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Peace Lily for indoor planting

Posted by Alshain 8 (My Page) on
Fri, Feb 24, 12 at 18:33

I have a peace lily that was sent to a funeral a year ago. When I got it, it was in the typical 9" black plastic pot with holes in the bottom that plants are purchased it. This pot was set in a wicker basket with a plastic bag liner, which was torn so I added a small plastic bowl liner below the black pot.

I was careful not to over water it and misted the leaves. I keep it in my office (due to cats at home) which has a wide window (~8' x 2') but I keep it off to the side with the blinds partially open. It grew well this way for a while and even flowered twice.

Now the leaves are turning yellow and black, but it is creating new ones. It is root bound, though I read this plant likes that. Never the less, I think it needs re potting, if anything to help drainage. I know just enough to be dangerous about plants.. or at least terrestrial ones, my freshwater aquarium is a sight to behold.

So, here is the problem. I need to re-pot this thing.
I'm thinking 12"? or is that too big?

I can't let it completely drain because it's on a small wire stand in my office with no where for the water to go. I do have some extra aquarium gravel though. I've been told I could put this go under the soil for drainage?

Also with plants in my offices, we have had troubles with fungus gnats. If it attracts gnats, I'm going to be forced by my coworkers to take it home, which because of the cats means garbage can. The soil it came in has never attracted them. So I'm reading on the web no peat? What would be a good soil composition?

Any other thoughts?

Thanks for any help!


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Peace Lily for indoor planting

  • Posted by tapla z5b-6a mid-MI (My Page) on
    Fri, Feb 24, 12 at 19:39

There are many cultural issues that could cause the yellowing leaves. Chief among them are over-watering or an overly water-retentive soil, a high level of salts in the soil - which often occurs as a result of watering in small sips and not flushing the soil when you water, and being root bound. No plant 'likes' to be root bound under any circumstances btw, because it stresses the plant. WE may at times use the stress of tight roots to achieve an end that pleases us, but it doesn't please the plant.

Tight roots can in some plants increase the number of blooms, but that occurs as a result of the plant recognizing it is in trouble, which increases its biological focus from normal daily activities to putting extra energy toward passing on its genes - flowers and eventually fruit. That it pleases us is not an indication it pleases the plant. If Mother Nature wanted her plants root bound, she would have arranged for roots to grow in tight little geometric shapes directly under the stem.

I would suggest you divide and repot into a suitable soil, and devise a strategy that finds you regularly flushing the soil if you can't each time you water.

I don't think you necessarily need to go completely without peat in your soils, as long as they are well-aerated and don't stay soggy for extended periods.

I'll link you to a thread that has a lot of information about soils and soil/water relationships. You can decide if you think it's helpful and go from there. I grow all my houseplants in a 'no peat' soil that looks like this, and I've never had any problem with gnats.

Photobucket

Al

Here is a link that might be useful: Lots more about soils


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RE: Peace Lily for indoor planting

Wow. That is an incredible amount of good information. I would love to try that.

Now just to find the stuff. Not sure about the Turface, but there is a Carquest in the neighboring city. I'm sure I can get the pine at Lowes or Home Depot. The stone might be the hard one to find, but I am in TX so there are plenty of feed stores around.

Well my weekend is set :)


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RE: Peace Lily for indoor planting

  • Posted by tapla z5b-6a mid-MI (My Page) on
    Sat, Feb 25, 12 at 16:16

Thanks for the kind words - so happy you found it worthwhile!

Let me give you a little heads-up. There are actually 2 soils in that thread, only one of which has Turface in it. I currently grow all my houseplants in the one that is based on the 1:1:1 ratio of screened pine bark:screened Turface:crushed granite, but if I was presently growing PLs, I would be growing them in the 5:1:1 mix, pine bark fines:peat:perlite. The reason is, they are so vigorous that they would be outgrowing the container before soil collapse of the 5:1:1 mix would ever be an issue. It doesn't make the best sense from the perspective of effort expended or expense, to use the gritty mix for this plant, even though it would be slightly better from the plant's perspective. I just think this plant is too easy in the 5:1:1 mix to warrant using the gritty mix.

