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Sansevieria growing VERY slowly.

Posted by MissMariah CA (My Page) on
Sun, Dec 4, 11 at 19:53

Hi there. I have several snake plants who are much adored members of my house jungle. However, they are growing incredibly slowly. Three of the plants of them only have two or three mature leaves, with one or two tiny little guys poking up from the base, and they seem to have hit a plateau. They've been in this stage of non-growth for at least two or three years now. Every now and then one will pop up a new leaf, but that is a really rare event. I've tried re-potting (and saw healthy roots when I did, but not loads of them), I've tried changing locations (although, they do stay indoors year round), I've tried watering various ways (on the advice of several different "experts"). I tend to fertilize every few months (rarely in the winter) and I am currently watering them sparsely (re: waiting until they are very dry.) With the exception of one, they are all in rather large pots for the few leaves each plant has, and I'm considering downsizing, but thought I ought to wait until spring. Oh, also, they are potted in just your standard miracle grow potting soil. I'm just not sure what to do at this point, other than wait them out. Am I treating them wrong? I would love to have them flourish, and to actually have them flower. I've never had that happen before!! I would appreciate any help and advice sent my way. Thank you!


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Sansevieria growing VERY slowly.

I have several sans. (bird's nest and snake plant) and I have them all potted in Al's Gritty Mix. I've found that sans tolerate neglect very well, but will accept all the love you want to give them.

IMO, if you want them to flourish, you need to increase their light, transplant them into fast soil (well draining), and fertilize weakly-weekly. I've never seen my sans flower, but mine do produce pups frequently.

I've repotted plants in the winter before. I don't think it matters too much as long as you water carefully. I can't recommend Al's Gritty Mix strongly enough though.


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RE: Sansevieria growing VERY slowly.

Hi MM,

I agree that Sans. don't care when you repot them. Also, if you wish to keep using that mix, I'd had add about 30% Perlite to it, even more. I'd keep them potted on the smaller side, they seem to like that.

Although none of my Sans have never bloomed for me, I don't fertilize mine very often; I don't believe in doing so for succulents.

My Sans. have improved some since I've started watering them more frequently, but I use fast draining mix.


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RE: Sansevieria growing VERY slowly.

  • Posted by tapla z5b-6a mid-MI (My Page) on
    Mon, Dec 5, 11 at 11:14

I think there's a natural tendency for growers to draw the conclusion that because their plant didn't die when they repotted it in winter, that it must follow that the plant really doesn't care WHEN it's repotted. First though, let's draw some delineation between repotting and potting up. If you're potting up, it doesn't matter when you repot, as long as you watch the watering, but potting up in winter can present difficulties because the plant isn't going to quickly colonize the new soil with roots, so it will remain wet for extended periods if using a heavy, water-retentive soil ...... and it's less likely you'll be able to water properly w/o risking root rot.

However, during winter and spring is when most houseplants plants are weakest and at the point in the growth cycle where recovery from a repot, which includes bare-rooting and a change of soil, will be slowest. Repotting between Father's Day and July 4th ensures the plant has had time to recover from the winter's energy depletion and rebuild reserves. The longest days of the year occur in the weeks immediately before and after Jun 21 - which is why Father's Day provides a good point of reference.

It's not that most plants won't TOLERATE winter/early spring repots, most will if they are growing well & have some energy reserves. What we're talking about are comparative degrees - not so good, good, better, best. For houseplants other than winter growers, the farther you get outside of the ideal period mentioned, the more difficult and extended the recovery will be, and the greater the chance of problems related to a weakened plant will be - insects/disease/shedding parts .....

"To every thing there is a season, and a time to every purpose under the heaven ..."

Miss M - Plants often 'hit the wall' as a result of extreme root congestion or impaired root root function that keeps them from taking up sufficient water and nutrients. The best fix for this common issue re Sans is to divide or do a full repot. I would wait to do that until summer, but there are some things you can do now. First though, can you tell us how much soil there is in the pot that hasn't been colonized by roots, if any? BTW - if your planting has some soil that hasn't been colonized by roots, or if that soil falls away from the root mass when you check it, it's not enough to eliminate root congestion as a candidate for probable cause. Once plants become severely root bound, the effect on growth and vitality is an ongoing issue - no matter how large the container they're potted up to.

