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viewing bermuda types

Posted by bill_ftmyers_fl zone10 SW Florida (My Page) on
Mon, Apr 14, 08 at 19:02

Im in florida and just bought a house. I would like to put a nice bermuda lawn down. I want to mow it around 2 inches or so. I think most of the green (or sub green) grades like princess and riveria are out.

Can blackjack or laPrima be able to handle that mowing height? Of the two varities, which is finer?

Is there some where I can go to see all of these varities growing? Do most golf corse pros know what kind of grass they have? Or should I just find the grounds guy?

I know alot of questions. If you can help me, great.

Im in fort myers area.


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: viewing bermuda types

Why bermuda? Why not St Augustine or zoysia? All of these are invasive but bermuda and some of the zoysias can be more aggressive and harder to control than St Augustine.

The golf course people should know but they may not. Ask them. If the course was recently installed they should definitely know.


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RE: viewing bermuda types

Look for Empire Zoysia. It appears to be commonly sold zoysia in Florida. You can mow them at 2 inches unlike bermuda which looks best at one inch. Zoysia requires far less mowing (half the mowing frequent of bermuda) and fertilizing than bermuda (1/2-2/3 less). They look a lot better too. Bermuda isn't worth it in my opinion.


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RE: viewing bermuda types

None of the Bermuda grasses you mentioned will perform well at 2-inches. It can be done, they just will not be really thick. For that height you really need to go to a low quality common type. You can see all the ones you mentioned at www.bermudagrass.com.

FWIW La Prima is not a variety, it is an unknown blend blend of bermuda grass.

Any golf course should know exactly what grass they have.

So if you are not willing to keep Bermuda at 1-inch or less and do th ework required Bermuda demands, you need to look at something else like Saint Augustine, Zoysia, or Centiweed.


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RE: viewing bermuda types

I like the looks and feel of bermuda, thats what Im going with. It does take alot of maintenance but I have no problem spending 4 hours a week on a small lawn.
My sister has zoysia and I realy dislike it. Its very course, light green and does not spread fast. I have a 75-pound dog and need a grass that can grow back and take wear and tare.
St augistine grows back well but cant take the stress and I dislike the wide blades of st Aug.

I got this from handcockseed.com

Riviera can be maintained at mowing heights from 0.5 inches
(1.3 cm) to 2 inches (5 cm). Applying 3 to 5 pounds of nitrogen
per 1000 square feet (1.5 to 2.5 kg/100 square meters) per
growing season is adequate. Do not remove over 1/3 of the leaf
blade per mowing for healthy turf. More frequent mowing at
shorter heights will result in a finer, more dense turf.

Im guessing this can go for all of the bermudas that the shorter its mowed the more dense it becomes, hence light loving grass and it can shade itself out.

Anyway, is there any turf testing facility I could visit to see all the different varities being grown at different heights in florida?


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RE: viewing bermuda types

Those guys are on a mission to talk everyone out of bermuda. I have 45 years experience growing the grasses listed here and I can tell you I have grown to love Bermuda when the yard has enough sun for it. My sahara bermuda and Princess 77 do well at any height from 1/4 inch to 3 inches. I had experimental plots last year and the Bermuda was super dense and looked great at 3 inches contrary to popular belief. Wish I could help you with your research in Florida but I can't. I think you could plant almost any variety and with good soil and fertilizer you would get good results.


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RE: viewing bermuda types

rdaystrom,

That is such stupid comment. We are simply saying that there is better alternative to devil's grass for homeowners. Majority of my neighbors can't keep up with bermuda's invasiveness and their plant beds have been taken over by bermuda so they look bad.

I've yet to see nice bermuda lawn at 3 inches height. I see a lot of browns at the bottom. Maybe if you scalp it every month, it'd look decent but not the entire growing season.

Who the heck wants treeless property just to have a nice lawn when it's 95+ outside with the sun beating down on the house driving up energy cost? Zoysia is less invasive and can tolerate some sun yet looks a lot better with a lot less mowing at 2 inches and fertilizing a lot less compared to bermuda.