That said, I think you'll find it extremely beneficial for the rest of your plants if you'd like to adopt a more leisurely pace and put the ingredients together for the gritty mix. Turface is usually easy in TX. I don't know about the crushed granite - feed stores are the best place - make sure you don't end up with crushed shellfish. The bark is where you find it. Occasionally you can find it at big box stores, but not always. There are whole threads on the container forum dedicated to helping others find what they need for their soils, so take advantage of that assistance if your enthusiasm doesn't wane. ;-)

I'd rather see you patient and gaining a good sense of the concept before you rush headlong into things and start substituting something that doesn't allow you to get the biggest bang for your efforts. The concept is much more valuable than the recipes, which are simply the best ways I have found to implement the concept. I have a lot of experience helping people in both the community and in forum settings, and my experience clearly shows that gaining an understanding of how water behaves in soils and its effect on your plants is the biggest step forward a container gardener can make at any one time. I get my kicks from knowing the light has gone on for you, so if you have any questions, please don't be reluctant to voice them.

Including your zone and a large city near you in your user info would be very helpful (like my tapla z5b-6a mid-MI), to those wanting to help you find what you need, especially on the container forum.

Al


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RE: Peace Lily for indoor planting

Yeah, I was thinking the 5-1-1 after reading tecnico's thread in the container gardening forum. I'm just really concerned about attracting those darn gnats back again.

As for the zone, I'm not sure how to figure out what mine is. I'm in Tyler, TX which is much more humid and lush than you would expect when you hear "Texas". It's actually closer to Arkansas climate but a little warmer.


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RE: Peace Lily for indoor planting

  • Posted by tapla z5b-6a mid-MI (My Page) on
    Sun, Feb 26, 12 at 17:36

F gnats are attracted to wet matter that breaks down quickly. Some soils have a lot of ingredients that aren't all that stable, like 'forest products', which could be anything from ground up pallets to duff from the forest floor. Pine bark is very stable, and the top inch or two dries quickly, making it an inhospitable home for gnats.

Here is a new USDA map you can use to determine your zone, just by entering your zip code. .... hope it's helpful.

Al

Here is a link that might be useful: New USDA zone map for 2012


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RE: Peace Lily for indoor planting

OK, I'm definitely going to go with the 5-1-1 then. Been studying Tecnico's post in container gardening.

Question about pots, I don't have any so I will have to buy but since I can't have drainage holes, I was wondering how useful are the pots that water by the capillary action? I've seen them at Wal-Mart, they have a spot to water in the tray on the bottom. Do they work better than watering from the top or does it really make a difference?


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RE: Peace Lily for indoor planting

  • Posted by tapla z5b-6a mid-MI (My Page) on
    Mon, Feb 27, 12 at 16:50

When using self-watering pots, unless you make an effort to flush the soil regularly (from the top), this type of container ensures that all the dissolved solids from tap water and fertilizer solutions that make it into the soil and go unused by the plant, stay in the soil; so please keep that in mind if you decide to go that route.

You mentioned that you can't have drain holes. Can I be nosey enough to ask why?

Al


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RE: Peace Lily for indoor planting

Well, I meant I can't have completely open drain holes. I can have drain holes if it drains into something below. I was planning to get the pots with the built in tray on the bottom, regardless of the whether it had the self watering pour spouts or not.

But the goal is to be indoors in my office, so it can't just drain all the time or it would get all over the carpet.


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RE: Peace Lily for indoor plantings

So either this...
http://www.walmart.com/ip/Mainstays-15-Basic-Planter/16794645

Or this...
http://www.walmart.com/ip/Mainstays-5.2-Self-Watering-Planter/16630836

Only in a 7" size. Unless those create problems?


