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Yukon Bermuda Assistance

Posted by djw_nc z7 NC (My Page) on
Thu, Jul 10, 08 at 15:27

When we moved in to a newly built house five years ago, we were given fescue but I supplemented with bluegrass. I snuck a small circle of Yukon Bermuda (about a foot in diameter) to see what it would do and I would now like to spread it out. I sprayed round-up around the perimeter of the Yukon and used a bulb planter to transplant some plugs into other areas of the yard, but the grass doesn't seem to spread even into barren areas (and, of course, the seed isn't available this year).

My question is probably one you never thought you'd hear: How can I encourage my bermudagrass to spread?


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Yukon Bermuda Assistance

Are you feeding it?


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RE: Yukon Bermuda Assistance

Bermuda likes monthly of slow release nitrogen at 1 lbs per 1000 sqft and weekly watering will help.


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RE: Yukon Bermuda Assistance

Where in NC are you located? Your weather might not be what bermuda likes in order to thrive and spread...


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RE: Yukon Bermuda Assistance

I'm in Durham. We've been upper 80's-90's, not too many 100's yet.

I fed it some miracle grow, increasing monthly until I burned some of the plugs (they're coming back now, slowly, so it is bermuda grass).

Is there any supplemental nutrient that encourages spread?


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RE: Yukon Bermuda Assistance

Quit using MG, use a slow release urea.


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RE: Yukon Bermuda Assistance

TW is talking about LESCO brand fertilizer specifically 39-0-0 that he always suggested. If you can find a local LESCO store, get one (google it). It's enough to last you all growing season with 19.5 lbs of nitrogen meaning 19,500 sqft of coverage in 50lbs bag at the rate of 1lbs per 1000 sqft. If there's no local LESCO store, maybe Home Depot will care LESCO fertilizer. Over here, HD stores carry them but not 39-0-0. Usually it's 15-5-10 and 24-0-11 (or similar formulation) that you should get if you can't get 39-0-0.


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RE: Yukon Bermuda Assistance

Durham's climate is not the most conducive to Bermuda; Fescue is. If you don't like Fescue, then try Bluegrass or Fine Fescue in shady areas. Bermuda performs in Central NC during the months of June, July, and August. And, if we get warm temperatures in September like we it happened last year, then you'll get that and that's it; back to brown again.

I've seen some nice bluegrass lawns as well as Fescue lawns in Durham, in fact, the turfgrass grown at South Point Mall is a mix of KBG and Fescue. It looks really good right now, even during the hottest month.


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RE: Yukon Bermuda Assistance

auteck,

I'm not sure you'll consider this agreement, but my back yard is great for KBG, but my front yard seems to be too sunny for too many hours during the day, especially with the watering restrictions still in effect, I can expect "amber waves of grain" for a large part of the summer.

I have a few years experience with the small patch of Yukon Bermuda and it does green up early and go dormant late, I got almost 11 months of fairly dark green last year, in a small patch to the side of the house.

Looking at my neighbors yards, I can watch the "wild type" bermuda take over their lawns year after year. (It is possible that we are just down-wind from the golf course next door which is mostly bermuda grass and getting contamination from their crop. Buteven a significant period of winter dormancy wouldn't be out of place.)


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RE: Yukon Bermuda Assistance

djw nc,

If you like the bermudagrass, go for it, but note that is not the best adapted grass in your area. I personally don't mind the brown period so much if, and only if, during the green period that grass will be fine bladed, dark green, very dense, and without invanding flower beds too much. That warm season grass does not exist today, not for us homeowners.

As far as your 11 month green bermuda lawn in Central NC, you were most likely looking at a different grass - Texas weed can confirm that. There's no bermuda or warm season grass that can stay green in Central NC for 11 months out of the year. I don't even think that's possible in Texas or northen Florida where it's warmer longer than here. If that was the case, whatever bermudagrass is growing in your yard will be the next ticket to financial freedom.

Don't take this personal, I've been around turfgrass for many years now, I have even volunteer at the local golf course where I played; and even with golf course maintanance I have never seed a bermudagrass be fully green in Central NC for more than 4 months.

Most people in Central NC who make the change from Fescue to warm season grass is because they don't want to water during the summer or ever.

My 100% Kentucky Bluegrass lawn is 100% green today despite the heat that most people claim kills fescue. I have only watered my lawn 3 times this year, and it was back in early June.

Here's a picture of my dark green Kentucky Bluegrass lawn next my neighbor's Zoysia:

I think it shows very well...


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RE: Yukon Bermuda Assistance

auteck,

How established is your lawn? How much rain have you gotten from mother nature in the past 2 months? What's the temperature been like for the last month there? I'm just curious about these variables as your lawn looks really good given that you said it's hot there. I've got a TTTF lawn that I'm trying to keep that green, but there are a lot of "straw" looking blades that have died since it started getting hot. I did not water but maybe twice during spring this year, and my grass looked awesome. Now that it's starting to get hot, it's starting to suffer. Mind you, it's just barely 1 year old though.