I'll wait to hear what you have to offer. ;-)

Al


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RE: Sansevieria growing VERY slowly.

That potting soil doesn't drain very fast. I agree with everyone else, they need to be in a different potting medium. I use a cactus mix that sounds like Al's Gritty Mix, which I've never seen or heard of before, but found a recipe online.

I have one that I rescued from someone's garbage years ago and it doesn't grow too fast, either, but it grows faster than yours. I keep it outside unless we have a hard freeze. It's bloomed several times.


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RE: Sansevieria growing VERY slowly.

Hi all,

Thank you for your advice! I think, per Al's advice I will wait until Summer to repot, unless emergency repotting is deemed vital by you all. However, I am going to look in to Al's Gritty Mix, for sure! I don't think I've seen that at my local HD or Lowe's, but I'll dig around until I find it or something similar. Thanks for that. It seems per all of you, that a much more well-drained soil is necessary! I will also cut back on my fertilizer application. It seems I may be loving my poor plants TOO much!

Al, in a few of my pots, the vast majority of my soil has not been colonized by roots. The roots are a healthy-looking orange-ish color (similar to others I've seen in photos around here) with the hair roots coming off, but the root bundle is very small. For example, I have one Sans. in about an 8-inch pot, but MAYBE 3% of the pot has been colonized by roots, and only immediately under and around the two large leaves and two tiny spikes that consist of that whole plant. And when I last had that plant out of the pot to change the soil (one of my "improvement" efforts) the soil just fell right away from all of the roots. No soil ball at all. So root-binding is the total opposite of my problem for sure! The pots are probably way too large for my suffering Sans.

I'm thinking that the drainage seems to be the most important issue right now, perhaps? It doesn't get terribly cold here (I'm in the Sacramento area) but the house is never what I would call "warm" this time of year (typically in the mid-60's during the day.) And I've noticed that the soil of the one plant that I described above has not been drying out well. The others seems to be drying fairly well, at least in the top layer of soil.

Thanks!
Mariah


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RE: Sansevieria growing VERY slowly.

  • Posted by tapla z5b-6a mid-MI (My Page) on
    Tue, Dec 6, 11 at 12:50

If you're over-fertilizing, or dealing with a high level of solubles (salts) in the soil, it will show up in the condition of the foliage in the form of burned leaf tips and margins. If you don't have that issue going on, you're not over-fertilizing .... at least not to any significant degree.

You have two things that you don't often find hand in hand. If you're using a peat based soil, it's a fairly safe bet the plants are over-potted, which makes a healthy root system much less likely, especially if you recognize there's a drainage issue. How long has it been since you potted up? What is the condition of the foliage? Can you describe the light conditions?

Al


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RE: Sansevieria growing VERY slowly.

Oh! Wait... Is the Al in "Al's gritty mix" the Al above and is it a personal recipe for a soil mixture? I just caught a clue and caught the connection between the names. *facepalm*


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Slow growing Sanserveria (Website made me change subject line!)

Well, I don't think I am over-fertilizing then, as I don't have any evidence of burnt foliage. That's a relief! I just have very LITTLE foliage. Lol!

I am using just the regular Miracle Grow potting soil from Lowe's. I've always had pretty good success with it before with my other plants, but they are more typical "house plants" (like those viney things that I can never remember the name of but are so common and hardy they can make it in offices and restaurants, assorted palms, "jungle plants", and the like.) So... That being said, I'm not really sure if it is peat-based or not. I'm fairly sure not (when potting, it seems like your typical potting soil, with some chunky organics tossed in) but can't swear by it.

The last time I potted-up was about... Three months ago? So the end of September, early October? The leaf condition is healthy, what leaves there are. They stand up-right on all five plants (with the exception of one leaf on one plant that persists on listing horizontal for no particular reason that I can see.)