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RE: viewing bermuda types

Like I said, I realy dislike the texture and color of zoysia. I like bermuda. I planted sahara at a friends house, I landscaped his entire yard. It came out good. Im just curious about other varities.

To every one trying to stere me away from bermuda, QUIT IT!


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RE: viewing bermuda types

Bill, I am not trying to steer you away from Bermuda, for Petes sake I am a sod farmer in TX who's farm is mostly Bermuda. OK?

I take it from the varieties you have mentioned so far you are looking for a seeded and/or common variety, and have budget restraints that prevent you from laying sod. IS this right?

The varieties you have mentioned so far are improved common types that have medium to medium fine texture. They can be maintained at 2-inches as long as you understand that is not the optimum height. By growing them at that height means you give up density and risk some weed invasion that you would otherwise not if maintained at a lower height.

Here is what I do not understand and maybe you can help me to understand. You stated you do not mind spending 4-hours per week on your lawn and that it is small. Correct? Then what prevents you from maintaining at say 1-inch by mowing twice a week?

Since you live in FL the world is open to you for Bermuda selection since you have no winter freezing temps to deal with. If you really want a Bermuda variety that performs well at 2 to 3 inches here are some to consider.

Arizona Common (dirt cheap)
Cheyenne
Jackpot
Mirage
Guymon
U3 (fine bladed in both sod and seed)
Sundevil
Yuma
Mohawk
Savanah
Triangle Blend ( I would really look at this one as a blend will most likely be your best bet because one of the varieties will dominate to your conditions)

If you think you want to go at 1 to 1-1/2 then consider the ones you have listed like Princess, Riviera, Yukon, La Prima Blend etc Just be aware these types are not the ones you will see at golf courses, they just are not the fine texture types, or put another way hybrid.


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RE: viewing bermuda types

Thank you. That helped. I guess I could mow down to one inch, I was thinking that if I keep it a bit higher that would shade the soil a bit more and let my weekely watering last longer. I guess there could be some arguement with that since your stating that a one inch bermuda is thicker than a two inch. Ill play around with it.

Lastly to clarify. Your saying common bermuda is finer (thiner) than the hybrids? Of the hybrids, what is the thinnest (finnest)?

Thanks.


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RE: viewing bermuda types

The finest textures (fine and dwarf) are hybrids from sod only. Hybrids like TifDwarf, TifEagle, TifGreen, TifBaby are dwarf varieties made for golf putting greens which are micro fine texture.

The ultimate for high-end yards, fairways, t-boxes, and sportsfields are fine textured like TifSport, Tifway-I, Tifway-II, Celebration, and Patriot which are sod only also.

All the ones you have listed are medium and coarse textured from seed. The point here is the fine and dwarf textured varieties are from sod only and really require high input maintenance like mowed down to 3/4 of an inch and less with a reel mower 2 or 3 times a week.


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RE: viewing bermuda types

lou_midlothian_tx, When did you stoop to the level of name calling. I suppose with your limited knowledge base you had to resort to calling my comment stupid. I understand. Maybe if you would research a little more before you post you would contribute more.
If you have never seen a nice Bermuda yard at 3 inches you haven't opened your eyes much. It takes more mowing but it can happen. I've done it along with thousands of others. It's preposterous that you would say something like that. No name calling here. Have a good day my friend.


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RE: viewing bermuda types

Bill I am totally on board with you. I want a Bermuda lawn too! I grew up with a Zoisa lawn and absolutely hated it. It was coarse, needed tons of water, needed to be at least 3 in tall to look green and wouldnt tolerate any traffic. St. Augustine is most popular around here in Dallas/Fort Worth area. I ran several lawn care companies as a teenager and definitely think St. Augustine is every bit as invasive as Bermuda. It also requires about 30% more water. As a proud new home owner I thought that Bermuda would be my 1st choice. However as a recent Graduate of Texas A&M I decided to check back with
My old Turf Management Major roommate works for the Houston Texans. . His only caution is that Bermuda needs a ton of sun. Probably wont be a problem for you in Florida unless you have a bunch of trees.

Based on his advice here is what I did.

