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Tumeric and Alzheimer's

Posted by silversword 9A (My Page) on
Tue, Feb 10, 09 at 13:52

"A spicy ingredient of many curries may be an effective treatment for Alzheimer's disease, say researchers.

A team from the University of California at Los Angeles believes that turmeric may play a role in slowing down the progression of the neurodegenerative disease.

The finding may help to explain why rates of Alzheimer's are much lower among the elderly in India than in their Western peers.

Previous studies have found that Alzheimer's affects just 1% of people over the age of 65 living in some Indian villages."

Here is a link that might be useful: Spice


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Tumeric and Alzheimer's

Tumeric is not particularly spicy.


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RE: Tumeric and Alzheimer's

Curcumin (the key ingredient in turmeric) is currently being used in clinical trials to test whether it may be beneficial in a number of disorders.

More info here for those thinking about trying out a turmeric-heavy diet for disease treatment or prevention.

The BBC article raises the possibility that the reported lower incidence of Alzheimer's in some Indian villages
is due to their consumption of curcumin. Of course, there are many unknowns in the development of Alzheimer's, and genetic differences rather than diet may be crucial.


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RE: Tumeric and Alzheimer's

Turmeric grows easier for me than ginger. Propagate more from knuckle of root stock by letting piece sprout, like see garlic cloves do.
I grate the cleaned fresh root (it leaves a very stubborn oil on the rasp) & then freeze it as a hygenic pre-caution (my dogs roam).
A teaspoon of turmeric paste in most anything tastes OK, raw or cooked.
The anti-inflammatory effect on acute body pain is less than Noni root tincture's; turmeric's systemic circulatory action may more extensive.
Hopefully it's circulation into brain tissue is preventative of, of, of,um,um - oh yeah, "cognitive dysfunction."
Now there are limits to safe use :
*in bile duct obstruction it's gall bladder stimulation is contra-indicated
*when under chemotherapy there are some anti-cancer drugs whose utilization ratio gets decreased
*more common clinically is when anti-coagulants are being taken
& turmeric is considered a risk factor for exaggerating their effect


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RE: Tumeric and Alzheimer's

We have for many years used curry powder for flavor in egg salad and potato salad as we like the flavor. I also read a year or more ago about the possible benefits of turmeric so occasionally use it sprinkled on food. It doesn't have a lot of flavor but is useful for color/plate appeal. Since I'm not getting any younger and have seen the face of Alzheimer disease up close I'd prefer to avoid that particular disease. Haven't read about any adverse side effects pertinent to me so feel it's a safe product for me to use.


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RE: Tumeric and Alzheimer's

What zone are you in, Gringojay?

I realize ginger needs a warm climate, so I am assuming tumeric does as well....


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RE: Tumeric and Alzheimer's

"Tumeric is not particularly spicy."

Aw, shucks. And that was the most important part of this thread. Please, alert the BBC that they are incorrect. I'm sure they'd love to hear from you.


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RE: Tumeric and Alzheimer's

So you don't think that some poeple would avoid adding tumeric to their diets if they thought it was spicy? I know lots of people who refuse to eat spicy foods, and the volumes of tumeric used in curry are very high, making pills less practical.


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RE: Tumeric and Alzheimer's

Turmeric is not spicy, in fact is pretty bland in flavor. There are many spices in most prepared "curry powder" mixes such as pepper, chili, ginger, cloves which cause it to have degrees of spiciness depending on the proportions of those ingredients. I don't particularly like foods that try to remove my tongue so use a curry mix that is fairly mild and the turmeric "straight" which imparts almost no flavor.


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RE: Tumeric and Alzheimer's

Hi eibren,
Ginger is just too finicky for my semi-arid tropical climate.
You could grow turmeric OK in a good draining container if protect it indoors when cold.
Food market turmeric root's end "knuckle" will eventually sprout if kept in a basket/dish inside, out of sun, without watering it.


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RE: Tumeric and Alzheimer's

Brendan,
I was quoting the BBC. Evidently someone there thought it was spicy.

That's not the crux of the information though.


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RE: Tumeric and Alzheimer's

Silversword, I didn't say you were wrong, I said tumeric is not all that spicy. It doesn't matter who said it was spicy, what matters is that now people who read this post will know that that is not true. If I found a source that said that the earth is flat and quoted it while trying to make another point would that point then be immune from correction? If you really want I can contact the BBC too, but as I see it I am so well supported on both the validity and the value of that statement that this portion of the discussion should be over.