The light conditions tend to be moderate to bright but very in-direct light during most of the year (three are located on the west side of the house and two are located on the north side of the house, but the house has loads of windows). This time of year, with the short days (sun is going down at about 4:30 right now) the light is pretty solidly in the low to moderate zone. Especially on over-cast days.


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Potting soil

Or is Miracle Grow a peat-based potting soil, and I'm just unaware of that fact? Possible...


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RE: Sansevieria growing VERY slowly.

Hi MM,

I believe generally around here we believe the MG mix to be peat based mix.

Does the water just sort of sit on top when you water? Maybe take along time to start penetrating the mix?

OR, from the other direction, do your pots of mix harden to rock when you forget to water? That would be a sure sign of it.


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RE: Sansevieria growing VERY slowly.

Hi Pirate Girl,

Yes, and yes. I find that in my current potting soil, that water tends to penetrate fairly slowly, and then when it does, it usually follows the path of least resistance... Re: the edge of the pot where the hardend soils have pulled away from the container. Or the "aeration" holes I've poked in the soil with chopsticks.

So... Peat based, then? Does this mean I should repot my poor Sans. now into a gritty mix (I've been researching Al's Gritty Mix on the forum!) regardless of the December date? Or would that, in their not-so-robust state, do more harm than good than just waiting it out until warmer weather?


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RE: Sansevieria growing VERY slowly.

It will likely take you a while to assemble all the ingredients for the gritty mix, so waiting may not be an option. Fortunately, sans are very forgiving. I'd say to start searching for ingredients (good luck with Turface :D ) and carry on.


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RE: Sansevieria growing VERY slowly.

That is good advice. I found a fabulous post by Jessica on her gritty mix adventures, and while she is up in Washington and three (large) states away, some of her references of where I could try to find the materials might be relevant to me as well. More than folks on the east coast, anyway! But yes, I think I will start the search now, and work to find the ingredients THEN worry about whether to repot or not. How very logical! ;)

I'm a tad worried about the Turface... My first stab at Googling it came up with a New Zealand source. Eep! I think it is a VERY good thing Sans are forgiving, yes indeed!


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RE: Sansevieria growing VERY slowly.

I am not sure where you are located, but I found turface at Simplot Soil Builders in Idaho. You might check to see if there is one in your state. Be sure to get the MVP, the other bag they carried was very fine, very little material was left after screening.
Good luck.
Tami


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RE: Sansevieria growing VERY slowly.

Hi MM,

I'm on the East Coast & have the luxury of a pumice supply, so I haven't gotten into the gritty mix, since I make my own fast draining mix.

But what I suggested earlier to change your mix, for the short term you could get new mix, maybe cactus & succulent if you can find it & add 30% or perlite or more to hold it over to Spring 'til you can assemble the ingredients you need.

Almost ANY other mix will be better than what it's in now; what it's in is more important than the time of year to change it.

I change around the potting of my Sans. w/out regard to time of year cause my mix drains quickly.


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RE: Sansevieria growing VERY slowly.

I think I may have a potential turface source here in the home town! There is a John Deere Landscaping only about 6 miles from where I live. I'm calling them in the morning to see if they carry it in-store (their website says they do, but I find website cataloging to be sketchy at best.) Yay!

Thanks, Tami... I found the John Deere Landscaping by Googling Simplot Soil Builders locally, found one about half an hour away, but their website connected me to distributing sources of turface, thus tying me in to JDL. Networking as only one can find on the Interwebs! :-)


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RE: Sansevieria growing VERY slowly.

Glad I was able to help nudge you in the right direction. I am experimenting with gritty mix. I have transplanted a few plants, succulents mostly into it. So far my biggest challenge is figuring out the water requirements, especially during winter.
Tami


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RE: Sansevieria growing VERY slowly.

  • Posted by tapla z5b-6a mid-MI (My Page) on
    Wed, Dec 7, 11 at 10:18

I didn't name the gritty mix 'the gritty mix'. That's a name someone hung on it after making it for the first time & it sort of stuck, but it does seems appropriate. The recipe is what I use as the base from which I make all my long term soils - soils for anything I think will be in the same soil for more than a year, but it's really the concept behind what makes the soil so productive and easy to grow in that's important - more so than the recipe. The idea that you can expect to grow healthier plants with greater ease and with a wider margin for error in a well aerated and durable (long-lasting) mix composed primarily of particles larger than what you could in heavier soils is what is being put forth and supported.