1. Soil Test- Came out A OK. Already had plenty of St. Augustine growing green so I expected as much.
2. Pruned all trees to a height of about 6 ft. Scalp and bag the whole yard followed by Round-Up on the whole Yard- 3 weeks ago.
3. This past weekend rented a 10 HP tiller and went to town on the whole yard. I thought this would be hard, but got all 5,000 sq ft knocked out in about an hour. Probably tilled up the 1st two inches
4. Hand raked the whole yard smooth, took about another hour.
5. Spread 50 lbs of La Prima Bermuda from SeedLandUSA with a broadcast spreader.
6. Hand raked in the seed.
7. Spread 10lbs of 15-5-20 Fertilizer.
8. Spread about 1 wheelbarrow full of top soil on top with a broadcast spreader. This just gave the whole are a really light dusting of top soil about 1/8" thick.
9. Watered everything in to jus short of a mud consistency.
10. Water again every day. (Has been raining all week so havent really needed to, but as soon as the sun comes out I will be watering again every day for 3 weeks)

Ill check back with you and let you know how it goes. Dont worry about those other guys. It sounds like low maintenance is far more important than appearance. I would much prefer the golf course fair way look to the parking lot landscaping at Wal-Mart look. I am totally sympathetic to your seeing your lawn as a source of pride and not just another chore. I have already purchased a reel mower and plan to mow no higher than 1". Yes I know this means I will probably be mowing every 2 to 3 days, but most of us could do well to have the extra exercise. I already have a few seedlings coming up and they are at least twice as green as the sodded St.Augustine I used to have! Ill try and check back with you later and let you know how things are coming. However, NOW is the primo time to plant Bermuda, if you want anything resembling a lawn this summer.

GOOD LUCK!!


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RE: viewing bermuda types

Hey Bill

Dude I tried the lovely Bermuda route too. I spent $24 per 1pd. bags for LaPrima and Laprima XD last summer over 5 times. My best results are a 2x2 area in the front and a corresponding 1x2 area on the side...thats an entire bag! I even did a few bags of P77 from Lowes. Oh and my first year I did a couple bags of cheapass Sahara Bermuda from WalMart...(that grew !)
The good news is .. the LaPrima XD stuff is lovely-GORGEOUS ! rich green, soft ,just lovely the bad news is I didnt get enough ROI ...that is it just didnt take root or fill in in the bare spots, I mean for a 1pd bag and thats all the grass that i got to grow.
I went a different route since then ..Combat extreme..having GREAT results.
But Bill, If I could get that LaPrima XD to grow, that would be my CLEAR choice, hands down!


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For what it's worth... I went from St Augustine to Bermuda. I hated yard work with a passion! Hired it out. When we moved to a new house my wife wanted a finer blade grass. I ALMOST went with P77 until TW talked me out of it and into Tif419. I'm too far north for P77. Anyway a new Tru-cut 25 came with the deal and now I'm a mowing fool! I just love that mower and cutting that grass, I'm now mowing 2-3 times/week at 3/4" (only 4000sqft) and walking it everyday looking for a weed to pop it's head out! People walking by stop and offer nice compliments, it's great! Best part for me is that all this extra yardwork (that I now enjoy) is giving me some much needed physical activity, I'm not nearly as stiff as i used to be :) Only real problem that I think might have me whooped is some common Bermuda has started showing up.


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RE: viewing bermuda types

LOL there appears to be a lot of bermuda haters out there. I personally love the stuff. I have 419 in Georgia and keep it cut under an inch while my neighbor keeps hers cut at two inches. There is a slightly different in appearance but both look great. The difference is I have to cut mine more often while she has to be careful not to miss a cut. If she does, then the higher height makes it suspect to scalping. The link shows my lawn in the foreground as cut at 3/8 inch while the neighbors across the street is at 2 inches. FWIW the Tif station is coming out with a shade tolerant Bermuda next year.

Here is a link that might be useful: viva Bermuda


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RE: viewing bermuda types

Wow, Trplay! That's the nicest Bermuda I've ever seen... Great job! Can you take a larger picture and one closer to your neighbor so that I can see how 419 looks at 2 inches?