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RE: Peace Lily for indoor planting

  • Posted by tapla z5b-6a mid-MI (My Page) on
    Mon, Feb 27, 12 at 19:47

Informational only - not trying to change your mind:

The problem with planters with attached saucers is the same as that with self watering planters, as mentioned above. I know you need/want it to look good, so you decide. The best arrangement is a collection saucer with something in it that raises your planter above the water that exits the pot, but it's difficult to make that arrangement attractive, unless you're more creative than I, which really isn't all that difficult.

It's also unlikely that the 5:1:1 mix would work with bottom watering because of its large poor space. The only soils that wick well are those that are very water-retentive, which is what you're trying to avoid. They have to be to 'pull' water up several inches to a foot or more (in SWCs) from the reservoir, and well-aerated soils can't do that.

I don't want to discourage you or try to lead you. I'll help any way I can if you think there's anything more you need in the way of info. ;-)

Al


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RE: Peace Lily for indoor planting

Hmm, more creative...

I'm thinking a saucer like this and a pot which would be similar in design to this. The saucer would be slightly larger than you would expect for the pot in order to show off the bed of river stones on which the pot would sit.


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RE: Peace Lily for indoor plantings

Actually, even better. I already have one of these If I got a big enough saucer, the wire stand could sit in the saucer and then surround the base of stand with the river stones and any drainage water would then fall through the stand to the stones where it would evaporate and create humidity for the leaves of the Peace Lily, which they enjoy already.


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RE: Peace Lily for indoor planting

  • Posted by tapla z5b-6a mid-MI (My Page) on
    Mon, Feb 27, 12 at 20:58

Looks like all you needed was a little challenge! Photobucket

Al


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RE: Peace Lily for indoor planting

Ok, I just got home from the Lowes. I found the following:

Miracle Grow Sphagnum Peat
Miracle Grow Perlite
Pine Bark Mulch (1 inch or less, from the torn bags it looks partially composted)
Pulverized GardenLime
5 gallon bucket

The only thing I'm not sure about is the fertilizer. I looked for the Dynagro you recommended but I couldn't find it and don't know enough about the fertilizer to substitute. I can try home depot tomorrow.


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RE: Peace Lily for indoor planting

  • Posted by tapla z5b-6a mid-MI (My Page) on
    Tue, Feb 28, 12 at 20:10

How about a picture of the bark with something common in the picture as a size reference point?

Al


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RE: Peace Lily for indoor planting

Not the best pictures, but I sure hope this works cause it's a mighty big bag and I won't know what to do with it if it doesn't now that it's open.

Photobucket

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RE: Peace Lily for indoor planting

Will that soil work? It's hard to tell from the picture It's actually a mix of sizes up to ~1" so I could screen it if I needed to. It has some really fine compost mixed in.


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RE: Peace Lily for indoor planting

  • Posted by tapla z5b-6a mid-MI (My Page) on
    Thu, Mar 1, 12 at 13:58

I think there is such a high % of chunky material that it's not going to work well at all. ;-( For the 5:1:1 mix, you would want the bulk of the bark to be in the 1/16-3/8 size range. You want something that looks like the bark at 3, 6, and 9 for the 5:1:1 mix (@ 3 is a little too large, actually). What's at the top is prescreened 1/8-1/4 that I use for the gritty mix.

Photobucket

I feel bad that you bought a bag that won't work. If you'd like, I'll send you some bark so you can make a small batch of either the gritty mix or the 5:1:1 mix? Let me know.


Al


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RE: Peace Lily for indoor planting

Ah darn. Don't worry about the bag, it was $4 for that huge bag. I've wasted more on pet projects than that. My only problem is what to do with it LOL. It's big, heavy and my balcony is only 3' by 8'. :)

It might be helpful to have a small sample so I would at least know what to look for. But before we go to that trouble, let me look at some of the smaller garden centers and see what I can find.

I live in Tyler, the worlds largest producer of Roses. Surely someone here has this stuff.


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RE: Peace Lily for indoor planting

I may have a source. They said it was 'Double Ground'. Not sure what that means, but I'm gonna go by after work and take a look.


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RE: Peace Lily for indoor planting

Well, no luck. They were a landscaping place and their stuff was about 1/2" Number 3 in your image (I think). I found a place that seemed to specialize in potted plants on the way, but they were all out the pine and I didn't see fir.