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RE: Tumeric and Alzheimer's

And I think it is.

Another dead thread.


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RE: Tumeric and Alzheimer's

My initial true statement did not kill it if it has died, it was the firefight that ensued from you complaining about me saying something true and relevant and not at all discouraging.

Was the I think it is comment you thinking that Tumeric is spicy? Or that this portion of the discussion should be over? Or that a source should be immune from correction?


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RE: Tumeric and Alzheimer's

As far as tumeric goes some that is spicy, some types are not. If you purchase dried tumeric and grind yourself your will probably have more spice. Like many things it depends on age of plant when processed, area of world processed from, method of processing, and last of all your own taste buds. There are different intensities depending on what you are using any herb or spice for. Think of the differences between peppers. Dried has a different taste and hotness than fresh. Some types are hotter fresh than dried but other are the reverse.

I don't want to get in as spitting match with you Brendan but you do need to get out and explore the world of tastes and scents. Is there a store in your area that has bulk spices/herbs. Try an Indian or Bengali store and see the different tumeric's, try a couple of types. You need to get out and explore more.

Taste and scent depend on the individual not your opinion of anything. You may suggest that in your experience something is one way but to blanketly state that all will experience something your way is every egocentric and damaging to your reputation and the use of your opinions as a source of information.

I hope you take this as inspiration to go exploring and not take all of you information from what someone has written.


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RE: Tumeric and Alzheimer's

You make some assumptions about me that are very wrong. While some Tumeric can be a little peppery its not particularly spicy. There are a plethora of tumeric Laden curry powders that are very spicy, however the Tumeric is not the source of that spiciness.

I routinely use tumeric as a colorant in mayo and flavoring in my chicken soup, I do not use a microwave for cooking and rarely eat out, I typically cook 4 meals a day, I really like to eat.


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RE: Tumeric and Alzheimer's

Silversword, I didn't say you were wrong, I said tumeric is not all that spicy. It doesn't matter who said it was spicy, what matters is that now people who read this post will know that that is not true.

If that isn't a contradiction...

I didn't say you were wrong... what matters is that people...will know that that is not true.

Spicy does not necessarily mean hot. It can mean piquant, pungent, heavily spiced... etc. To some people, it is a bit over the top. Obviously someone at BBC thought it was spicy. You don't. That doesn't mean you're right and they are wrong.

A "little peppery" to you may mean HOT to another person.

For someone so concerned with getting it accurate to the umpteenth degree this personal opinion being given as blanket truth is misleading. I find it a little more than irritating that this forum is constantly bogged down with your opinion that you and only you have the correct answers. Sometimes there is no correct answer. Is turmeric spicy? Depends on who is eating it. I think a more accurate statement would have been for you to say "I don't find turmeric particularly spicy".

What matters to me is that researchers are saying the compound in turmeric may prevent Alzheimer's. This is interesting to me. It could have led to a discussion on regional diets and their effects on the brain and body. It could have led to a discussion of favorite uses of turmeric. Instead it turned into another pi**ing contest. For me, it's boring. It's tiring. It's less than educational. And it isn't any fun.

I don't dislike you Brendan, I just have a hard time paying attention to anything you say because it comes across as so condescending.


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RE: Tumeric and Alzheimer's

When I worked in Philadelphia I used to get lunch fairly often from a street cart selling Chinese food. After awhile they knew my preferences for hot food. "You like spicy, right?".

Believe me, that food needed all the help it could get. I'm not sure the extra heat kept me from becoming demented, but my sinuses were always clear. Was there a brain connection? Would true Chinese hot mustard (unadulterated, of course) have an even more beneficial effect than turmeric? I plan to continue my researches this evening.


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RE: Tumeric and Alzheimer's

Eric, I don't think it's the heat of the turmeric but the curcumin that is the compound in the turmeric. I don't think curcumin is found in hot mustard.

Hot peppers are beneficial because of a substance called capsaicin which causes the heat of chiles and peppers.

It's thought to have many benefits, including: lowering blood pressure, reducing cholesterol and warding off strokes and heart attacks, speeding up metabolism, treating colds and fevers, preventing cancer and pain control.

But hot mustard does not contain capsaicin either. It's still good for you, it aids in circulation and liver and lung health. It also clears congested sinuses and can even help relieve constipation.


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