That bermuda looks as good as my Bluegrass/Ryegrass lawn, I can't believe it.

BTW, I'm no bermuda fan. Having said that, I'd like to commend the OP for choosing bermuda over St. Augustine. In Florida and in Full sun, there's no reason to have St. Augustine unless you like its looks (I think is hedious, it resembles cultured crabgrass)(sorry to those St. Augustine lovers) I grew up in Miami and that grass is everywhere down there.


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Well Autech now maybe you will quit telling folks they should not grow Bermuda in Georgia. As long as they have full sun Bermuda is an excellent choice.


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Follow up

Trplay.

Great lawn guy makes an ole TX sod farmer heart swell with pride. I can tell you use a reel mower from the stripping effect. Looks like a golf fairway or maybe first cut of rough. Excellent!

I have relatives in Atlanta and Raleigh, just finished a two week vacation there in both cities and toured around like I always do. One pattern emerges quickly if you are observant, especially if you are a sod farmer like me, is the older neighborhoods or neighborhoods with lots of trees use the cool season grasses, and the newer built or lots without trees grow warm season grasses primarily Bermuda. Make perfect since to me.


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RE: viewing bermuda types

Thanks for the comments, coming from you guys it swelling my head. I enjoy working the yard but unfortunately I seem to only learn through mistakes and I sure have a handle on that.

I just saw your post wanting photos, I'll try to get some this week but I've attached an October photo with the grass cut at 3/8th. Another fun factor with bermuda is the art canvas it provides. The other photo is an example of stripes using the morning dew.


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RE: viewing bermuda types

  • Posted by mmqb NC--7 (My Page) on
    Wed, May 20, 09 at 8:59

I have a mix of Black Jack, Sonesta and Majestic that I keep at around 1 inch--I just use a regular mower, not a reel. I have a nice lawn--maybe not golf course quality but definitely nice. I don't know how successful you will be at 2 inches with a bermuda grass because over 1 inch the runners tend to go vertically instead of horizontally. I read some where that sting nematodes are a big problem in Florida, so be sure that you properly protect your lawn for them with insecticides if you decide to go with bermuda. Good luck.


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Wow, those stripes are amazing... I never get stripes that pronounced.

How do you measure the cutting height? I have my tru-cut at 3/4" measured on the concrete (from the cement to the blade cutting the bedknife) but it cuts about the same as the pic with the ball. If I put the mower at 3/8" (lowest setting) it really scalps it down. I must be measuring wrong?


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RE: viewing bermuda types

I don't want to mislead anyone, as stated in post above the photo on that thread is using the morning dew. The photo here is the normal cut view. It is getting more pronounced after each cut. Unfortunately, at some point soon I will have to change directions to avoid making tire tracks.

I dont know how to measure and am stating the reported lowest cutting height (3/8") of the Tru-cut 27" seven blade reel. This could be wrong. One note, I do use the roller which makes a huge difference in preventing scalping. When I first started cutting I was cutting on the fourth notch. After awhile the grass just started growing horizontal instead of vertical and I lowered the cut to the lowest setting. I will soon start cutting at the second notch because I believe it will provide more pronounced stripes. I dont know but will soon see.


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RE: viewing bermuda types

Tweed, GA has different climates as you probably know, so you can't recommend Bermuda for the entire state.

I believe that based on temperatures and rainfall patterns, you can grow Bermuda from Atlanta and South. North of Atlanta should be cool season grasses like Fescue and Bluegrass if irrigation is present or if normal rain patterns return.

As pretty as that Bermuda looks on that picture, it will be wrong to recommend it for Buckhead, Alpharetta, Buford, Marietta, and North.

In GA there's a Transition zone within the Transition zone in the US, and that is From Atlanta down to Macon. South of Macon towards Tifton warm season grasses dominate the landscape, north of Alpharetta towards the GA mountains and cool season grasses are the norm.

As far as warm season grasses in Raleigh, yes, "some" of the new subdivisions are using Bermuda, that's accurate, "some" most still Fescue/Bluegrass. And a lot of those new subdivisions are usually located in Apex, Holly Springs, Fuquay Varina, and South of that towards Fayetteville where more warm season grasses are used.

