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Heat-resistant Grapes

Posted by durai (My Page) on
Mon, Oct 25, 10 at 21:43

Hello,
Greetings.
I am from Malaysia. My country is hot and humid with
temperatures ranging from 80 F to 90 F. I will greatly
appreciate if anyone can share seeds of Grapes that you think will grow in my climate. I have Papaya, Guava,
Passion Fruit, Eggplant, Okra and Yard Long Bean seeds
to share.
Thank You.

Durai


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Heat-resistant Grapes

durai: I don't think you will find any grapes adapted to the hot humid tropics. You'll do much better with tropical and subtropical fruits.


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RE: Heat-resistant Grapes

Grapes don't do well in tropical climates....never heard of them growing there. Hot yes but Dry heat is what certain Vinifera quality grapes like. Grapes need 100 chill hours....tropics get 0 to my knowledge.


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RE: Heat-resistant Grapes

Thank you for your kind response. I appreciate it.
I have heard that they grow Grapes in Indonesia.
I wonder what type of Grapes grow there.


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RE: Heat-resistant Grapes

You can grow mango and Banana they are very well suited to your climate. Also you can grow dates I love dates and I used to live in climate like yours dates were great to grow. Grapes and Apricot need chill hours from 100 to 700 chill hours yearly ans don't survive in hot climate.


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RE: Heat-resistant Grapes

You should grow Jaboticaba if you want fruit similar in taste to grapes that performs well in a tropical climate.

Here is some more info on it
http://www.crfg.org/pubs/ff/jaboticaba.html


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RE: Heat-resistant Grapes

Thank you for your kindness. I have 6 types of Banana growing in my garden. I have Papaya, Coconut, Passion Fruit, Jack Fruit and some Vegetables. Yes, I will try
growing Dates and Jaboticaba.
A few days ago I saw a News Clip showing wine making in
Cambodia. They grow their own grapes.
Blessings.

Durai


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RE: Heat-resistant Grapes

Tropical Grapes are in production in many countries (India, Australia, Southeast Asia, South America, etc). Most often the areas where the grapes are grown have a cool dry season but not always. To find grapes that will handle your growing conditions you will need to find someone growing grapes in a climate as close to yours as possible - I would look to other Asian countries. Most of these businesses are growing grapes for wine making but there are some growing table grapes and some for raisins (dried grapes). All of them struggle with disease issues because of the high humidity.

I doubt any of the North American grape varieties would do well for you.

Google "Tropical Grape Production" and you'll find all sorts of articles written about grape production in the tropics - including Malaysia.

Good Luck!


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RE: Heat-resistant Grapes

I have family in the Caribbean island of Trinidad and many people from Syria and Lebanon grow grapes there mainly for their leaves. Grape bunches are produced after the vine is pruned, the vine never goes dormant. There's a dry season and a rainy season. There's no specific variety. It's how and when to prune it. I did notice that it's mostly the white mid eastern variety of grapes.

Bass


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RE: Heat-resistant Grapes

I would think that muscadines would grow there in Malaysia. Your climate is similar to Louisiana where I'm from. It actually gets hotter here (90-100+) and very humid weather coming from the Gulf of Mexico. Only thing is, it gets fairly cold in the winter months...sometimes around 20 degrees for maybe a day or two at a time. Mostly we have lows of 40. Muscadine grapes are grown here in my small orchard and just about everywhere else. Worth looking into.


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RE: Heat-resistant Grapes

Thank you Friends for your positive input.
I am not giving up. Yes, it is worth looking into.
I will continue to search and try. Is it possible
to grow Muscadine grapes from seeds please. Any idea
what types of Grapes are grown in the Carribean and
Middle East. I am not thinking about growing a vineyard.
I am passionate to have at least a vine
in my fence. Your suggestions are well appreciated.

Durai


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RE: Heat-resistant Grapes

I am planning to move to Belize this summer and am going to bring some Muscadine plants. I have not decided if I am going to bring young plants or seeds yet. Some people will tell you that you can't grow muscadine plants that will actually produce fruit from seeds, but I have done so, so I know it will work. The muscadine should do pretty well and I have been reading that you can force a dormancy period in them by removing the leaves and withholding water from them. I don't know how well I will do with them, but I am darned sure going to try. I am moving to a new world for me and I need some of the comforts of home when I get there. Good luck with the ones in Malaysia.


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RE: Heat-resistant Grapes

You can buy Muscadine and scuppernong grapes plants at this site: www.willisorchards.com

Just remember to buy and plant a male and female muscadines. As the person said from Louisiana. We get some cool days and nights but it is worth trying with two plants!