You have LOTS of Turface sources near you, so that shouldn't be a problem. Check out any of the several Ewing Irrigation outlets, too. Ask for Turface MVP or Allsport.

Just another note on (full) repot timing: While a free-draining soil that doesn't support perched water can eliminate the problems associated with over-potting that are more prevalent and persistent in winter and early spring due to shorter photo-period and photo-intensity (and in some cases temperature), soil choice can't alter the progression in repot timing from least favorable in winter to increasingly favorable as early summer approaches. That factor is solely dependent on the plant's natural growth/energy cycle.

Al


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RE: Sansevieria growing VERY slowly.

Thanks, to all of you, for your advice and guidance! I will work on fixing my soil problems for my struggling Sans both in the short and long term. I have very high hopes that switching over to the "gritty mix" (looking at the photos, Al, that it is a very appropriate nickname!) will do wonders. I will report back in with any results (and any further questions!)

Thank you again! I'm so very glad to have found you all on the forum.
Mariah


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RE: Sansevieria growing VERY slowly.

  • Posted by tapla z5b-6a mid-MI (My Page) on
    Wed, Dec 7, 11 at 14:14

If you find yourself with spare time, the link below the text (Overview) will take you to a thread that presents a good overview for beginners. You should find it very helpful, and hopefully thought provoking to at least the degree it brings up additional questions.

For more information about soils, try this link to a soil discussion on this forum,

or you can try this link to a more detailed discussion at the container gardening forum.

Al

Here is a link that might be useful: Overview


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RE: Sans growing slowly.

  • Posted by tapla z5b-6a mid-MI (My Page) on
    Wed, Dec 7, 11 at 16:37

Ahhh - I just came from the container gardening forum and noticed that you had already found your way there, that you had joined in a conversation on a related thread, and that, fortunately, you have some folks with as much enthusiasm as you seem to have helping you out. That's great.

Tami - if you're still following ...... you'll find that even though conventional wisdom dictates that you should always water on an 'as needed' basis, that bit of wisdom is built around the supposition that you're using a soil that supports a significant amount of perched water. At cause, and the reason for the admonition, is the excess volume of water that lingers in heavy, water retentive soils after a thorough water. Adopting a soil that holds little or no perched water eliminates the reason for the admonition and renders the advice almost inapplicable. While it IS still BETTER to stay in the habit of watering on an as needed basis, using fast draining and highly aerated soils that support little or no perched water allows you to water on a schedule with very little or nothing in the way of ill effects.

This winter, I'm watering most of my plants in the gritty mix at 4 day intervals, some every other day; but it should be noted that these plants are all in small soil volumes. In the larger soil volumes commonly used by most houseplant growers, 5-6 day intervals would probably be closer to a reasonable interval between waterings.

You simply have much greater latitude when it comes to watering habits if using soils that essentially eliminate any serious threat of the root issues commonly associated with soils based on fine particulates. Salt build-up, also a serious impediment to attractive foliage, is also easy to prevent in soils that can be watered copiously at every watering with no concern for accompanying root issues.

Al


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RE: Sansevieria growing VERY slowly.

Watering correctly seems to be a challenge for me regardless of the mix I use. I am a recovering serial killer of house plants. I am trying succulents in the hope that my "neglect" will be appreciated by them since most house plants seem to resent my lack of TLC.

The gritty mix has proved great for the succulents that are in smaller pots. The exception has been some stressed plants that didn't do well, probably related to the poor condition they were in when I purchased them. I am watering according to; the feel of the soil (stick my finger in the soil), feel/appearance of the leaves, and weight of the pot. I also keep track of when I water on the calendar.

The positive comments from others prompted me to try gritty mix on part of my plants. Al, I appreciate the time you spend helping others by sharing your expertise.

Mariah, sorry to take the conversation away from your original question about your Sans.
Tami


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RE: Sansevieria growing VERY slowly.