To put this into perspective, in my subdivision of 262 homes, the breakdown as far as the use of cool season and warm season grasses is as follow:

Centipede = 1 house
Buffalograss = 1 house
Bermudagrass = 2 Houses
Zoysiagrass = 6 houses (3 sodded last year)
Bluegrass = 3 houses
Fescue/Bluegrass = 249 houses

BTW, my neighborhood broke construction in 1996 and finished in 2001. So it's not like the old houses (subdivisions) in Raleigh full of mature trees.

Two new neighborhoods down the street from me, one built in 2006 and the other one in 2008 had Fescue/Bluegrass sod installed.

Anyway, that's the pattern and it has been like that many years, and will continue that way I suspect. It's very costly to change from cool to warm season grass because it usually requires the use of sod vs seed, and most homeowners are not willing to pay $3k to 4k to have green for grass for 5 months. Most of the people I've talk to in my neighborwood that converted to warm season grass is because it is what the had back home, and/or drought tolerance. Most homeowners are not willing to water their lawns during droughts, they preffer to put it on autopilot. And when they do and the grass dies, they quickly put the blame on Fescue...

We're 3 weeks into May, so summer is quickly approaching. As of today, most of the cool season turf here is green, lush, and thriving. Summer here is 3 months, June, July, and August. By Labor Day, people start to overseed and fertilize their lawns - it's standard practice.


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RE: viewing bermuda types

Here is mine freshly cut on the 4th lowest setting of a tru-cut 25 with roller. I put the roller on the #1-#3 hole position.

I'm still too lumpy to go lower... maybe after I topdress properly? I also changed directions so it makes it look lumpier. The wheels were starting to make indentations as seen in the last pic. I'm mowing every 2-3 days and still get some light scalpage.


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Jacksnife- that lawn is drop dead gorgeous. There isn't an ounce of difference between yours and mine other than the stripes. I think the stripes might hide the imperfections a little better but they are still there. The flatter areas in my lawn stripe much better than the rougher areas in the back. I still need lots of sand. I am currently buying motor sand from a cement company at $11 dollars a pick-up load. Lots of work but the results are worth it.


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RE: viewing bermuda types

Jacknife where are you?

Anyway since you use a real mower it sounds like you want to go low right? Also sounds like you have some uneven surface preventing you from doing so?

No problem my friend. It will take some work but is easy to fix. You can do it one of two ways.

1. If your yard needs to be aerted, now looks to be a good time as your yard is actively growing. Go ahead and aerate and top dress with a very coarse sand called Shrp Shand, or Builders Sand. Do not use play sand or any fine grain sand. Don't add so much as to completely cover the grass up, leave some leaf material showing. If one app is not enoguh wait a couple of weks until the grass grows up through first app, and do it again until you get where you want to go. Just do not do it with 30 days of your first frost date.

You are basically doing what every golf course does to th eputting greens, make it smooth as silk.

2. Same as above except do not aerate.


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Thanks Trplay! hearing it from the neighbors is one thing... hearing from here, well that's a whole new ballgame :) Actually, if it wasn't for this forum I'd still be clueless!

TW, I'm in Frisco. I just put this sod in last Sept. so I don't think I need to aerate yet(?) For the sand, is masons sand too fine grain? I looked at builders sand at a local yard and it was very coarse... it's the stuff? Can I get started now? should I let the grass grow some first? or should I scalp it down to say 1/2" or so?


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RE: viewing bermuda types

jacknife yes the builders sand at the local yard is exactly what you want. It is very coarse and irregular shape grains. It will not pack down, and will break up the clay.

I am just North of you and everything is really green, so yes get started now. The window is as soon as it is growing agressively in the spring after warm up, and before it slows down late in fall when it cools off. Time to get with it. Just remember not to bury the grass, take it in steps is the depressions are low.

Here is a tip. If you can get a lawn tractor, build you a frame out of 2 x 4 and stretch some chain link fence on the frame and drag it around like a skreet.


