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Noni & pain

Posted by gringojay (My Page) on
Fri, Jan 23, 09 at 9:54

Noni (Morinda citrifolia) fruit juice you probably heard of as a panacea.
Here is some practical 1st aid pain relief the ROOT of the Noni tree offers. The
preparation discussed is a standard alcohol extract of the fresh, clean root applied topically.
Personal experience includes these:
* Years ago I fell off a roof onto my back, out in the countryside. Acute, consistent severe pain & the inability to straighten spine upright was immediate.
Noni root tincture was applied directly to my back & posterior pelvic flesh. It allowed me to creep away to safety.
A week (+/-) later, feeling little pain, I resumed work pruning a tree. My spineless collapse in the branches showed that the muscular/skeletal/physical mechanical trauma had not yet been resolved. Point being, there was obvious pain control of this problem.
Next, these pain amelioration instances where I administered/used the root tincture may further interest some of you:
* accidental blows from steel pick head to the shins
* hammer strikes on the hand & head
* blunt force accidents to the arms & shoulders
* aching in the soft tissue structures of the throat
* abdominal pain of assorted origin
* chest discomfort
* on own knee bashed immobile in a traffic accident
Finally, I will review relief personally obtained from my own recurring/chronic pain. (Please note: I express no opinion regarding suitability for constant, unrelenting chronic pain.)
* on cervical spine region where my 40 year ago Ugandan rifle whipped neck pain syndrome occurs = quick relief & recovery for work
* on lumbar region when my 35 year ago rough & tough bush whacking lower back pain syndrome occurs = quick relief & recovery for work
Procedural use:
Shake tincture of Noni root, apply liberally to afflicted area (1st wipe/wash off dirt/sweat), let extract dry on skin before contact with clothing/bandage (I usually slather/paint on 2 coats of remedy at a treatment to assure coverage); when next treat area wash off old tincture.
Any build up in skin pores is NOT permanent; use common sense periodicaly giving skin a chance to "breathe" untreated. I used the extract 2-3X/day, every day, for 10+ days on my accident traumatized knee. (When I got to "civilization" without the tincture & relied on medicines their effectiveness was no better.)
(Comment: the wet tincture may stain fabric, dried residue contact with fabric seems to wash out - use discretion what root stain gets on to ; any skin tint from Noni root use is NOT permanent.)


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Noni & pain

When I was growing up we'd use the noni right off the bush. gotta get the stinky, fell on the ground, nearly over-ripe kind. then rub it on whatever was hurting. It stunk, but it worked!!!

Very good for internal issues too. Just google Noni for more info.


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RE: Noni & pain

Some of you may be able to grow Noni. See my 22nd Dec. 2008 post on Drought forum = "Need a challenge."
A few years ago, trying to develop a foreign aid agro-industrial export of Noni, I met with the biggest western industry wholesaler. Gotta say, I don't know what is being marketed as "pure" after hearing what they were importing.
The pungent fruit that falls off the tree is no longer green, but a translucent buff grey. This stage has top potency & may differ from commercial products' efficacy.
I mash it through a strainer & it has the consistency of rough apple sauce. It keeps in the fridge for just shy of indefinitely. 1 - 2 tablespoons at a time is a reasonable dose of this Noni compote.
To tweak the taste try mixing it with a little of what is called "Fortified Wine"
(low, low alcohol content) or some grape juice, if you can't abide to ingest it alone.
If you put the whole fruit in a blender & liquify it to sieve out the juice it tastes bad, because the oxygen interaction spreads the poor taste. Try the compote mash & you will see the taste is palatable.


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RE: Noni & pain

Sounds interesting.

If I lived in such a climate, I would definitely try it.

(It took GW awhile to find this, so...)


"Posted by gringojay (My Page) on Mon, Dec 22, 08 at 13:27
If any desert denizen needs a new challenge try growing Morinda citrifolia, the Noni tree. You'll want to bring it inside when very cold - it's a hearty tropical.
Look for seeds from Richter's in Canada or Horizon Herbs in Oregon.
They grow from seed in rock crevises and above high tide line in sand, so make sure drainage is exceptional. Their quick growth is rewarding and from the lateral roots new trees can sprout.
It adapts to full sun in a triangular shape, or convoluted snaking around as an under canopy. Cows can graze it down & it will regrow; prune it without any worry to keep it aesthetic.
The fruit is eaten as immuno-tonic, root extract is exceptional analgesic & leaves make tea. If the useage interests you I'll elaborate.
Worm farmers can feed their critters the abundant leaves & non-stop fruit."


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