ARGH! Help! Ok, so one of my pots of sans was reeeaaaallly retaining water (like never drying out) so I thought in the short term, I'd pull it out of it's overly huge pot and re-pot just this ONE plant right now and wait until summer to re-pot everyone else in the gritty mix. I was going to try to jimmy a quick fix with perlite and cactus potting soils that I have lying about in the garage. Just to get it through the winter, and to not be a damp mess all winter long (I had re-potted it in September-ish, and it was not ever really drying out and starting to grow some grey fuzzies on the soil surface. Not good even to my un-knowledgeable mind.) So I thought, "Why not?" Just this one... And so I pulled the plant and I found NO ROOTS!!! It had roots three months ago! Not lots, but they were there!!

Enter panic. I have no access to any gritty mix and will not until late next week, at the earliest, when I can get out to buy the materials. So do I put this poor suffering rootless (well, there is ONE root) Sans of three spindly leaves into a small pot with loads of perlite (like 60 or 70%?) and some soil, just to get it through until I can get it into a gritty mix? Or have I written it's death sentence?

And no worries, Tami. See how I just brought it back around to my Sans in panic mode? ;-) Besides, every time there is a tangent, I learn something new.

Mariah

PS: I took a photo to show the horror to you all, but I can't figure out how to post it into my message.


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RE: Sansevieria growing VERY slowly.

  • Posted by tapla z5b-6a mid-MI (My Page) on
    Thu, Dec 8, 11 at 9:28

For the photo - open an (a free) account with a web photo hosting entity like Photobucket or others, and then just post the HTML link they will provide in the text box along with your message.

When you said the root system was small, though healthy; and that you also had some water retention issues and the soil simply fell away from the roots it immediately sent up a warning flag that there might be something amiss with one of the assessments. I replied, "You have two things that you don't often find hand in hand. If you're using a peat based soil, it's a fairly safe bet the plants are over-potted, which makes a healthy root system much less likely ...." because in my mind's eye I was picturing the small root system not being as healthy as you might have thought and resultant of the soggy conditions in the root zone.

Fortunately, sans are one of the toughest plants out there. I think the perlite idea is a good one, though it's good to remember it's a good idea to always rinse your perlite before you use it whenever it's more than a small fraction of the soil, to help rid it of some of the fluorine-containing compounds. You should also trim off any rotted roots so you're trimming back to healthy tissue. A quick dip in a 10% solution of (unscented) regular household bleach and water, or a 10% water/hydrogen peroxide (using the common 3% solution of peroxide) would help with the fungal infection. Alternately, a dusting of cinnamon or flowers of sulfur (at the pharmacy) would also act as an effective fungicide.

If you contact me off forum, I'll see that you get enough gritty mix to take care of your repot ...... and that way, you'll be able to gain a feel for what you're trying to achieve.

Also, there is no need to panic just because you don't have 'the gritty mix' or any particular soil, for that matter. The gritty mix is just the best way I've found to implement a concept. You're on the right track, moving toward gaining an understanding of what's required to keep roots happy. No happy roots = no happy shoots. Once you get that part firmly implanted in your growing psyche, you'll have significantly increased the probability that you'll be able to consistently maintain your plants in fair fettle. ;-)

Al


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RE: Sansevieria growing VERY slowly.

I agree with Al.

You could use pure, rinsed Perlite until you get a better mix.
I'd rather use Perlite by itself than a mix of peat and Perlite.


Josh


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RE: Sansevieria growing VERY slowly.

I was going to suggest pure Perlite (to let the poor Sans dry out & stabilize), but thought you all would think me nuts. I was remembering Jon Dixon (anybody know what happened to him?) suggesting a number of yrs. ago to root things in pure Pumice (which I've also started to do w/ excellent results).

I'd not heard one needs to rinse the Perlite, so thanks Al.


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RE: Sansevieria growing VERY slowly.

