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Rose Hips

Posted by DebbyO z5bIN (My Page) on
Tue, Jul 27, 04 at 18:09

Can someone tell me what to do with the rose hips off of my rugosa rose bush? I get quite a few, and they get pretty big. I know they are edible, and have a high content of Vitamin C. How can I process them and/or consume them?

Thanks,

Deb


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Rose Hips

you can let them dry, hopefully, someone can give yu tips on that. yu can make rosehip jelly which is mild and sweet. or you can crush the rose hips and put in a teaball. pur hot water into the cup with the teaball and steep for 20-30 minutes.
i like to preserve hips for crafts.


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RE: Rose Hips

Rosehip Syrup: Add 1 cup rosehips to 1 1/2 cups water, cover and simmer for 15 minutes, then leave for 24 hours. Strain, boil and add 2 tablespoons lemon juice per 600ml liquid. Use 2 teaspoons daily to supply an adult with Vitamin C. Keep refrigerated.

Rosehip Jelly
1kg rosehips, washed and roughly chopped
1 litre water
450g sugar
3 tablespoons lemon juice, approximately

Put rosehips in a saucepan with the water and boil for about 1 hour or until soft. Pour into a colander which has been lined with muslin and leave to drain overnight. Next day, measure the liquid and add 2 cups sugar for every 600ml liquid. Heat slowly in a saucepan until the sugar has dissolved, then boil steadily until a little tested in cold water will set. Skim off surface scum, add lemon juice to taste, then pour into bottles. Seal when cool.

There are many recipes out there in Internet-land for using rose hips, if you do a search. They make a nice pie, for instance, and nice cookies, and an interesting soup.


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RE: Rose Hips

  • Posted by Andy_SA South Australia (My Page) on
    Wed, Jul 28, 04 at 18:50

Rosehip wine. If you're interested, email me and I'll send you the recipe.


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RE: Rose Hips

Do strain the liquid through a FINE cloth eg muslin. R. canina, especially, has little hairs that are not so tasty! I haven't checked in my rugosa hips, but I'd still take care with the straining part of the recipe.


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RE: Rose Hips

Hi all,
Can any rose hips be used to make rose hip syrup?
Thanks
Gill


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RE: Rose Hips

pretty much! here's some more recipes..
Roses are members of the apple family, and like their relative, they produce a fruit. This fruit, called the rose hip, is the big seed pods that forms on rose canes after it blossoms. Some roses, especially Rugosa roses, form rose hips that are as big as crab apples -- about the size of a quarter!

Rosehips, the Healer
Rosehips have been found within a body of an English woman buried almost 2000 years ago. Seems the English have been enjoying roses and rosehips since the being of recorded history. Read about the healing benefits of rosehips, and try Lucinda's Peachy Rosehip Muffin recipe.

Growing and Harvesting Rose Hips
Roses can do more than grace our landscapes and floral designs. Like its cousins the apple, pear, peach and cherry, the rose also produces a fruit. Valued are a valuable source of vitamin C, containing as much as 20 times more vitamin C than oranges. They are also an excellent antioxidant.

Rose Hips for Winter Fun
Like its cousin, the apple, a rose produces a fruit we call a "hip" or the ripened ovary. The hip is that portion of the rose in which the seeds of future generations are produced. And like the apple or most any fruit, the hip can be used in several ways by the successful gardener.

Rose Hip and Anise Liqueur

3 Tsp Anise Seed
1 Fifth 80-Proof Vodka
2 Tbsp Crushed Rose Hips
1 Cup Sugar Syrup

Directions:
Put the anise seed in a large jar with the vodka; shake well and let steep for one week. Strain through cheesecloth. Add the rose hips and steep for one month. Filter through cheesecloth and add the sugar syrup.
Sniffle Buster Tea
Delightful, aromatic, and medicinally correct, this tea is oh-so-useful in warding off the cold and flu blues.

You will need:
1 part fennel (fresh leaves, stalks, flowers, and seeds, or dried seeds)
1 part ginger root, freshly grated
1 part rose hips (organic)
1 part sage leaves
1 part thyme leaves
1/8 part orange slices (organic)

To make:
1. Combine all herbs in a pot, and cover with boiling water.
2. Stir well, cover, and steep 15 to 20 minutes.

from Herbal Teas by Kathleen Brown


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RE: Rose Hips

The best value in rosehips is the high concentration of vitamin C. Six rosehips contain the equivalent of 1 orange. Vitamin C is destroyed by heat and by dilution in water. To get the benifit of the nutrient, you need to eat the rosehip pulp without heating it or putting it in water just like you have to eat an orange immediately after peeling it.

I discovered an easy way of getting the vitamin C into me when I was hiking in the mountains in the winter. After the rosehips freeze, the pulp is easy to suck off without disturbing the itchy hairy seeds. Just pick the rosehips and keep them frozen. Whenever you need some vitamin C, take out a handful, let thaw out and immediately place in your mouth, holding onto the stem. Suck the pulp off. Do not under any circumstances bite into the hip. The hairy seeds will drive you crazy with itching.

Making condiments or tea from the rosehips would be a waste of the vitamin C and of my time.


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RE: Rose Hips

  • Posted by cacye Denver,CO (My Page) on
    Sat, Mar 18, 06 at 17:02

Before you make all these recipes, try your rose hips to see if they are yummy. There are definately bushes that taste too bland too bother with. The best ones usually are slightly wrinkly and no longer firm. Take the surface red off with your teeth. If you like the flavor, the rest of them on the bush will probably give you good results. My rose hip jam tasted a lot like apple butter.


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RE: Rose Hips

i wish i had wild rose hips to use for these great suggestions. but since i don't, i just take vitamin c pills that contain rose hips. they're easy to take and they taste good!

Here is a link that might be useful: Vitamin C with Rose Hips


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RE: Rose Hips

Can we eat the entire rose hip with the seeds still inside of them?

I keep finding online conflicting messages about if it is ok or not ok to eat the seeds.


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RE: Rose Hips

I'd ditch the seeds before eating the rose hips, especially after hearing about a species whose seeds have little hooklets that can get caught on the intestinal mucosa and cause severe problems.


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RE: Rose Hips

I found some wild rose hips today which I want to use. I want to make a tea out of them. Can someone please tell me can I just add them to boiled water for the tea or do I have to dry them first?

Also I read on here that the seeds inside are not edible? Does that mean I have to clean out the seeds before making into a tea?
I dont want to get sick. Please help. these are very small and it seems if I take out the seeds there wont be much left. What should I do?


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RE: Rose Hips

rosehips not only have seeds inside but little hairs kinda like the ones in artichokes that irritate the throat. straining your tea thru a cottonball removes even tiny hairs. once should do it but repeat if necessary. enjoy your rosehip tea!


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