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Trplay

Trplay you had me for a while until you put that Fred Flinstone rock of a golf ball (Top Flite). Now I know you are a hacker :>)


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RE: viewing bermuda types

Nice turf Fellas'. Here is some Riviera grown in MD....

[IMG]http://i125.photobucket.com/albums/p75/ex-mpd/yard-4-1.jpg[/IMG]


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New photo

I did photos last year... Lets try again.

Photobucket


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RE: viewing bermuda types

Bermuda does great in georgia... for 3 months of the year!!
It does much better in treeless wastelands though with sandy soil.


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RE: viewing bermuda types

Iforgotitsonevermind you sound like you have a tremendous amount of experience with Bermuda. Which three months do you refer too?


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hey reelfan, that riviera looks awesome!! How tall is that mowed? I see you have a mark on the forth slot from the bottom. For me that's 3/4" and working ok on my lumpy yard.

Do you have to fight seed heads?


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Reelfan don't tell them you are in MD with Bermuda, you are now a target :>)


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"Iforgotitsonevermind you sound like you have a tremendous amount of experience with Bermuda. Which three months do you refer too?"

May, June, July, August, September. Sometimes April and October or parts thereof.

But math was never my strong subject, so I may have miscounted.


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I think perhaps "nevermind" has confused another type of grass with Bermuda. Reelfan that photo is about as good as it gets.


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RE: viewing bermuda types

Thanks for the comments guys. It appears that it will be even thicker this year! I sometimes wonder what all the anti-Bermuda fuss is about when it comes to the attitudes of Iforgot and Auteck. They go on and on about Southern Climates not being right for Bermuda. Like Texas-W stated, I'm all the way up in Northern MD, and have good coverage from April-Late December. Mind-boggling turf from May-October, so I'm not sure why they claim Georgia is too far North for Bermuda. I don't mind the break from mowing during the cold season.
@Jacksknife.... Those marks are for my Rye in the front yard....Cool season and mid summer heights. I cut the Bermuda at 3/8ths. The lowest that Tru-Cut will go, and no, I've never seen any seed production in the Riviera. Thanks for the compliments and don't listen to the Bermuda haters here.


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Rellfanatic said:
Iforgot and Auteck go on and on about Southern Climates not being right for Bermuda. I'm all the way up in Northern MD, and have good coverage from April-Late December. Mind-boggling turf from May-October, so I'm not sure why they claim Georgia is too far North for Bermuda.

This cannot be even remotely true, just ask them :>)


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Rellfanatic

Rellfanatic,

One of the reasons your Bermuda does so well is you made a smart choice with Riveria as it is one of the better cold weather performers.

If you have the inclination and funds you might try over seeding it with Yukon Bermuda this summer. It has even better cold weather performance meaing it will green up sooner and stay greener later in Fall. Just thought I would share that with you.

Or if you really got the funds, get a tractor truck and flatbed trailer, drive south to a farm that sells TifSport Bermuda; it is the king of cold weather performance :>)


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T-Weed and Reelfanatic,

USDA plant hardiness zones in the state of Maryland, range from Zone 5 (same as a some Counties in Western NC)in the extreme western part of the state to 6 and 7 (West and Central NC, Atlanta and North) in the central part, and Zone 8 (SE NC and Central GA and South) around the southern part of the coast, the bay area, and most of metropolitan Baltimore.

Someone MD located in zone 8 will have better results growing Bermuda than someone else in zone 7 further south.

Where are you located? (zip code will work)


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Texas... I wish I had been more aware of Yukon at the time I planted the Riviera. I'm not even sure if it was available to the public then..06'. I just know that there was alot of ranting and raving about the Riviera's green-up and hardiness rates. I planted mine at the exact time that the golf course I work for did. The owner and super did quite abit of research and chose Riviera. We put it into the ground of the five par 3 holes we have and it is doing great. The members love the lie it provides even when dormant compared to the bent/rye fairways we have on most of the course. I just may order a few pounds of Yukon this year as you suggest. It is getting the same hype now that the Riviera was a couple of years ago. I don't think it will be too much longer before they engineer a seeded Bermuda cultivar that will thrive Nationwide. Thanks for educating me on the Tifsport. I was under the assumption that none of the hybrids did well with cold winters.