  • Posted by tapla z5b-6a mid-MI (My Page) on
    Thu, Dec 8, 11 at 15:05

Roots love air - it's that simple. The more air you can manage to build into the rhizosphere (root zone) the better plants like it ..... and that goes for cuttings, too, which is essentially what Miss M is dealing with - a large sansevieria cutting. The only problem is plants love air so much it can be an inconvenience for the grower, so we try to select ingredients that provide both air AND water. The perlite (screened or dust rinsed out through a kitchen strainer or insect screen), because of the fact it lacks internal porosity, is best at holding air (between the particles), but it does hold a fair amount of water on it's irregular surface, making it a very good medium for starting cuttings or retrieving a wayward sand from the maelstrom immediately above the drain it's circling. I like an appropriate sized pumice even better than perlite though - because it holds a little more water and still provides the aeration of perlite on a size for size basis. I know I'm getting just a little off track here, but one thing you DON'T want to happen with cuttings, is having them stuck in a mix so water retentive that the bottom of the cutting is below the level of the PWT, so the root end of the cutting is covered by water, which cuts off the very important air supply.

When you're thinking 'cuttings', or retrieving a plant from the brink, think about as much air as you can get in the root zone.

Al


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RE: Sansevieria growing VERY slowly.

Hi all,

Thank you all for the response and guidance at my moment of panic! I'm much calmer now... ;-)

Last night I potted the sans in a fairly small pot of maybe 80% perlite, but tonight I'll take it out and replace that with 100% rinsed perlite to hold the poor thing over and dry out what is left of it's roots. Or root, as the case may be.

I am now convinced you guys are the best EVER!

Also, I'm attempting to attach a photo with the URL. Here's hoping it works! SUCH a sad plant! If I've done it right, happy dance all around. If not, I'll try again.

Here is a link that might be useful: Pathetic Plant


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Trying photo again...

Clearly I can follow directions. *rolls eyes*

Photobucket


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RE: Sansevieria growing VERY slowly.

  • Posted by tapla z5b-6a mid-MI (My Page) on
    Thu, Dec 8, 11 at 16:51

Good job. I'd give it a 9 out of 10 chance (90%) of pulling through.

Lol - feed your faith in yourself through your learning and your panic will starve. I don't know how old you are .... not old, I think. As I've grown older, I realize that many of the most significant things I've learned, done, or overcome, were at the outset things that scared me half to death.

Al


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RE: Sansevieria growing VERY slowly.

Al, I feel like I should call you "Plant Sensei" and bow with proper respect. ;-)

I'm in my early 30's, but proper plant care, and gardening in general, is pretty new to me, so I feel very unsure with every step that I take. I guess that confidence will grow as I try things, see what works, figure out what fails (bagged potting soils, clearly!!) and grow from there. I'm just glad to be learning so much now, so that I can stop the plant-abuse that has been occurring in my household!

A quick question on watering in pure perlite, once I get the little guy into it. I'm guessing it should be fairly often, given the very quick drainage and the dry winter conditions of the house right now? Oh, and as additional information, the little pot it is in now is terracotta. And should I fertilize it at this stage of the game?


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RE: Sansevieria growing VERY slowly.

I'll give it the same odds... ;-0

If Pumice is available, I'd take Pumice over Perlite, too.

Pumice has the added benefits of being weighty (thus, holding cuttings and containers in place)
as well as abrasive, which can stimulate root-branching.

If not, no worries. Perlite is easy, clean, and cheap.


Josh


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RE: Sansevieria growing VERY slowly.

No, it shouldn't be watered fairly often; part of what I'd suggested here is letting it dry out, which can't be accomplished if one keeps watering it. No fertilizer either, we save that for when plants are in active growth, which sounds like this is not now. You could wait 'til it recovers & Spring comes. (Succulents don't get as much fertilizer as regular houseplants as a rule.)

If you're new, you may not know that what distinguishes succulent plants from others is their ability to hold water in reserve in their leaves & stems. So it can hold its own water until it roots, it doesn't need you to add water to it very often. When I do this (on rescued plants or those given me), I'm pretty stingy w/ the water.

One of the main ideas we promote here about succulents, when it comes to watering is:

When in doubt, don't. You'll see, the plant will likely be just fine.


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RE: Sansevieria growing VERY slowly.