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RE: Yukon Bermuda Assistance

I am not too surprized that Yukon is green there for 11-months as it is the most cold and frost tolerant of the Bermuda grasses. Given the mild winters of the last two years I don't have a problem believing that. Yukon was developed for Northern OK climate by OSU out of Stilwater OK.

Getting a little late but I would suggest you spring from the patch you have now. Simply rake/rip up the runners and plant in loosened soil. Keep it watered and fertilized and it should take off.


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RE: Yukon Bermuda Assistance

skizot,

"How established is your lawn?"

My lawn is in its 3rd summer, but there's also new grass in there from 2007 Fall renovation.

"How much rain have you gotten from mother nature in the past 2 months?"

A lot! Mother nature has been very kind to us lately. However, most areas in Central NC are still running a deficit as far as average yearly rainfall.

"What's the temperature been like for the last month there?"

Look in here and you'll find the climate data (ie temperatures, rainfall) for the entire month of June in Cary, NC.

http://www.weather.com/outlook/travel/businesstraveler/monthly/USNC0107?month=-1

I also fertilize during the summer, it helps the grass, but only if constant moisture if provided.

Here is a link that might be useful: Temperatures for this month in Cary, NC


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RE: Yukon Bermuda Assistance dormancy

Texas weed, no go. There's no bermudagrass that will stay green with these temperatures, not in this planet:


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RE: Yukon Bermuda Assistance

Yea Jan is probable when his grass went dormant. Your map means nothing, just one day out of the year.


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RE: Yukon Bermuda Assistance

LOL. TW is so funny!


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RE: Yukon Bermuda Assistance

In your dreams, Texas weed. You do so much talk here that you know this and that, yet, I've never seen a single picture of your work...

One thing you keep forgeting is that North Carolina is NOT Texas. Your weather is different than ours, but you always make recommendations to people living in North Carolina and other states as well.

Up until this post, I had some sore of respect for your knowledge in regards to warm season grasses, but after you stated that it does not surprise you that bermuda is green for 11 months in Durham, NC is simply foolish.

If you think you know about cold tolerance of warm season grasses, why haven't you asnwer my post on the other thread about Emerald Zoysia?

You show me a bermuda grass that stays green in Durham for 11 months and I will go to Texas and buy ALL the sod you have in your farm to sell it here in NC because it is going to stay green for 11 months.

If that was the case, Yukon bermudagrass will be the grass of choice here in Central NC; it is NOT. Fescue, a cool season grass, is.

BTW, Fescue lawns go dormant here for more than a month if you didn't know.


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RE: Yukon Bermuda Assistance

LOL. A rant coming from a guy who thinks we can grow PRG in Dallas in the summer! Whatever...


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RE: Yukon Bermuda Assistance

lou, show me a thread where I SAID PRG can grow in Dallas long term...

PRG grows here in NC, that's what I have said multiple times because it does.


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RE: Yukon Bermuda Assistance

I have a few years experience with the small patch of Yukon Bermuda and it does green up early and go dormant late, I got almost 11 months of fairly dark green last year, in a small patch to the side of the house.

So you just called the OP a liar. That is OK by me. All I said is I am not surprised with the mild winter the area has had latley. Some how you turned that around that I said it is normal. Get a grip on yourself, you are embarrasing yourself.

I don't have to answer your questions. It's not my job to teach you fact from your imagination.


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So You Want a PIC

Sou you want a PIC. It has been posted her before. 600 acres of 419 in early March at my sod farm of this year. Looks green to me.
Photobucket


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RE: Yukon Bermuda Assistance

"So you just called the OP a liar. That is OK by me."

Word twister, I said to the OP that maybe he was looking at a different grass that was green for nearly 11 months. That statement can easely be applied to the picture I posted with the Fescue lawn as you can see.

"All I said is I am not surprised with the mild winter the area has had latley. Some how you turned that around that I said it is normal. Get a grip on yourself, you are embarrasing yourself."

Don't be a fool, you know exactly what I meant. Mild winters in the area for NC stardards and 30 years of weather record, not for warm season grasses like bermuda which are native to Tropical areas of the world.

Tropical=

1. pertaining to, characteristic of, occurring in, or inhabiting the tropics, esp. the humid tropics: tropical flowers.
2. very hot and humid: a tropical climate.
3. designed for use in the tropics or in very hot weather (often used in combination): tropical-weight woolens.
4. of or pertaining to either or both of the astronomical tropics.
5. pertaining to, characterized by, or of the nature of a trope or tropes; metaphorical.
noun 6. tropicals, lightweight clothing, suitable for warm, esp. summer weather.

As one of the pictures clearly shows that even with mild winters in the past few years, temperatures dropped to the teens without problem and no snow cover to blanket the grass at night.

You said "I'm not surprised with the mild winters the area has had lately" which tells me you concur with the OP. That in fact you believe that Yukon bermudagrass could stay green for nearly 11 months in Durham, NC. If that was the case NC State Univ. will be all over it, sod farms will be all over it, homeowners will be all over it, golf courses will be all over it, etc... There's no warm season grass that does better adapted than Fescue in the Transition zone, hense it dominates the landscape.

So up until now, I held you in a higher standard, so agreeing with the OP gives you no credibility because you should know better. Again, the OP could have easely mistaken Yukon for fescue or even bluegrass which he said he supplemented with.

