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ficus pandurata vs lyrata

Posted by chuy415 9 O.C., Ca (My Page) on
Fri, May 25, 12 at 17:46

Can anyone tell me if pandurata and lyrata is the same ficus? I just purchased a ficus pandurata and am searching for information on how to care for it... got it on clearance for $5.00 I believe its in an 8 inch pot. I recently moved to Northern Utah and am missing all of my plants i had in Orange County California :(... so i've been slowly getting plants.
thanks for anyones help

Chuy


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RE: ficus pandurata vs lyrata

  • Posted by tapla z5b-6a mid-MI (My Page) on
    Fri, May 25, 12 at 18:54

Pandurata/lyrata = synonymous.

Al


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RE: ficus pandurata vs lyrata

thanks Al... wanted to make sure... any advice on how to care for it?? Chuy


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RE: ficus pandurata vs lyrata

  • Posted by tapla z5b-6a mid-MI (My Page) on
    Sat, May 26, 12 at 21:53

There's some good advice at the thread I'll link you to.

Al

Here is a link that might be useful: More if you click me ...


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RE: ficus pandurata vs lyrata

Maybe someone can tell me if I got the right thing, too? I went looking for a fiddle-leaf fig tree today and found two at Home Depot. I got the smaller one because it fit in my car (the much bigger one couldn't), but now that I look closer at the tag it says: Ficus Pandurata Bush. So I didn't get a tree?


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RE: ficus pandurata vs lyrata

  • Posted by tapla z5b-6a mid-MI (My Page) on
    Mon, Oct 29, 12 at 19:20

Your question has a technical answer, but I suspect you're more interested in the practical considerations. First, a TREE would be woody plant with a single perennial stem at least three inches in diameter at a point 4-1/2 feet above the ground, a definitely formed crown of foliage, and a mature height of at least 13 feet.
Shrubs usually have several perennial stems that may or may not be erect. They will usually have a height less than 13 feet and stems no more than about three inches in diameter.

Practically speaking, you can make a tree bush-like by truncating its leader and allowing the multiple co-dominant leaders (essentially branches) that subsequently occur to continue to co-exist as separate trunks, which is exactly what occurred if your 'tree masquerading as a bush' has multiple stems.

You got a tree, but it's normal growth habit was altered because of how it was pruned. It's fixable if you want a single-stemmed specimen, but it takes some time.

Al


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RE: ficus pandurata vs lyrata

Ficus pandurata and Ficus lyrata are two different species, Their valid names are Ficus pandurata Hance, and Ficus lyrata Warb.
So unless the plant was mislabelled, as sometimes happens in retail outlets, it is Ficus pandurata.


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RE: ficus pandurata vs lyrata

A bush is a tree with more than one stem, sometimes pendulous or reptant.


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Dwarf Ficus B?

I have a Ficus B. and have had it for several years. It started out having three trunks and I wanted to have a braided trunk so I braided it and used twist ties to keep it braided, it really doesn't seem to have grown hardly at all. Like it is stunted or maybe I have a pygmy fig or something. I know they can be slow growers but seriously I'm talking I braided it like probably eight years ago!


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RE: ficus pandurata vs lyrata

  • Posted by tapla z5b-6a mid-MI (My Page) on
    Sun, Oct 20, 13 at 21:03

When your containerized trees stall, look to root congestion first as the most likely cause. Root congestion inhibits growth, which is why when people pot up they think they subsequently see a growth spurt, which really isn't a growth spurt at all - just the plant growing a little closer to the potential it was genetically endowed with. In order to get the most from your plant, it needs regular repotting, which includes bare-rooting and root-pruning, but repotting is best undertaken in the summer months - around Father's Day. For now, I would try potting up as a temporary measure .... and start using an appropriate fertilizer, too. I suggest one with a 3:1:2 RATIO, ratio being different than NPK %s. I use Foliage-Pro 9-3-6 on all my numerous ficus, as well as my other containerized trees

Young trees with smooth bark approach graft (fuse) much faster than older trees with bark already starting to fissure, but any of the ficus will fuse eventually if you keep them viable long enough.

Al


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