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Arrowhead?

Posted by lescont 7 (My Page) on
Sun, May 12, 13 at 10:42

This is my arrowhead plant I got about 2 weeks ago. I looked it up online after I got it but haven't really been able to find any pics that look like mine. Maybe because its young? It's leaves are light green and have pinkish tint which is darker in middle of leaves, and the bigger the leaves get the more pink, is this right? I think I did read somewhere that their color changes with more light?


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Arrowhead?

There are various Syngoniums, but the ones I have, the new leaves are more pink, and fade to mostly green tones as they age. As an epiphytic vine, it's easy to overwater. It looks like there are 6+ individual plants in your pot. Each might grow more better/more quickly if they were unpotted, separated, then potted with a little space between each. Back in the same pot would be fine, maybe in a ring with 1 in the middle.

Yes, you will find different exposures result in differently colored leaves, to a point. Easy to burn, so experiment carefully, gradually. The one I have is at its' most pink when there is no direct sun on it.


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RE: Arrowhead?

Thank for the advise I will separate them now. I already separated some into a new pot this is the bigger of the two.


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RE: Arrowhead?

You can get multiple growing points out of a single Syngonium stem if there's some damage. Nurseries probably do that to give the pot a fuller look. Even so, you can still split them up, they root so readily (to the point of being an invasive weed, LOL). There's a lot of varieties available now. The juvenile leaves are very different to the adult leaves.


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RE: Arrowhead?

Looks to me like the one exotic angel calls "Exotic Bold".

Here is a link that might be useful: Exotic Bold


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RE: Arrowhead?

It looks like there's an attached drain saucer about an inch deep on that pot, which means an inch of standing water could be in there sometimes. Constantly soggy roots in a pot can/will rot. I would encourage you to snap that off. Then when you water, do it at a sink until water runs out of the holes in the bottom. When it's finished dripping, it can rest back on the drip tray, no need to snap it back on.


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RE: Arrowhead?

that's exactly why I buy those pots. So I can snap the bottoms of. I do drain them and when I'm done I set them sideways so the holes do not line up that way it still drains and if I didn't let it sit in the sink long enough I can check it and dump it. it also keep the holes off the bottom of the drip pan so if there is extra water its not sitting in it. I was looking at my soil this morning and you were right it holds way to much water even for here in the dessert. I am going to walmart tomorrow and will me getting some more soil and a bunch of perlite to mix in...Will that be ok for the houseplants with just potting soil and a lot of perlite? For the succulent cuttings you sent me I was going to also add a lot of pebbles? Should I do that with the other plants too? Looked online last night and those were the only things I could find that is close. Anything else I have to drive to phoenix for, which is 4 hrs away. Even to get that stuff I have to go over an hour away for but I will be in town anyway for groceries. Sorry rambling again...
-Leslie


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RE: Arrowhead?

I knew there was something about you I really liked, LOL! Being anal about drainage is worthwhile, IMO. Great plan! With that technique, you should do well with about any plant, not counting placement errors like too little or too much sun, or stuff that's beyond your control, like low humidity. But that's what succulents are for, and many other plants reportedly cope well (with low humidity) with good watering practices, such as you've described.

Tiny cuttings and single leaves are known to take root well in perlite by itself. Good texture, difficult for bacteria to live in.

I feel lost trying to advise much about using/amending store-bought potting soil. What I do is so different, with hardly any store-bought stuff. I would hope you can find the answer in one/some of these discussions. Others will see your question here too.

The pebbles, to my limited and yet short experience with these kinds of plants and the pics you see on the C/S forum, are a top-dressing for appearance. Pebbles don't make sense to me in a pot since they just use up space while offering nothing in return, and are no help with drainage in conjunction with tiny particles of peat which would just lodge against the pebbles and conform to their shape. Helpful if you need more weight though. Some people are huge fans of adding pebbles.

I prefer little bark chips over pebbles or perlite, but they do decompose so repotting has to be done more often. If the pot is full of roots, I don't see why not to repot whether or not the organics in the pot have turned to mud. I like doing that. If you hate doing it, that's probably a good reason, but roots never stop growing, so most plants will generally decline after a period of stagnant roots. Bark chips are probably with the outside gardening stuff, with the mulch. A huge bag should only be a few $$'s.

Like you said, it's hard to find unusual stuff where you are, same here. Combine what's available with the advice, and come up with something you can do. As long as water runs right out as fast as you can pour it on, the plants should like it. Many people add whatever amount of perlite until they get it "like they like it" and it works well.

Whatever you do will have to be replaced in a year or two anyway, so don't stress about it too much. It's not like tropical storms are going to show up and drown stuff in AZ. Between controlling the water, and making an effort at filling the pots with something that water runs right out of, the future looks great for your plants!


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