Return to the Herbalism Forum | Post a Follow-Up

 o
Proper Diet

Posted by silversword 9A (My Page) on
Tue, Feb 3, 09 at 13:45

Eric mentions on the mercury post that "The vague symptoms that these regimens are supposed to fix can be addressed by proper diet, exercise and other lifestyle adjustments that don't rely on shaky placebo effect. "

What's a proper diet?


Follow-Up Postings:

 o
RE: Proper Diet

There are a number of healthy eating plans. Sample ideas here.

As mentioned elsewhere, one short and sweet recommendation comes from Michael Pollan (who has written essays and books dealing with nutritional issues):

"Eat less. Mostly plants."

The excerpted quote of mine from the thread on high-fructose corn syrup was in relation to unsupported claims for cleanses and purges that are supposed to remove "toxins" from the body (the alleged toxins either are nonexistent, are present in amounts far too small to have any toxic effect, are not removed by the suggested remedies, or on the miniscule chance any are removed, no positive health effects result).


 o
RE: Proper Diet

"Eat less. Mostly plants."

I agree. Probably the majority of people eat too much meat, sweets, and refined foods.

So IMO a healthy diet would contain lots of vegetables, unrefined grains, a little fruit, protein from vegetables, eggs, fish, and lean meats. IMO milk is not a necessary or desirable part of a healthy diet for adult humans. Organic active culture yogurt and unprocessed cheeses may be used.

One has to wonder about a food guide in which the USDA has input.


 o
RE: Proper Diet

You forgot the most important part of that Eric.

"Eat Food, Not too much, Mostly plants"

The eating food is the big part, not highly processed food like substances. Bake your own bread and cook with real ingredients like grains and vegtables and fruits.


 o
RE: Proper Diet

I agree, but advocate eating with the seasons, buying local produce & paying attention to your body. For example: Dry hair, skin, nails? You need oils! Isn't it amazing that nuts mature in the fall & last through the winter when we are at our driest? I was always told to eliminate the "whites"-- processed flour, sugar, white rice, milk-- & stick to the "browns"--whole wheats, honey, brown rice, etc., & to eat EVERY fruit or veggie with its skin on, which with imported produce might no longer be the best advice.... If the season's dark, eat dark greens. If it's light, eat light greens... Sounds very prosaic & simple-minded, but once you get into the rhythm of the season, it all makes a lot of sense. Hope this helps.


 o
RE: Proper Diet

Pollan is a huge advocate of eating with the seasons.

I am a Milk fan, but men tend to be bigger fans of milk, and I am a fan of butter, yum.

Also you don't eat EVERY fruit and vegetable with the skin on, Kiwano melons and Pineapples are good counter examples.

I also think the dark greens light greens issue is probably an oversimplification, although the heavier kales and the like tend to be darker and do better in the winter cabbage provides a counter example, holds till winter, not dark.

Eating in season is a good way to enable local food production to blossom, and increasing your animal food intake during the winter and plant food intake during the summer makes good sense. Having come from the far north I can attest to the ability of a bacon heavy diet to increase comfort with low temperatures, which lets you keep your house cooler, which can save more resources than go into producing the bacon in the first place. EniroWin!


 o
RE: Proper Diet

Hi Simple Mary,
I agree with eating the skins when possible. I rarely peel anything, much to the dismay of my family!

"eliminate the "whites"-- processed flour, sugar, white rice, milk-- & stick to the "browns"--whole wheats, honey, brown rice, etc"

I do this as well, and advocate eliminating as much processed food as possible. I think brown rice tastes better anyway :)


 o
RE: Proper Diet

Everybody who tries "Pera Pina" likes the drink.
It is easy to make on the stove top & keeps refrigerated exceptionally long, just getting thicker & better.
Boil the exterior pineapple skin (that's right, the peels with everything on it except the stem) with white rice (hey, try brown if you want) , sugar (OK, a sweetener of your choice) & cinnamon stick (you guys, feel free to spice away) until it is a soupy mush that can be strained through a colander.
You toss (sorry, vermicompost) the solids & bottle the liquid - best drunk cold


 o
RE: Proper Diet

Wow! that sounds really good! I'll try it next time I have a pineapple. What a good use of what I considered "waste".


 o
RE: Proper Diet

Just a note: Cabbage is a "cooling" food & very useful in the winter because it brings the heat of rheumatism & fevers down plus makes a great base for soup to support the system during recovery.


 o
RE: Proper Diet

that sounds like a very prescientific notion that is unlikely to be true.


 o
RE: Proper Diet

That makes sense Simplemary, since it is known to be anti-inflamatory and is an immune system stimulant. Thank you for the info.


 o Post a Follow-Up

Please Note: Only registered members are able to post messages to this forum.

    If you are a member, please log in.

    If you aren't yet a member, join now!


Return to the Herbalism Forum

Information about Posting

  • You must be logged in to post a message. Once you are logged in, a posting window will appear at the bottom of the messages. If you are not a member, please register for an account.
  • Posting is a two-step process. Once you have composed your message, you will be taken to the preview page. You will then have a chance to review your post, make changes and upload photos.
  • After posting your message, you may need to refresh the forum page in order to see it.
  • Before posting copyrighted material, please read about Copyright and Fair Use.
  • We have a strict no-advertising policy!
  • If you would like to practice posting or uploading photos, please visit our Test forum.
  • If you need assistance, please Contact Us and we will be happy to help.


Learn more about in-text links on this page here