Though I did see the Hapi-gro landscaping mix someone else mentioned in your soil thread but like they said, the bag says Hardwood.

So, 3/8". That's half the size of a dime right?


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RE: Peace Lily for indoor plantings

Ok, I found my point & shoot camera, instead of the old iphone 3G. This is the same stuff I bought but I moved it around a bit. Can't I screen out the big stuff to get close the size you suggest?

Photobucket


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RE: Peace Lily for indoor planting

  • Posted by tapla z5b-6a mid-MI (My Page) on
    Thu, Mar 1, 12 at 19:30

Sure - if you want to. When you least expect it, you'll run up on just exactly what you need ..... happens to me all the time.

If you can get dime-size & smaller, you're good.

Al


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RE: Peace Lily for indoor planting

OK, I know you haven't had time to answer but I went out on a limb and bought some 1/4" hardware cloth. This is the same stuff I bought, screened. Does that look ok?

Photobucket


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RE: Peace Lily for indoor planting

By the way, I can make a second pass on the screen to get some of the bigger stuff that made it through out.


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RE: Peace Lily for indoor planting

  • Posted by tapla z5b-6a mid-MI (My Page) on
    Fri, Mar 2, 12 at 7:42

Looks ok - 3/8 or 1/2" hdwe cloth would be better. I'd use maybe 1/2 part peat and 1-1/2 - 2 parts coarse perlite (if you can find coarse - if not, don't fret) with what you have there.

That bark also has a lot of sapwood in it. Keep your eyes peeled for something a little more suitable. I'm always able to find bark I don't even need to screen, so it's out there.

Photobucket

Al


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RE: Peace Lily for indoor planting

Ok, I will definitely keep a lookout. There are other nurseries to check, but I really feel like I need to get this sad little plant in better condition before there is none left to replant so I am going to go with this for now.

I'm going to separate it this time, but eventually I'll want a bigger plant and at the rate this thing grows, I'm probably going to end up re-potting it again not too far out anyway.

Also, I might try my hand at the balcony window boxes again this year. Though with the pine tree shade I have, I haven't had success with anything but Periwinkles. But I definitely want to make use of this new soil knowledge :)

Thanks for the help, I will keep you posted.


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RE: Peace Lily for indoor planting

  • Posted by tapla z5b-6a mid-MI (My Page) on
    Fri, Mar 2, 12 at 14:20

Please do. I'm sure we're all interested in how you fare.

Al


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RE: Peace Lily for indoor planting

Ok, based on the 5:2:1/2 recommendation (rounded slightly).

3 Gallons Pine Bark
19 Cups Perlite
5 Cups Sphagnum Peat

Just gotta add the lime.

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RE: Peace Lily for indoor planting

  • Posted by tapla z5b-6a mid-MI (My Page) on
    Fri, Mar 2, 12 at 21:33

You know how to make things happen, and should be well pleased!
Photobucket
It's a little fine looking, so I would stick a wick in the soil - at least until the roots have colonized the soil mass well. I'm excited for you - can't wait to see how well you do!

Best luck!

Al


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RE: Peace Lily for indoor planting

Well the operation was a success, mostly.

5 Young plants are in the recovery ward. (All had strong root structures and got replanted).

2 Plants with decent root structure but only 1 leaf are on the transplant list (There were more divisions than expected, need more pots & soil, currently sitting in a cup of luke-warm water to prevent drying).

1 Plant is in critical care. (This one had only a few hair sized roots off the base of the plant. It's going to be the hydroponic experiment like tecnico did. See if we can't get it to grow out before planting.)

Overall I think it went well.


  • It was a good learning experience for me.

  • The plant was not as far gone as I feared.

  • There was root rot, but not as bad as I thought.

  • I largely underestimated the size of the root structure. I fear the new pots are still too small despite the division, but once I had it out I didn't want to delay replanting.

  • I also underestimated how fast that soil would disappear and how many divisions there were going to be.

