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herb for fatigue?

Posted by milenka 6 (My Page) on
Thu, Nov 6, 08 at 12:55

hello

My husband is %90 of the time tired , even if we are in vacation doing absolutly nothing and sleeping good. There is an herb or something i can do? he alredy went to different doctors and they don't know even after many tests. Can some body help ?
I forgot to say that he is 35 years old , around 300 pounds , 6.3 tall and I cook as healthy as possible, and he is been like this since he was very yung. He is welder, plumer and pipe fither.


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: herb for fatigue?

Loosing weight will do far more for him than any herb. In general any thing that raises the energy level other than fixing a specific problem (this means major nutritional deficiencies, chronic infections, lack of sleep etc. not bad blood or negative spirit energies) is going to have some pretty significant side effects, Coffee and tea and Ephedra and any thing that has a pharmaceutical action is going to throw some other metabolic things out of balance and he will build up a resistance as his brain reqires its self to get around the problem. At 6'3" he should be no more than 225, yes he has a job the requires strength and he is a big guy, but that beer belly isn't helping him any. You may also want to try and figure out if what he has been breathing has been damaging him, some nasty fumes are involved in his job I would imagine.


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RE: herb for fatigue?

Chronic fatigue is also a common symptom of depression (something else to rule out).


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RE: herb for fatigue?

Fatigue is a common symptom in many illnesses and I've not seen that there is often a quick fix.

I don't know what you mean when you say you cook as healthy as possible so don't know what he is eating but I subscribe to the saying that "food should be our medicine". If he eats only organic vegetables, organic meat in small amounts, free-range eggs, and limits coffee, tea, and booze it might make a difference. Eliminating all white foods (sugar, flour, potatoes) and refined foods from the diet will be a good start. This seems to be a very difficult thing for many people as so many are addicted to sugar and colas but it's essential for health and gets easier over time.

I'd recommend consulting a naturopath because he may need treatment for parasites which is not a self-treatment.

All the best to you and your husband. He is young so his physical body should be able to heal fairly quickly if given the chance.


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RE: herb for fatigue?

It was probably inevitable that someone would bring up parasites. To judge from Internet forums, people blame nonexistent parasites for all sorts of ills and run themselves ragged purging and "cleansing" themselves of an illusion. Naturopaths are extremely unlikely to correctly diagnose such infections when they do exist. In this case, with what's described as an extensive medical workup that would've caught typical signs of parasites (such as anemia), the problem almost certainly lies elsewhere, and is not going to be solved long-term by herbs or any other supplements or pills.


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RE: herb for fatigue?

All of the above sound promising, especially the one about breathing fumes, particularly if he works on any of the old piping joined with lead--he could investigate the effects of other metal fumes by looking them up on Google by name and adding the word "toxicity".

Another possibility not mentioned is allergies, both to inhaled substances such as pollens and foods that he eats. Watch to see if he is more tired on high-pollen days for the first, or when he interacts with animals; If you use feather-filled pillows, down-filled quilts, or "feather beds," those can also cause allergic fatigue in many cases.

For foods, see if he is more tired after certain ones, such as milk, strawberries, tomatoes, peppers, and whole wheat. Milk intolerences are quite common. Suspect food allergies if his joints tend to ache within several hours after eating certain ones, or if his fatigue is more common then.

A fairly well-known naturopath has written several books about the "blood type diet," promoting his theory that people of different blood types have differing tolerances to various foods. There are also some genetic variations that make some people, for example, very damaged by fava beans (it does something to their blood), and phenylketinurics can become mentally retarded if they do not follow a special diet from birth. Some people cannot tolerate any form of gluten, which is found in many grains.

The physical demands of his job could also be a factor. Working in cramped quarters can lead to stiff muscles, which guarantee fatigue, since keeping them stiff can be tiring--they need help to loosen up, either by hot soaks, massage (which you could do), or gently stretching them briefly, possibly assisted by some such practice as Yoga or Tai Chi.

Sleep apnea is a popular diagnosis these days, but if he snores you might want to Google that topic, since snoring can be one symptom. There is also a condition called narcolepsy, in which a person has an irresistable desire to fall asleep (and sometimes does) numerous times during the day. There are medications for that.

People vary in the amount of sleep they need, as well. If you only need seven hours a day and he really could use ten, he could be forcing himself to match your schedule. Sleep deprivation is also a problem where a person is working two jobs or a lot of overtime to make ends meet. Sleep deprivation can eventually be quite damaging, both physically and mentally.

Since this is an herbal forum, I would like to point out that coffee, tea, and cocoa are all herbs which, because of the varying forms of caffeine they contain, do assist one to stay awake. Caffeine is also good for mild bronchitis. If used intelligently, they are probably not that much more harmful than many other herbs; it is not their fault they have tended to be overused. Additionally, tobacco is also an herb, which assists the mind to focus, and is probably not that harmful if used infrequently. Tobacco is probably the most addictive of those mentioned, but coffee, at least, is as well. If he gave up any of these recently, he would tend to feel more tired for awhile. Also, anyone having difficulty getting to sleep at night should avoid all of these from lunchtime on, as well as any caffeinated carbonated beverages, such as coke, or even, in some cases, such things as coffee ice cream or chocolate-flavored candies and desserts.


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RE: herb for fatigue?

Thank you so much to all of you. We don't drink alcohol , coffe or te but.... we love italian food and all kinds of white foods wich I knok doesen't help with a good nutrition and even that I try to cook healthy well we are very weak on that which I am going to fix. I am going to pay attention to possible food alergies to . And of course we have to do more exercise.
Thanks again to all


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RE: herb for fatigue?

Some good advice has already been given, but constant fatigue is a serious condition that needs proper investigation before it can be successfully treated.

Sleep apnoea is one primary cause of fatigue, and goes along with a host of other problems, of which obesity is just one. I think it's definitely worth an investigation into his sleep patterns. It may save his life - he could well be having nano-sleeps while he's driving!

As has already been mentioned, fatigue can be a symptom of a whole range of health problems - since he's overweight, he could well have developed Type 2 diabetes, for instance, and fatigue is a symptom of that.

Once you know the bottom-line cause of the fatigue, THEN you have a better chance of treating it successfully.


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RE: herb for fatigue?

Definitely check out sleep apnea. With his weight, it's by far the most likely cause (and can cause serious problems with blood pressure, cardiac events and strokes, if not treated properly).


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