOUR CHIN, AND IS PURE WHITE INSIDE, BESIDES BEING A GREAT BAKING APPLE?
MY GREAT-UNCLES GREW THESE ON THEIR FARMS IN LOCKPORT, NEW YORK, PROBABLY ZONE 5A. I AM LOOKING TO BUY A FEW TREES MYSELF. I KNOW THERE IS A PLACE TO BUY THEM (I THINK IT IS IN ROCHESTER, NY) BUT I CAN'T FIND THE SITE. I DID FIND THEM AT "TREES OF ANTIQUITY", BUT WOULD PREFER TO BUY THEM LOCALLY, IN MY CLIMATE ZONE.


 o
RE: Snow Apple?

Paleface, PLEASE TURN OFF THE CAPS LOCK, IT READS LIKE YOU ARE SCREAMING AT US.

Cummins Nursery in Geneva, NY is an excellent source for this apple.

Scott


 o
RE: Snow Apple?

Alex2007, applesource.com lists Snow Apple under their variety descriptions for sale. I'm not sure if they would sell you a case, but you could buy several boxes of one variety. I've ordered heirloom apple boxes from them before, and enjoyed their products.

Here is a link that might be useful: Apple Source- Order One Variety


 o
RE: Snow Apple?

My parents had a tree that was called a 'Snow Apple', but the apples also had a small red streak through them. Pure white inside, with a small red streak. Is that the same as the ones you're talking about here? That was the best tasting apple I've ever had. It really spoiled me! The tree was half dead, but still the apples were wonderful.
thanks for any help.


 o
RE: Snow Apple?

I got this growing for about 3 years now and found it's not super
hardy for me in zone 3....keeps dying back.


 o
RE: Snow Apple?

I know this is an old posting, but I planted a Snow Apple last spring to serve as a polinator for my Honeycrisp (now that's the best tasting apple ever). Anyway, I'm anxious to taste the snow. The description was wonderful.

Oh, and I got mine from Miller's Nursery -- think it's in NY, but they ship.


 o
RE: Snow Apple?

I grew up on the remains of an old apple orchard in SE WI.
We had Jonathan, wolf river and numerous other heirloom apples. I recall our neighbor having apples and pears on their property. Their favorite was a snow apple!

Yes snow apples will grow just fine in Wisconsin. They were not a large apple but tasty to eat fresh.

I suppose having such an early experience with apples is why I am so possesed with growing them today. The seed of
inquiry was planted in my brain long ago for fruits.


 o
RE: Snow Apple?

I bought a bag of snow apples in the fall from our local orchard (Ortonville, MI). Nice, nothing to rave about. Not large, just a medium green-ish apple. Germinated some seed last Spring and planted outside in June. Good growing, aobut 3 ft. high now (dormant). True to seed so no grafting, will be good for my deer property.


 o
RE: Snow Apple?

Jhoss,
Snow apples are not true to seed. Actually, no apples are.
Not to discourage you as whatever grows will produce apples and will be good for the deer but it will not be a snow apple.

Also, many of the orchards I have visited in Michigan tend to pick this apple too early. They are much better when left on the tree longer.
Alber Orchards near Manchester leaves them on the tree until November.


 o
RE: Snow Apple?

Good to know, ribs. I will leave mine on longer. The info I have said they are a Sept. apple, but if they're better in Oct. or Nov. I'll wait. Thanks.

caryl


 o Post a Follow-Up

Please Note: Only registered members are able to post messages to this forum.

    If you are a member, please log in.

    If you aren't yet a member, join now!


Return to the Fruit & Orchards Forum

Information about Posting

  • You must be logged in to post a message. Once you are logged in, a posting window will appear at the bottom of the messages. If you are not a member, please register for an account.
  • Please review our Rules of Play before posting.
  • Posting is a two-step process. Once you have composed your message, you will be taken to the preview page. You will then have a chance to review your post, make changes and upload photos.
  • After posting your message, you may need to refresh the forum page in order to see it.
  • Before posting copyrighted material, please read about Copyright and Fair Use.
  • We have a strict no-advertising policy!
  • If you would like to practice posting or uploading photos, please visit our Test forum.
  • If you need assistance, please Contact Us and we will be happy to help.


Learn more about in-text links on this page here