  • The planted ones are on the balcony. My balcony is east facing and has a waist high solid "wall" with a 1ft banister on top and light pine/sweet gum tree shade. They are pushed up against the wall so the sun won't get on any more than the tips of the leaves. Though the glass window door behind it may reflect quite a bit.

  • 7 day forecast indicates a few lows of 45 deg F (High of 75)

  • I can bring them in if necessary, I just have to lock the cats out of the bedroom. Though now that I know it's not even related to Lilium, I'm not entirely certain it's even poisonous to them. Better safe than sorry though.

  • I will get pictures up as soon as I can.


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    RE: Photos

    Public Photobucket Album

    Soil Experiment


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    RE: Peace Lily for indoor planting

    Found this at Wal-mart of all places. Didn't have any coins on me at the time :(

    Uploaded from the Photobucket iPhone App

    Uploaded from the Photobucket iPhone App


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    RE: Peace Lily for indoor planting

    • Posted by tapla z5b-6a mid-MI (My Page) on
      Sat, Mar 3, 12 at 21:13

    You'll prolly tend to want to fuss over them, but be careful not to over-water. "Damp, not wet" Try to protect them from temps much below 60*, and be careful not to let them get below 55* if at all possible. Everything looks pretty good! If you have a plant that tends to wilt, don't be bashful about cutting the leaves of that plant in half across the veins to reduce the volume of foliage the roots need to support.

    Great job! The girl's got some tools!

    Al


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    RE: Peace Lily for indoor planting

    Thanks for all your help Al. I really appreciate it, plus I'm having lot of fun.

    I'll have to bring them in tonight in fact. Looks like just below 40 tonight, already 57... about to go do it now. I pre-moistened the soil like you told tecnico, so I don't imagine I will have to water them for a while.

    What did you think of that last soil pic. Does that look closer or still too big?

    BTW, I'm actually a guy. The name kinda sounds girlish, I've gotten that before. It comes from some of my other hobbies. I once worked as an assistant for a zoologist that specialized in the recovery of injured and orphaned birds of prey. I also enjoy astronomy... so my online handle is actually the same as the name of a star in the Aquila (Eagle) constellation. I used to use Altair, which is the Alpha star, but a game recently came out called Assasin's Creed and the lead character is almost the same so I switched to the Beta star.


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    RE: Peace Lily for indoor planting

    • Posted by tapla z5b-6a mid-MI (My Page) on
      Sun, Mar 4, 12 at 11:30

    Oops - so sorry for assuming.
    PhotobucketI went back in forth in my mind about it. I wanted to point out you 'had the tools' to get things done, but 'this person' sounded so impersonal that I took a chance based on your forum name. Again, I apologize.

    Interesting about your name. Mine is my wife's and my name spelled backwards.

    The bark in the second picture above is still too big. Look for something half that size & you have it. The last 'finished soil' picture looks good but too fine - you'll love it though. One big hurdle is to get to the point your soil is open enough that when you water you can really flush the soil w/o worrying about root rot issues. Close after that is being able to minimize the effects of water retention on root function. My guess is that you're probably past the former and really close on the later, so things should be a lot easier for you from now on.

    Al


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    RE: Peace Lily for indoor planting

    The plants are doing well. They only 'drooped' for 24 hours after re-potting and now 4 of 7 are pushing out new leaves. 2 of them were big bunches of leaves. 1 was a small bunch of young leaves. 1 only had one leaf but it was young and is now pushing out a second.

    I'm concerned about the other 3. 2 of them have 1 leaf, 1 has 3 leaves, but all the leaves are "old". Prior to the replanting they had already produced the leaf that grows off their stem (which probably died due to the problems it was having) and now my concern is that they can't produce new leaves.

    Of course 7 plants is way more than I need or can give away so if they don't it's not the end of the world. What do you think? Will these plants be able to create new leaves?

    I have not watered at all. The soil is still moist. I was looking around for the Dyna Grow 939 you suggested, but haven't found it yet. In case I don't, what should I look for as an alternative? I don't know anything about fertilizer.