Auteck... I'm 20886


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Brian,
Bermuda is optimal in the georgia piedmont from mid to late summer but take into account that is the dry season. No irrigation and no rain. That will be a problem if you like your grass green. Compacted clay soil is less than ideal for bermuda and our wooded homesites here thin out bermuda by the end of summer. All new homes are required to have trees put in so bermuda is not thinking long term here. But that's not what the OP wanted to know. They asked what bermuda they can have look nice at 2". (lol) At least they're in the right climate for it.


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"nevermind" do you just make this stuff up or what. Annual rainfall during those periods (mid summer) and most others in this area is over 10 inches. This easily handles the one inch a week standard most often preached. Anyone who plays baseball (notice the trplay handle), will tell you Bermuda will cover that compacted clay infield in a heart beat if not monitored. Are you sure you're not confusing Bermuda with perhaps annual rye or something?


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Reelfanatic, Riviera was a good choice at the time and at that time had the best cold performance of what was commercially available. Yukon was around then but in very limited quantities. If you would like to try it I know of a very good source and if you PM me I will share privately. If you do it will not overtake the Riviera in a season, just complement it. Whichever one dominates will win the battle eventually which is the idea behind a blend. It would look just fine.

As for the hybrids vs seeded types in cold performance, hybrids win the contest in most cases and TifsSport is the champ. This will give you an idea NTEP Only problem is there is no test results for your area. About as close as you are going to get is Illinois.

But hey Riviera is good, so dont sweet it, you did good.


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reelfanatic, you're in zone 7 just like Atlanta and Raleigh. Your climate zone favors Tall Fescue or Kentucky Bluegrass or both much better than any bermuda grass (seed or hybrid) If you are having success growing bermuda and you are happy with it, then continue building on that. I see that you are anything but the average homeowner with that short bermuda and that reel mower in MD...


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@Auteck... I know I'm not in the optimal growing region by any stretch, but I like letting folks know it's possible if you don't mind dormancy in the winters.

@Texas.... I'm up for putting some Yukon in there. Thanks for the offer, I'll pm you in June. Couple of questions for you. Which overseeding procedure do you suggest?

1) Aerate, Broadcast, Topdress.
2) Broadcast, work in past the canopy, Topdress.
3) Broadcast and just work in
4) Walk behind slit seeder.

Or something totally different?


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Reelfanatic,

Well my answer may scare you a bit, but a modified number 1 would be closest to my optimum answer.

Depending on your soil condition I would skip the aerating part, but if you did aerate you would need to top-dress to fill the holes to prevent seed from going into them. As you know Bermuda seed is very fine like sand and needs to be barely buried if even at all. More like broadcast on loose soil and rolled in.

But here is proven method. Scalp the yard down as low as possible, bag all the debris. Take a power rakes to open up the soil and remove any thatch. Again bag and clean up the debris. Then top-dress, starter fertilizer, broadcast, roll, then apply heat and water.

Now with that said number 2 and 3 would work, just not quite as good germination. #4 would not work b/c it plants the seed too deep.


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RE: viewing bermuda types

post mortem on the combat extreme ..it dried up like straw in the JAX Fl. heat and sun. weve had great rain though..so its not water. Gotta agree with Weed :
I bashed my LaPrima XD seeding from last year as a dud. I was wrong the drenching rains this year has brought that stuff in full strenght...just took a year to do it and my hydration system alone with no help from mom-nat just didnt cut it. I over-seed my LaPrima into SA in the front and into Centipede in the backyard...they work as a GREAT team. (Oh Weed LaPrima XD is a combo of LaPaloma and P-77)


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RE: viewing bermuda types

I LOVE BERMUDA!!

FESCUE=WEEDS


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RE: viewing bermuda types

Wow, since I posted this I have changed my username to botanicalbill and put in a empire zoysia turf lawn. Its been in for 3 weeks and is well rooted. I mowed a few spots to about an inch. It looks great.

Thanks for all the help from everyone.

Botanicalbill/bill_ftmyers_fl, one in the same.

-Bill


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