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Sedum inside

Posted by purpleinopp 8b AL (My Page) on
Tue, Oct 9, 12 at 10:09

Have had many in outside beds but wonder, do plants of this genus need a dormant period? Any experiences bringing one inside for winter?


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Sedum inside

Morning Purple,

Funny you should ask.

I have a variegated Sedum outdoors in the garden..I too wondered if the hardy variety needed a rest or would thrive indoors...Thought about bringing in a couple leaves and stems for rooting, etc...Toni


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RE: Sedum inside

Purple..since you just started this thread, I'm bumping it back to the top...Toni


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RE: Sedum inside

p,

There are many cold-hardy Sedums (which need cold) - some are deciduous, and some are not. To complicate things, there are many Sedums which are not cold-hardy. It depends on what you have, so I guess a picture would be needed. In a guess, I'd guess the highly-succulent Sedums tend to be non-cold-hardy. These are the ones which are also used in intergenetic hybridizing, with Echeveria making a Sedeveria hybrid, with Graptopetalum making a Graptosedum, etc.


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RE: Sedum inside

I love sedums,I have quite a few varieties in my outside garden. I think for indoors, depending where you are located, you would have to use grow lights because they do require a certian amount of sun. I would love to hear how they do,if you decide to try it.


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RE: Sedum inside

Thanks for the inputs!

Seems we have another changed name:
Hylotelephium spectabile. I think most of the garden Sedums are related to this one, or cultivars of it, reportedly hardy from Z 3-10, so I was hoping dormancy isn't necessary.

I love an experiment and will probably bring in the piece that broke off of the plant below. Should be plenty of sun in S or W window.


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RE: Sedum inside

One of my first houseplants was Sedum. No problem at all.


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Oh, you're speaking of Hylos - what I understand is those are cold-hardy; I'm still finding out if it's necessary for cold-hardy ones to get cold as part of their normal life cycle. The plants that I have are all in the ground and all deciduous. You can also get into Rhodiola too - lots of fun (also a genus formerly included in Sedum) - this one's R. pachyphyllum.

Photobucket


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RE: Sedum inside

'formerly included' is incorrect - it's how the Sedum folks divide it up now. Formerly, they were all Sedum.


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Ah Sedum spectabile, have one in my garden, flowering now. Ive also had one indoors.


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Jeff...don't know if you can tell by the pictures, but here goes.

garden plants

The green Sedum was planted several years ago..the name on the pot read, Autumn Sedum. lol.
Variegated Sedum said variegated Sedum..it might have had a botanical name, but I didn't check. Variegated was planted spring 2010 or 2011...
The variegated is the Sedum I'd like to try inside.

What do you think? Thanks

Purple, love the red of your Sedum's stems..


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RE: Sedum inside

Hi Folks,

That blooming Sedum several of you've shown seems to grow here as well, or something looking very much like it. Here it's commonly called an Ice Plant & I think they bloomed locally about a month ago. I've seem the blooms vary in color from light pink to hot pink &/or fuschia (what used to be called magenta in Crayola crayons).


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RE: Sedum inside

Interesting inputs!

I've only heard ice plant used for Delosperma. The common names I've heard are stonecrop or live-forever.

Pretty, Toni! Yes, those are 2 of the kind I'm curious about.

"what I understand is those are cold-hardy; I'm still finding out if it's necessary for cold-hardy ones to get cold as part of their normal life cycle." Excellent rephrasing of what I'm curious about! If cold temps are going to knock them down, no reason not to break off a few pieces...


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RE: Sedum inside

I know it as Ice Plant too, but common names are nothing really.
As for it needing cold to flower, nope. Mine was a autumn flowering houseplant before I put it in the garden.


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RE: Sedum inside

I bought a sedum tonight, it was in the house plants. I will see how it does.


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RE: Sedum inside

Polly, if you have a minute and feel like posting a pic, I'd love to see the Sedum you got in the house plants section. I hope it does well!

If you feel like doing so, you can find your zone here. There's a box where you type your ZIP code, then hit enter. Are you familiar with garden zones? If you include it in your profile, it will show up next to your name when you post. It's not terribly important to house plant discussions but can be helpful. Not to mention how satisfying it would be to the collective curiosity.

Interesting, Larry, thanks! It's a pretty good common name for this plant, which I've often seen with blooms covered in ice when I lived in OH. I get homesick for snow sometimes, but not ice!


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Howdy,

Purple, your Sedum is packed with flowers..So nice.

Only problem I have seeing Sedum in flower is...it's nearing winter...

I too have heard Sedum called Ice Plant and Stonecrop.
A nursery in IL has a Kalanchoe called Live Forevers. Definatly a house plant..it'd die outside during winter.
Common names.

Purple, did you take a cutting, or will you wait until Sedum stops blooming?

I like snow for Thanksgiving and Christmas, heck, even New Year's, but wish spring would arrive between Feb/Mar. lol. Toni


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RE: Sedum inside

I broke a piece planting it in the ground. Thinking it's probably too late for it to establish in the ground. And then got to wondering when I could harvest most of the growth from the mama if winter is going to cause the above-ground part to die. Maybe by spring those 5 or 6 branches could be ready to put in the ground. Just don't want to do it too soon that their loss causes problems for the roots to grow back next year, or so late that the cold has already killed the tops.

