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Fungus or insects on fiddle leaf fig?

Posted by SBinHB 9 (My Page) on
Tue, Apr 9, 13 at 20:41

Can anyone tell me what is affecting the new growth on my fiddle leaf fig? I have had it about 4 months and the new growth on this stalk has these red spots and is very dry at the tips. The leaves are also not growing as large as those on the other stalk. I have googled but haven't found anything that looks close enough to this.
Thank you!


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Fungus or insects on fiddle leaf fig?

It looks like a virus, ive noticed it on my dracaena limelight


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RE: Fungus or insects on fiddle leaf fig?

Oh wow, I never would have thought of that. Will it just go away eventually? Will it spread to other plants (this is the only fig I have)? The other stalk has a couple of smaller leaves with a similar look but then the newest growth is larger so maybe that part of the plant has recovered?


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RE: Fungus or insects on fiddle leaf fig?

well im not coming to conclusions, whait for someone else to comment, if it is a virus, keep it away from other plants.
it can also be a nutrient defieciency. try fertilizing and repotting


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RE: Fungus or insects on fiddle leaf fig?

  • Posted by tapla z5b-6a mid-MI (My Page) on
    Wed, Apr 10, 13 at 15:31

How cold has the plant been? What are you using for fertilizer? This happens in FLF a lot when soil moisture levels are mismanaged. EITHER too wet or too dry.

If it's a pathogen, suspect the fungal problem to be Corynespora leaf spot - (Corynespora cassiicola). It can be controlled by proper fertilizing and eliminating misting or wetting the foliage when you water.

Al


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RE: Fungus or insects on fiddle leaf fig?

I fertilized with Oscmocote a few months ago but I suppose it's time to fertilize again - I think it was a 4 month formula.
I only water it at the base and just wipe down the leaves with a damp cloth once in a while to get rid of dust. The plant is by a sliding glass door but it doesn't get very cold. I am in southern California.
I think it needs to be repotted as well or potted up. There are roots trying to come out of the drainage holes on the bottom. The soil drains well and I let it dry out until it feels dry about an inch down, and then I water it again.
Thank you so much for helping.


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RE: Fungus or insects on fiddle leaf fig?

  • Posted by tapla z5b-6a mid-MI (My Page) on
    Wed, Apr 10, 13 at 22:02

It sounds like it does need repotting, but a Ficus that is simply root bound isn't reason enough to rush to repot so early in the growth cycle. I'd wait about 2 months and then do a full repot, as opposed to simply potting up. If you're watering when the soil feels dry an inch below the surface, and you're watering from the bottom, you're over-watering. I suggest you get a wood dowel from the hardware, or use a bamboo skewer as a 'tell'. Push the stick deep into the pot, and don't water until it comes out clean and dry.

There are tricks you can use that will help to reduce any ill effects your plant might be suffering from a soil too heavy, and we can easily get you on a fertilizer supplementation program that should prove very favorable for your plant. If you're interested, let me know what you think about what's been discussed so far. In the meanwhile, I'll offer some reading that should help you a lot, if you take what you read to heart. In almost every case where the plant is savable, all it takes is getting to a place where the basics (light, temperature, fertility, and soil choice/watering habits) are out of the stressful zone .... and it's not that difficult. Plants often tolerate being grown under conditions that stretch the limits for what they are genetically programmed to tolerate. I've never been happy with plants that just survive, so I've been searching for ways I can improve the things that impact my plants' vitality - ways to help them thrive instead of just survive, and I have a LOT of Ficus.

This thread is an overview of growing in containers, and will help you avoid the pitfalls that bring so many to the forums looking for help.

This one is specifically about growing Ficus trees in containers , and should offer some more specific direction.

If you think there is anything else I might be able to help you with, don't hesitate to ask. Best luck!

Al


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RE: Fungus or insects on fiddle leaf fig?

Thank you, I will read through both of these links. When I said I was watering from the base, I meant at the base of the plant where it meets the soil, so as not to get the foliage wet. Does that make sense? But I will get a dowel of some kind to help me know when to water. And I will wait a couple more months to repot. Do you think I should fertilize in the meantime?


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RE: Fungus or insects on fiddle leaf fig?

  • Posted by tapla z5b-6a mid-MI (My Page) on
    Thu, Apr 11, 13 at 16:57

How often & how much you should/can fertilize depends in large part on what your watering habits are like and what your soil allows you to do in the way of flushing the soil when you water. I've found that all my plants respond best with frequent low doses of fertilizer. Indoors, plants get fertilized every time I water. When they're outdoors, I fertilize weekly at a little less than recommended doses. I also suggest that a minimum standard for a soil that is acceptable, should include the requirement that you be able to water to the point of saturation and beyond whenever you wish, without having to be concerned that the soil will remain wet so long it negatively affects root health or function. Most soils commonly being used for houseplants don't meet that minimum, and trying to amend them so they do is often not fruitful.

If I knew you were watering copiously at each watering, it would be easier to suggest a good nutrient supplementation program, because it's only with some knowledge of your watering habits/soil type that anyone can give anything other than very general advice. Water retentive soils complicate plant care; well-aerated, free-draining soils simplify it. Even so, there are tricks that can help you deal with unwanted water retention and help you avoid some of the inherent associated issues. The tricks won't resolve issues like compaction and levels of aeration insufficient for best vitality, but they will prevent the worst of what is commonly caused by excess water retention.

The link below highlights some ways of dealing with unwanted water retention. I think it would be to your advantage to use one or more either until you come up with a suitable soil, or regularly if you stick with something that gives you cause to be concerned about water retention.

Al

Here is a link that might be useful: Click 4 tips ..........


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