    Still looking for the more suitable bark. I've got some Coleus seedlings growing in a tray with a store bought seedling soil so I'm going to need more soil when they get big enough to plant. Going to keep looking, the smallest I've found so far was that Scotchman's brand.


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    RE: Peace Lily for indoor planting

    • Posted by tapla z5b-6a mid-MI (My Page) on
      Wed, Mar 7, 12 at 16:28

    Will these plants be able to create new leaves?

    Probably, but hard to say for sure. Even if the apical meristem (area where growth originates) is damaged or removed, the plant will dedifferentiate some of it's cells and then redifferentiate them into a new area from which growth can occur (a new apical meristem). The key is, it has to have enough stored energy to add to any energy currently being produced through photosynthesis to keep the plant's systems operational throughout the process. If the plant is too low on energy reserves, it will expire. The most likely deciding factor would probably be found in whether or not the damage was due to rot. The short answer is "take good care of the plant while you wait and see". So far, you've done GREAT. Strong work!

    .... what [fertilizer] should I look for as an alternative [to FP 9-3-6]?

    The Dyna-Gro isn't easy to find. Try a hydroponics shop or two, but they'll prolly try to sell you on something 'better'. You can order it online if you want. My second choice would be Miracle-Gro 12-4-8 liquid in the yellow quart jug. It should be widely available at this time of the year.

    I'll leave a link to a thread about fertilizing plants in containers. You can read it if/when you get time, if you'd like to. It makes understanding fertilizing containerized plants pretty simple. You can always ask any questions you have here or there. I'll keep an eye on both threads, in case you think there might be anything I can help with.

    Take care.

    Al



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    Oops!

    • Posted by tapla z5b-6a mid-MI (My Page) on
      Wed, Mar 7, 12 at 16:31

    I forgot the link ........ Photobucket

    Al

    Here is a link that might be useful: More about fertilizing containerized plants if you click me.


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    RE: Peace Lily for indoor planting

    Yeah, MiracleGro is easy to find here. Pennington and Bayer are too.

    According to Dynagro's website I'd have to drive to Dallas to get it, or order it online. Not driving to Dallas any time in the near future but I might order online.

    I'll definitely read the article later tonight.


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    RE: Peace Lily for indoor planting

    This is what I got from re-screening the leftovers from my first attempt with a 1/2" cloth instead of the 1/4" cloth. (So basically, this is double screened, which removed the fine compost and large pieces).

    I've been reading some other old threads from Texans looking for the perfect bark here on GardenWeb, but it looks like most of them did what I am doing, only with the Scotchman brand which seems to have less of the sapwood. I'll probably get that one and screen next time it if I don't find anything better.

    Photobucket


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    RE: Peace Lily for indoor planting

    For whatever it's worth, I just finished screening a bag of pine bark mulch for my first 5:1:1 mix attempt, and what I ended up using was "egg crate" - plastic fluorescent light diffuser. It's essentially a rigid plastic half-inch grid, about $5 for a 4' x 4' or so piece at the box stores, and easily to saw down (or even snap with pliers) to smaller sizes.

    I just took a piece large enough to cover a rubbermaid tote, scooped handfuls of the mulch on top, and then brushed the oversized pieces into a 5 gallon bucket. I've got a couple of smaller screens I use for bonsai soil, but this was much easier and faster for doing a 1/2" screen of the pine bark.


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    RE: Peace Lily for indoor planting

    Thanks Nonliteral, that's pretty much exactly what I did... rubbermaid and all. But I used Hardware cloth, which is a metal screen.. aka "chicken wire" in various sizes. No clue why the call it CLOTH, cause it's not. But that's what it is called.


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    RE: Peace Lily for indoor planting

    Ok, so I got the Miracle grow, though the soil is still moist right now.

    I saw you recommended ~30 drops per gallon to tecnico with the 9-3-6. Should I use that same guideline with the 12-4-8?


