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what to do with yucca?

Posted by Mariabee 6KY (My Page) on
Thu, Nov 6, 03 at 17:16

I just removed a large yucca from my yard, and am left with a large fleshy root and stem. Any ideas on what I can do with it?


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RE: what to do with yucca?

Root can be used as a poultice for bone breakages and sprains, and for rheumatism. A tea made from the root is used internally to treat arthritis, gout, prostatitis, rheumatism and urethritis. The fresh, undried flowers have shown some anti-tumour activity. The tea can be used to treat dandruff and hair loss when applied topically. Has been used to treat Addison?s Disease, osteoporosis and some kidney diseases. Yucca is rich in Vitamin A, B-complex, and contains some Vitamin C. It is also high in calcium, potassium, phosphorus, iron, manganese and copper. Contains precursors to cortisone, and improves the body?s ability to manufacture its own cortisone.

Usual Dosage: Pour 1 cup boiling water over 1-2 teaspoons dried leaves, steep for 10 minutes, strain. Take 1/4 cup up to 3 times per day. Or take 1470mg of standardised supplement up to 3 times per day.

Other Uses: The root can be used for soap, suitable for bathing or laundry. An extract of the root is often included in commercial shampoos. A spiny leaf tip, with fibres attached, can be used as needle and thread. Leaves can be beaten to extract the fibres which are used to make a strong rope, or baskets and mats.


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RE: what to do with yucca?

I dunno about the soap thing Daisy...I make soap...I have heard about that, but it might be an old wives tale or lost in history....I am not sure, there was some discussion about it in one of my soaping groups.
I have heard that Yucca root is great eatin'! :o)


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RE: what to do with yucca?

Oh, the yucca soap thing is no wives' tale. I've used it myself. All you do is swish some of the clean root around in some water, and the water gets quite frothy (not as frothy as with normal soap, though - you won't get a bubble-bath!). I grate the root first and put it into some pantyhose for the purpose. Use the 'soapy' water as the shampoo or laundry detergent or whatever. No need to add anything else or to rinse. (Much the same as soapwort leaves.) Very gentle on the skin and really makes the hair shine, and good for washing delicate items.


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RE: what to do with yucca?

  • Posted by Rosa 4 CO (My Page) on
    Fri, Nov 7, 03 at 18:58

Have to agree about the soap thing. Used it myself and daisyduckworth is 100% correct-my technique and experiences the same. Really makes hair shine!!
Have also mended jeans with the leaf tip-it works well and is strong. Also, I personally wouldn't eat the root, but the very young buds are very good and not at all "soapy" (they are to me when they get older). But wear sturdy gloves and watch your arms when reaching into the center of the plant to get the buds-ouch!!!


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RE: what to do with yucca?

okay......well, I started growing soapwort to try the same thing, though Yucca would probably be a better choice for a plant where I live...Daisy, have you used soapwort?
xoxoRobyn


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RE: what to do with yucca?

Yes, but I've never got enough of it to make it a regular thing - I keep it in a pot, because I don't have the space for it in the garden - it can take over! Excellent for the hair, and for cleaning tapestry. Also excellent as a wash for skin problems like psoriasis or eczema. Just swish the leaves around in water.


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RE: what to do with yucca?

Just saw the Werner Herzog movie last week in which he encounters the Loch Ness monster. It starts out with him preparing some yucca root as part of a meal for his friends. It ends up not being eaten at all because it wasn't done right. From what he says, it has to be prepared a certain way or else it contains a poison. I didn't catch on what the poison is. Does anyone know?


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RE: what to do with yucca?

  • Posted by Rosa 4-ish (My Page) on
    Thu, Nov 4, 04 at 7:44

Yucca root contains oxalic acid. It's what cuts the dirt and makes you hair shine.


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RE: what to do with yucca?

Is this the same as cassava? If so, then it is commonly used in soups in Latin America. Simply peel it and cut it into chunks and cook until tender. Great in chicken soup. You can also fry yuca like you would potato chips. A favorite way to make fried yuca is in sticks. Boil large 3-4" chunks of yuca until just tender. Cut into 1" wide by 3-4" long sticks, then deep fry. Yummm!


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RE: what to do with yucca?

I heard there is a difference between yuca and yucca. Is there?

How can I tell which one I now have taking up a large amount of counter space in my kitchen? It's a large tuber that is med/dark brown and waxy on the surface. I haven't cut or sniffed it yet. Wanted to try and make some gentle soaps and shampoo but I'd like to know if there are any warnings to be had about these supposed differences before I die in my kitchen. When my experiments to bad- they go BAAAAAD!

~Maraluch


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RE: what to do with yucca?

There is a difference between Yuca and Yucca. Check out this site www.specialtyproduce.com/produce/Yuca_Root_2008.php, it has a great description, I have one growing in my yard (yucca)and was planning to make a soap which is used for cleansing in certain shamanic practices, best to be sure before you try new things, let me know how it goes, hope u don't die in your kitchen, best of luck, Eldritch


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