I love a good common name discussion. They're interesting and fun, often informative, and highlight the role and importance of the proper names. In the case of "ice plant" one can assume it's not unusual to see them with ice on them. Or with live forever that they're not hard to please and are reliable perennials or house plants.


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Interestingly stonecrop Sedum is a native wild plant in england, Ive seen it a few times in country walks!


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Purple, hardy Sedum is evergreen..Leaves can redden when cold, but they remain on plant..Of course, flowers die back.

It can't hurt to take a small cutting, see if it roots..if not, no biggie. I'm going to try a leaf and stem cutting..

I agree...common name discussions are fun..ironically, most common names are/were in plant books, and still listed on plant name tags.

Larry..everytime I see the word, Stonecrop, it reminds me of Stonehedge..lol..


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I was moving and popped cuttings in the ground today. I wondered if I could bring some indoors or at least on my sun porch in pots to overwinter. I have several varieties of what I have always called Sedum. They are evergreen in my garden. I might try to do it tomorrow and see how it goes.


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RE: Sedum inside

  • Posted by rina_ 6a Ont (My Page) on
    Sat, Oct 27, 12 at 21:27

Warning - photo overload...

I would not try to grow hardy sedum indoors simply because it will survive the winter outside, and there is never enough room indoors for the plants that have to be protected. Same with hens&chicks...just my opinion.

I just stick any broken branches back, even flower stalks. Almost all will root.

Some of the hardy sedums in my garden:
(photo #6: in pots, grown from broken branches, potted approx. Aug. 2011. I think it is 'Purple emperor'. They all overwinter outside.)


Photobucket Photobucket Photobucket Photobucket Photobucket Photobucket Photobucket Photobucket Photobucket Photobucket


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Rina your pictures are beautiful! I would just like to have some of the cuttings a bit bigger before I put them in the ground next spring! I have a great deal of room to fill in my yard, a plethora of plants that I need to trim because they are overrunning the sidewalk and pots a plenty. And I like to experiment..LOL

If they get a head start for the spring, cool. If it doesn't work, ehh well. I cut and directly rooted about 20 this summer and I am thinking of using them in another bed or two next year.


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Rina, great plants!! I especially like the one on the bottom row that's partnered with the yellow stuff!

Liz, that's how I feel, experimental.

Toni, (Hopeful,) it's been a while but I could swear I remember walking around in the spring looking for these things to come back up in OH (also Z5.) There's so many of these, it's not surprising there's some confusion. No idea what they do here. Evergreen would be great!


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Liz

thank you.

I would probably try it too if I had more space inside...
I really find them easy to root - not sure how much they will grow now (I am similar zoone to you). I typically keep any seedling, try to save any broken branch. Have way too many pots outside with orphans (haven't met plant I did not like, lol).
Even most common hedging cedars - swamp cedars, lost count of how many I have given away once they get few inches tall.
I love to experiment too, sometimes it works, sometimes doesn't.

BTW, sedum spectabile grows from seed very easily. Just scatter some seeds, after seedheads dry, on top of soil in pot. Should have nice seedlings in spring, by fall they are usually at least 4-5" tal.

Rina


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Rina..Fantastic Sedums, very colorful.

Your purple-leaf Sedum, when pic is expanded, reminds me of Kalanchoe. So pretty.

Do you keep Hens & Chicks/Sedums in containers outdoors during winter months?

Purple..you were searching for Sedum? Hmm, I'm confused. I might have a pic of Sedum snapped in Jan/Feb...maybe..usually it's too cold to even think about stepping outside, let alone take pictures. :)

BTW, did you decide to experiment? Take a leaf/cutting, try rooting indoors?


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Purple, just as I thought..not many winter pictures..
However, I found a Sedum pic taken in May 8, 2009. Tulips made an appearance, but the majority of garden plants gone/dormant, including Ornamental Pompass and Japanese Grasses..two large clumps in the photo.

We've had many-a-snow-storms in May, often snow covering the tallest plants.

Sedum is green.

Sedum


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RE: Sedum inside

  • Posted by rina_ 6a Ont (My Page) on
    Sun, Oct 28, 12 at 14:38

Toni

I keep many perennials in containers - some wood boxes, few concrete planters, couple iron urns, and many in plastic pots (I do have few terracota pots, but they always crack).
But I have many of the same planted in ground too.

I like moving plants around, so pots are great. And looks like there is 'new' garden every year!!!
Rina


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Rina, you certainly have acquired a good number of colorful plants..I browsed an email from another thread, (sent from GW)...read where you said you 'adopted' more plants since joining GW.. That'll do it. lol.

Most of my container plants happen to be house plants, and usually end up where they were previous years.

But, I agree..moving 'outdoor' plants in containers around makes one feel they have a new garden. :)
Wish our house rooms were large enough to change furniture, so I can feel we moved, which I want to do, but dh doesn't. :(

So, perennials in containers will live through cold winters?
The few planters wintered outdoors are used for annuals. I didn't know perennials would thrive icy-cold winters in pots.

