Return to the Garden Photo Gallery Forum | Post a Follow-Up

 o
Gladiolus closeups

Posted by springa7 z5 MA (My Page) on
Thu, Sep 8, 05 at 15:48

Here's a couple of "up close" photos of Gladiolus flowers. The corms for these plants can't survive a zone 5 winter in the ground, so we have to dig them up each fall, store them in the basement, and replant them in the spring. This year we didn't get around to replanting them until early summer, but they responded by sprouting quickly, especially in the rich sandy loam that we mixed for our new flower beds.

Here's a pink-flowered one with a visitor -

Here's a very close view of a white-flowered one -

Here's some pink flowers along with the long, straight, straplike leaves -


Follow-Up Postings:

 o
RE: Gladiolus closeups

  • Posted by klavier z4 Bing, z5 Pou (My Page) on
    Thu, Sep 8, 05 at 16:55

Have you tested if they can survive the winter? Most of my gladiolas are grown in zone 5 and come back every year. I have a couple in zone 4 Binghamton that also come back every year and spread.


 o
RE: Gladiolus closeups

Love how you captured the light playing on them, especially the whites. Very pretty.


 o
RE: Gladiolus closeups

klavier -

We've actually never tried to leave them in the ground over the winter. I think that the original label or information with them said they were only hardy to zone 6 or maybe even zone 7, so we simply assumed that we had to dig the corms up if they were going to survive. Thanks for the info though - I'll have to think about it.

This year they're probably going to come inside anyways, simply because we placed them rather haphazardly this year and will probably want to put them in different locations next year.


 o
RE: Gladiolus closeups

  • Posted by klavier z4 Bing, z5 Pou (My Page) on
    Fri, Sep 9, 05 at 10:10

The packages I bought all said zone 8 on them, butthey have always come back. I think the older varieties do better. I have some new ones that don't reproduce as quickly as others and over the years the pink ones have essentially disappeared. I have a bunch of yellow ones up against the house that come back every year, but have much smaller flowers and are more weedy. We used to have so many of them it was like an epidemic, they were everywhere. One year my mother decided they looked to weedy and dug them all up and left them in a pile in the woods. Before I could replant them half were dead. The next year a wood chuck came and decided he like the taste of the corm and destroyed half of the remaining half, some of which had six inch flowers and monster corms. And the winter before last had abnormally cold weather that was sustained for over two weeks killing half of the half of the half. So now we only have a few hundred plants, but tiny corms are showing up everywhere so in a couple of years they should be back to full glory.
Image Hosted by ImageShack.us
Image Hosted by ImageShack.us
Image Hosted by ImageShack.us


 o Post a Follow-Up

Please Note: Only registered members are able to post messages to this forum.

    If you are a member, please log in.

    If you aren't yet a member, join now!


Return to the Garden Photo Gallery Forum

Information about Posting

  • You must be logged in to post a message. Once you are logged in, a posting window will appear at the bottom of the messages. If you are not a member, please register for an account.
  • Posting is a two-step process. Once you have composed your message, you will be taken to the preview page. You will then have a chance to review your post, make changes and upload photos.
  • After posting your message, you may need to refresh the forum page in order to see it.
  • Before posting copyrighted material, please read about Copyright and Fair Use.
  • We have a strict no-advertising policy!
  • If you would like to practice posting or uploading photos, please visit our Test forum.
  • If you need assistance, please Contact Us and we will be happy to help.


Learn more about in-text links on this page here