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    RE: Peace Lily for indoor planting

    • Posted by tapla z5b-6a mid-MI (My Page) on
      Fri, Mar 9, 12 at 13:37

    Wait until about 2 weeks after repotting, then fertilize with a dose that's half of what is recommended for houseplants. You can do that at 2 week intervals if you're flushing the soil when you water. Come late Sep, you might want to either go to 3 week intervals or reduce the dose to about 1/4 the recommended rate & stay at the 2 week interval.

    If you transfer some of your fertilizer into a contact lens solution bottle and LABEL IT CLEARLY as fertilizer (for obvious reasons), it will make it very easy to dispense doses into measuring spoons for mixing your solution.

    Al


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    RE: Peace Lily for indoor planting

    Just an update. Looks like those 'concerned' plants aren't doing so well. They have started to wilt and develop brown spots and holes in the leaves. I'm going to let them go on their own until they fully die but I'm not holding on to hope.

    Ah well, 3 out of one still pretty good and at least one more seems to have a chance to grow a new leaf but its not doing well, it's developing holes in the existing leaf.

    Already gave one of the 3 healthy plants away to my co-worker. Another will go in my office. I replanted those 2 again because I think the pots were just too small, but I didn't re-do the soil for fear of shocking them again. I pulled out the plant retaining as much of the soil ball as I could and added more to it in the bigger pot on the bottom and sides. They seemed to not care and are still going strong. Going to do the third one that way too.

    I've found the self watering pot my coworker wanted to use actually useful, but not the way they were intended. I can flush from the top without directly draining and then pour off the excess out of the watering funnel. If given the option between the normal attached saucer or the self watering saucer, this is better. Though I still like the idea of draining into the saucer of stones. I may do that one yet.

    Aside from the Peace Lily, I've been taking advantage of this new experience. Replanted a rather healthy but root bound poinsettia in the second batch of soil I made with the 1/2" screen. This batch turned out much better, a lot less fine that the first, still a lot of sapwood though. I mixed this batch with the 5:1:1 ratio.

    Photobucket

    Photobucket

    My seedlings are doing well, currently they are in a store bought seedling soil in a tray. Can't wait to get them in the window boxes, but they have a month or so before that happens. I have Unwin's Dwarf, Columbine, English Daisy, Alyssum (purple and white), Bachelor Button, Coleus, and a white and purple "bluebonnet looking" dwarf plant I can't remember the name of. I just wish I'd started them in January, another week and we will be beyond the last possible freeze for my area... unless we have a weird April again. Even still, it's balcony gardening. I can always bring it inside.


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    RE: Peace Lily for indoor planting

    Al, bad news I guess. Your theory that fungus gnats wouldn't be attracted to pine bark didn't pan out. They are already swarming the peace lilies.


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    RE: Peace Lily for indoor planting

    I am a newbie here. I have been lurking since last night. I have been soaking up your advice. If I should start a new thread, please let me know.

    I have a peace Lily that was given to me 6 months ago when my father-in-law died.I recently (about a month ago)re-potted the peace lily in an 8in. mainstay pot with a connected tray. I used the premixed soil from Walmart that had fertilizer in it already. The plant was doing really well until recently. It has started exhibiting signs of salt damage. Last night I put it in my shower, and gave it a good rain. Then I tilted the pot, to empty out the water that accumulated at the bottom. It already looks much better.I am going to try doing this more frequently, and stop watering in small doses.

    I live in Kansas, so this is always indoors.I am worried about the winter approaching, because my house will get really dry, and my husband has asthma, so extra humidity is not good for him.

    So I am wondering about how to set up a humidifying tray for it. One of you mentioned putting stones in a tray underneath the pot. Could you elaborate more on that?

    I also have a question about fertilizer. I know you don't recommend the pre-made soil like I am using, but the next time I re-pot, which will likely be in the Spring, I may try one of your blends, but I need to find a way to fertilize, that still allows me to water with my shower, since that seems to work the best, so far. Any suggestions?

    Thanks to both of you, you have been most helpful already.


     o
    RE: Peace Lily for indoor planting

    This is my peace lily.

    Here is a link that might be useful: Peace lily


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