Do you grow Dahlias? Their flowers are breath-taking. This year, I planted a few varieties outdoors, some are still in bloom, but the problem is, I don't know when to dig up corms.

I posted this question on the Midwest forum a couple years ago, but didn't get many replies, none worth-while.

I also Googled, but answers were few and very generic.

Dahlias corms are very expensive. I'd like to keep those I have before they freeze.
Have any idea when they should be dug up?


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  • Posted by rina_ 6a Ont (My Page) on
    Sun, Oct 28, 12 at 16:30

Toni

I grow just few dahlias; I lift tubers when night temps are consistently around 0*C around 30-32*F).

It's recommended to do it after first 'killing' frost, when leaves & stalks turn all black.

I lift cannas at the same time, and Colocassia (taro-elephant ear); Just do it all at the same time and have it over & done with.

I have so many different perennials in pots, it's not funny, lol. I would say that almost every plant I have in soil/garden, I have also in a pot, including perennial bulbs,and even herbs.
You don't want me to start naming them...

I read somwhere that plants should be hardy couple of zones lower to overwinter safely in pots. But I push it little sometimes.

I usually group all pots, most often surround them with chopped-up leaves for some insulation, and that's it.
I have lost some, and it was plants with really water-logged soil. So good drainage if most important.

Last fall I left some ivy in the pot (it was planted together with some lilies and few other perennials), and it started to grow back in spring-winter was milder then usual. It will stay in the same pot this year, if it comes back-OK, if it doesn't, that's OK too - photo below.
Rina


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Ok so I had the 3 cuttings in water (with roots already forming) when it was time to bring all of the plants in. I hastily stuck them in a little pot. The tops have died but this is what's going on (pic below.) I expected the top parts to die since I had let the cuts sit in water so long, kind of an accident, laziness. That always happens when I try to put a rooted Sedum back to soil. They really should go straight to soil, IME.

The little flower in the middle I accidentally broke off of the last tall piece that was still alive, about 2 weeks ago. So I just stuck it in the middle and it's been in suspended animation ever since. Still pretty. Growing? IDK... I guess this is my smallest plant at this point. I know, I know, it's wet! I should have taken the pic B4 I gave it a rare drink... usually this pot looks like the desert.


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Well after becoming more interested in succulents this winter and realizing some of these plants I thought were jades before are really Sedums, I'm even more fascinated.

These little sprouts are doing well, have grown quite a bit since the last pic.


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How are these guys doing now? I had a fine leaf stonecrop sedum inside for about three months before the cat decide to use the pot for personal reasons. Now my pots have rocks in them and the kids are keeping the litter box full of clean litter, or else. Next summer I'll buy another one to bring indoors. It's such a pretty and delicate sedum. Would love to know how your experiment is progressing.


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These did well, though grew slowly in the house, sunny windowsill. I put them in the ground in the spring and I think they're dead now from flooding this summer. There's a few small pieces around in mixed succulent pots, but since they were rescued tips from plants under water, they are still 'not right.'

You mentioned not being a gardener when you lived in AL (in another discussion,) and I think you avoided a lot of frustration. It's wild to garden here, one summer it doesn't rain at all, 100+ degrees for weeks, the next it rains for 2 solid months, barely knocking on the door of 100 degrees a few times.

When I started this discussion, I didn't realize how many Sedums there are as house plants. The kind I always knew were temperate yard plants, which is what the one I started this discussion about ('Autumn Joy') would be in OH. I've since found several other kinds which seem happy in pots so far.

These kinds of plants are most appropriately discussed on the cacti/succulent forum, now that I know that. If you browse around over there, you'll probably see more Sedums (and other cool cousins) than you could ever have room for, I know I do!

I think my fav that I have is this cute little thing. Jelly bean plant, S. rubrotinctum.


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RE: Sedum inside

I have some broken off tips of varigated sedum like yours, purple, that I rooted and have inside since September. So far they are doing all right, but they insist on blooming out of every leaf axil they can find. I keep disbudding, since I wanted them to make roots, but they seem to have other ideas. I hope to put the cuttings outside next spring, and then we'll see what happens. About the vari sedum, I see in your photo that yours also loses the lower leaves and looks not as nice as the regular plain green ones. I sort of don't like that about this plant. It's like the idea of this plant is better than the actuality.


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Pretty! The clay pot's a great idea for that guy. I think Toni (hopefulauthor) is the one with that pretty plant. If it wants to bloom, I'd let it. Sedum flowers are pretty, especially if they're pink. They key to growing any Sedum well is full, non-stop sun, excellent drainage. Too much water can cause exaggeratedly large, floppy growth. I wish I had a penny for every floppy, overwatered patch of 'Autumn Joy' I saw in mixed perennial beds in OH. Now that I know not to put it near plants that need to be watered, I'd love to find some yard Sedum again.

I believe all of them off this type have been renamed Hylotelephium. Is it hardy where you are?


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