Muscadine and scuppernong grapes are native North American grapes indigenous to the lower half of the United States. They are much larger individual berries than bunch grapes, but grow in smaller pods or bunches and have a thicker skin. Researchers have discovered the seed of muscadines to have cancer preventing properties, so many commercial growers now make more money selling the seeds to pharmaceutical companies than they make on other juice or wine products. Muscadines are purple or black and scuppernongs are bronze or golden. However, a scuppernong is a muscadine. So, a golden colored muscadine is called a scuppernong. Muscadines are thought of as a traditional southern grape only, however, muscadines are zoned by the USDA for growing zones 6-10. Zone 6 includes a large area from Massachusetts to Kansas. So whether you live in the deep south or the northern United States, muscadines are a delicious, healthy, and easy grape to grow in your home vineyard. Just remember to plant male and female muscadines to ensure huge crops of scrumptious grapes.

Here is a link that might be useful: Willis Orchards in Georgia USA


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RE: Heat-resistant Grapes

Many of the newer muscadine "varieties" have both male and female parts and will fruit alone. Just read the descriptions carefully. Isons Nursery will have a larger selection.


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RE: Heat-resistant Grapes

i my self living in st vincent want to palant some grapes and some exptic plants,as i have a number of other plants want something different to grow and a challenge,advise


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RE: Heat-resistant Grapes

I am growing flame and thompson seedless grapes in the Phoenix area. Summer temps here get into the 100 - 115 range. It is a relatively dry heat, though. And it's true that the winters see temps down into the 40's. Just throwing that out there to muddy the issue a little.


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RE: Heat-resistant Grapes

I am growing two varieties which the seller named as
IAC and ISABELLA MADU. Both have grown to more than
8 feet. This is my first year in growing grapes and
I hope to harvest my first grapes next year. My climate
averages 90 F in the day time all year through.

Meanwhile, I have successfully germinated seeds from
Niagara, Thomson and Muscadine Grapes. I am keen to
experiment on these to see if they will do well in
my tropical climate. If you have seeds of any grapes
which you think can be grown in a hot climate, I will
gladly try growing them for you here.

Durai


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RE: Heat-resistant Grapes

Durai,

Thank you for your question and persistence! There is much good information here!

I would like to add my own questions. I live in the Caribbean (Zone 10) and plan on building a shaded patio (12' x 12'). I would like to use grape vines to provide the shade.

Does anyone have specific suggestions for the frame/wire/support to build for the grape vines?

Secondly any thoughts on my wish to combine grape varieties in the "roof"?


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RE: Heat-resistant Grapes

Tom - just remember that grape vines are heavy so your frame must be very strong. If you want a lot of grapes to eat you will need to easily get to the vines to keep them pruned (they grow fast). You will also want to easily reach the clusters of grapes - when they are ripe they attract a lot of wasps and hornets so give yourself a lot of room to move around (the insects are often 'drunk' on the juice of overripe fruit so they rarely sting.


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RE: Heat-resistant Grapes

Hi I am from Grenada (Caribbean), I have been growing grapes for a few years, I have also successfully gotten my grape vines to fruit however it isn't very sweet. I do not know what variety they are but they came from china and they fruit at any time after pruning, sometimes twice a year, i'll post pics soon


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RE: Heat-resistant Grapes

This may be useful to you:
http://www.vitis-vea.de/admin/volltext/e029444.pdf

I read some of it, and it says that for wet tropical lowland areas, the Muscat Hamburg is the most planted grape variety. Cardinal, Sultana, and Marroo Seedless also appear to do well.

I do not have any of these, but it should at least help point you in the right direction as far as what to look for.


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RE: Heat-resistant Grapes

There are plenty of grape varieties that will grow just fine down there...

In South Florida - near Miami - there were plenty of Muscadine grapes that did very well... The weather down there is extremely Swampy/hot/humid - and the insect/disease pressure is MASSIVE... but they didn't need any spraying... We often tried to grow "Northern" grapes and grapes that grew in Mediterranean climates like Italy and Spain, but they all died from the heat or the bugs/disease....

Personally, I would look into grapes grown in South Florida, Mexico, South America, and Southern China.

A big key is going to be finding grapes that grow in similar climates to yours.... You will need something that can withstand Humid, hot weather that brings fungus and rot, as well as lots of bugs....

Thanks


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RE: Heat-resistant Grapes

Thanks for this Great post, and all the useful input by many.
I also am from a tropical Humid Country (Trinidad, in the Caribbean).
As A Previous Member Commented , I also have seen Grapes Growing here (the Green Type)
It is Customary to see them in the Syrian and Lebanese descendants here.
I am also trying to grow Some here in my Garden.
From Perusing internet links I understand Grape can take a while to germinate from seeds
We Have a Tree Here that Grows mostly on the Eastern Sea costline Coast (places like Rampanalgas to Toco), it grows a "Berry Like" Fruit that Locals call "Sea Grapes" Here is s Pic of what it looks like
http://ist2-2.filesor.com/pimpandhost.com/3/5/1/8/35185/1/D/P/A/1DPA2/seagrapes.jpg

Here is a link that might be useful: Growing Grapes from seeds

This post was edited by AlTrini on Mon, Aug 26, 13 at 19:31


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