  • Posted by tapla z5b-6a mid-MI (My Page) on
    Thu, Dec 8, 11 at 18:27

I would wait 2 weeks & then fertilize with a half dose of a soluble 3:1:2 ratio fertilizer. I won't go into details about RATIO vs NPK %s now, because you've prolly run up on the information in your reading. You'll go a long way before you'll beat Foliage-Pro 9-3-6 (a 3:1:2 ratio) as your 'go to' fertilizer. I use it for almost every single plant I grow, and have, for at least 3 years now. A good second choice would be any of the other 3:1:2 ratio soluble fertilizers, like Miracle-Gro 24-8-16 0r 12-4-8. Several other manufacturers also make a 24-8-16 equal to Miracle-Gro. I like the Foliage-Pro 9-3-6 because unlike most soluble fertilizers, it also provides Ca & Mg in a favorable ratio. Another plus it offers is in the fact that it also provides most of its N in Nitrate form, which helps keep plants from stretching out in low light - helps to keep them bushy/stout/compact.

I would screen or rinse the fines from the perlite & use a wick in the bottom of the container.
Photobucket

Photobucket
just to be sure there isn't any perched water to speak of. The cool thing about the wick is it will also serve as a 'tell'. When the wick feels dry where it exits the pot, it's time to water.

Don't worry about the confidence thing. That will come - especially since you have so many here willing to help you knock all the t's off the can'ts.

Al


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RE: Sansevieria growing VERY slowly.

Oh! Thanks for that, Pirate Girl. I did know that about succulents, but for some reasons didn't really think the same about the Sans. Don't know why. I'll be sure to be sparing, then!

Btw, I came across some of your photos today, of your rooted cuttings in another Sans conversation (I think you were growing with Leca stones, maybe?), and your process was very cool!

Al, the wick idea is awesome! And thanks for the photo-guide. I have the materials for that in my "crafts" bin, so I'll put that together when I repot the sans into the rinsed perlite (I don't have any pumice, so the perlite will have to do for the short term.)

Also, I'd seen mention of the Foliage-Pro 9-3-6 in other conversations and found it on Amazon last night. It has already been ordered and is on its way. If I'm going to do this, might as well run full-tilt, right? ;-)


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RE: Sansevieria growing VERY slowly.

Ok, here he is, in his new temporary home! Pure (thoroughly rinsed) perlite... Fingers crossed from this point out until I get him into the gritty mix. (I think it is funny how it kind of looks like I planted the sans in Styrofoam bits.) The rock is there for a ballast... I think it was Josh that said that one of the reasons he uses pumice was for the weight and stabilization. I could definitely see why with the light-weight pumice vs. the top-heavy sans!

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RE: Sansevieria growing VERY slowly.

Light-weight PERLITE. Not pumice. Sheesh...


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RE: Sansevieria growing VERY slowly.

OK, good, it looks fine, pls. don't worry about it. Now just let it be for a week or so, then water the perlite a bit (around the outer edge of the perlite, not into the plant).


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RE: Sansevieria growing VERY slowly.

Yes! Well done, Mariah.
Good advice, Karen.

Josh


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RE: Sansevieria growing VERY slowly.

Now your next challenge/project is the Adenium/ Desert Rose in the back round there.

Great job.

Mike"-0)


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RE: Sansevieria growing VERY slowly.

Sansevieria Forum - GardenWeb is a slow traffic forum that is occasionally visited by some rather knowledgeable persons. If you still have unanswered questions post them there and wait. The answers will probably trickle in.


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RE: Sansevieria growing VERY slowly.

Ha ha, Mike! One plant rescue at time for me right now. I've got a long way to go before all of my jungle is a healthy one. ;-) I can't wait until I can get things into the gritty mix.

Here's some exciting news, though... DH and I just found out that the offer we put in on a house was accepted. Come the end of January, I will have an acre of yard to play and learn in! OMG! So excited! The things I'm dreaming of... My mini-orchard, herb garden, veggie garden, butterfly garden, pond... Not to mention 2700 square feet of new home for the indoor jungle. Wait... Did I just said one thing at a time? ;-)


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