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Can't find high nitrogen fertilizer locally

Posted by pbguy420 none (My Page) on
Thu, Jul 24, 14 at 9:38

I'm in coastal NC and can't find high nitrogen fertilizers locally. I've tried tractor supply and the the two big box stores, and can't find anything else.

I did find some 46-0-0 on eBay but it doesn't clarify fast or slow release and I'm weary about posting a link because that makes some commercial forum moderators unhappy ... Will this stuff work?

If not I need somewhere online as I don't plan on driving too far every time I need the stuff. Thanks guys (bermuda lawn btw)


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Can't find high nitrogen fertilizer locally

More than likely it is fast release. I have 46-0-0 Lesco fertilizer and it is fast release. I used it regularly last year but I only used it once this year. I would recommend something else if you could find it.

How big is your yard? My yard is about 4500 sq.ft and the 29-0-3 I am using will last all of this year and most of next year. I too have Bermuda and I live in NC as well (Raleigh area). You should be able to get a high nitrogen fertilizer(Scott's??) from any hardware store. If your yard isn't big to the point you'll need multiple bags a season, pick up some Lesco whenever you're near a John Deere landscapes.


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RE: Can't find high nitrogen fertilizer locally

Like Shem, I tend to use 29-0-3.

A lot of big box stores don't carry pure urea at 46-0-0 because the possibility of burning the lawn with a very slight mistake is very, very high. They carry stuff around half that rating as 4 pounds per thousand is easier to handle than 2 pounds (and a bit) per thousand.

It's fine stuff, you just use a little more.

If you really want pure urea (and you might if you have a really large lawn), call around and ask if they carry urea fertilizer and verify the nitrogen amount. Some suggestions would be Lesco and any smaller specialty garden stores in your area--big box stores generally won't carry it and won't order it for you.


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RE: Can't find high nitrogen fertilizer locally

I've got 13,000 sq ft, and the cheapest stuff is best for me obviously... Also I have spotty centipede that was overseeded with bermuda. I've read centipede doesn't like lots of fertilizer. So my thought was give the bermuda as much fertilizer as it will take to help it overtake the centipede faster...


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RE: Can't find high nitrogen fertilizer locally

Do a Yellow Pages search for "Seed and Feed" in your zip and start calling and asking for 46-0-0 urea and prices, you'll find something. I did.


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RE: Can't find high nitrogen fertilizer locally

I've got 13,000 sq ft, and the cheapest stuff is best for me obviously... Also I have spotty centipede that was overseeded with bermuda. I've read centipede doesn't like lots of fertilizer. So my thought was give the bermuda as much fertilizer as it will take to help it overtake the centipede faster...


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RE: Can't find high nitrogen fertilizer locally

I pay $0.77 per pound of N with 46-0-0 from a Feed and Seed. You aren't going to find N any cheaper than that.


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RE: Can't find high nitrogen fertilizer locally

Is the Bermuda a common or hybrid? I ask because density is important when selecting the fertilizer. A close mown hybrid is way too tight for a Urea prill. However, if your mowing above an inch, it likely won't make much difference. I personally would avoid Urea ( 46-0-0 ). It does little but cause excessive growth, bump the color a bit, and maybe provide you 4-6 weeks of performance. And as noted above, it also has high burn potential if misapplied. And with a warm day, you may volatilize a third of it away before you get the water on. Another less expensive option is 21-0-0 if available. A cheap quick 3-4 weeks of color and growth. Typically called ammonium sulfate. I'd suggest going to a professional turf and landscape outlet. JDL, etc will generally carry a wide range of fertilizers for all types of budgets. Take a look at the slow release nitrogens (SRN), especially SCU's (sulfur coated urea ) and the PCU's (polymer coated urea). Generally, you'll find them in mixtures ( both fast and slow release N ) which provide the quick greenup and the long, slow release. When you look around, ask for products containing at least 40% SRN. Anything less really isn't worth the investment. There are PCU blends out there that will comfortably provide 12-16 weeks of moderate growth and attractive turf. Yes, they're more expensive, but typically pound for pound, and week for week, ( plus your labor and clippings! ), they're worth the money.


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