"I don't have to answer your questions. It's not my job to teach you fact from your imagination."

I take that as you really don't have an answer and can't come up with one and therefore, blah, blah, blah...

All forum members here know that this is a forum where people share knowledge to help others with their questions or concerns, so member participation is expected and not forced. You post here because you want to, and while is not my job to teach you some guidelines and forum common sense, I'm more than happy to as long as you and other forum members can benefit from it.


"Sou you want a PIC. It has been posted her before. 600 acres of 419 in early March at my sod farm of this year. Looks green to me."

No, I wasn't requesting a picture, I simply stated that I have never seen pictures from your work. Some times it's nice to see pictures that backup your hyperbolical statements; that's all.

By the way, my PRG looks better right now (July 17, 2008) than your 419 in March, you say all the time PRG dies in NC; sure...


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RE: Yukon Bermuda Assistance

Here are the pics of TW's sod farm.....

Here is a link that might be useful: TW's Sod Farm


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RE: Yukon Bermuda Assistance

Autek you moron, every golf course around Raleigh, heck all NC golf courses has Bermuda fairways/tees bent grass greens, and even some have Bermuda greens. I know I have a daughter in Raleigh who works at RTP, and I visit once a year and an avid golfer.

Sod farms don't do Yukon, it is a common variety from seed developed in Northwest Oklahoma for colder climates, where they measure snow in feet, not inches. Last time I was in Raleigh when it snowed 1/2 inch the whole city closed down and went into massive panic. So don't go blowing smoke how cold it gets there, I am not buying it.

Fescue and the cool season grasses are popular there for one main reason, all the darn trees. Heck you cannot find one thing in the area for all the trees blocking your vision. I hate the road system there, not one single straight road in the area. They just followed old deer and wagon trails though the forest.

When a poster wants to grow a specific variety I try to help them out, not convince them otherwise. Bermuda and Zoysia grow just fine in your area providing they get sunlight. All anyone has to do to find out what grows in any region is look at the local universities and product list of the sod farms.

You seem to forget I am a sod farmer. We have networks and communicate through all 50 states. I know sod farmers in all the lower 48 and have met a lot of them in person via conventions and work shops. So I don't have to live in a particular state to know what can be grown there. Raleigh is the same USDA zone I am in which tells me right away what will work and will not. Sure the cool season grasses work there and are favored, but that is only because of the milder Summers and shade issue with all the trees.

You are not fooling me or anyone else, so can it youngster.


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RE: Yukon Bermuda Assistance

Autek, I understand your belief that I was looking at the wrong type of grass, that concern gave me pause before posting here; but, I believe I am capable of identifying the grasses in my yard:

Fescue, tall, large blade no spreading. I don't like it because it doesn't spread and the day-long sun I get in the front yard burns it to a crisp. I replace the worst patch with mulch and a garden, but while the back yard looked picture perfect, the front yard would wither and thin. I did notice that the lawn you are proud of in your picture is shaded during daylight hours, The lot in which my house was built was clear-cut at building (as were the surrounding lots to raise the one across the street and raise ours, leveling out the ground somewhat and giving us some great clay soil to dig through).

KBG, thin blade with a boat like tip to catch the morning dew. Great stuff, I like it: it spreads and thickens, with fertilizer and water it is the ideal grass, but does go dormant during the summer in my front yard, when I'd like to enjoy walking barefoot in the grass. I even find the inflorescence scintillating (chemist joke, sorry). If I thought there was an end to the drought/development cycle in Durham that would make irrigation easier I would probably stick with it. I used run of the mill kenblue, specifically because of it's reputation (via NTEP) to return after dormancy.

Bermuda, either upright or horizontal, it looks like runners (yea, yea, yea: stolon) or little trees (leaves as though they emerge from a stem) and chicken feet seed heads. The patch of Yukon actually put up a few seed heads, but not as many as the feral bermuda that is taking over the neighborhood. I believe I have a patch of it in the dog zone, but the neighbors have runners measured in feet crossing the sidewalk and reaching out for passing cars. During the winter, it all does go dormant (mine was dormant through parts of December and January, including the 1/4/08 that you posted, but greened up during a warm spell later that January. I don't expect to get 11 months every year, but I'll take it when I can get it. Walking the dog around the neighborhood, I am amused at the disparate times of green-up among the bermuda grasses. The first house in the neighborhood has a patch that didn't green up until May, but the FOT patch across the road was green in early spring with the daffodils. (It literally fell off the truck of a landscaping truck delivering sod and was about the size of a patch he had in a formerly fescue lawn. In 10 years, under a fescue regime, it took over several hundred square feet, this is what I was hoping for.)

I now believe that the Yukon is just not as aggressive a spreader as the standard bermuda, if you've been reading this far, I'd strongly suggest you try it, it's a much improved bermuda in terms of density, color and (lack of) seed production, at the expense of aggressive spread -- which someday I'll probably laud, but I can't say that day is today. I've been keeping a watch on seed production, and two years out of the five (-ish) that I've been watching they have not been able to market the seed, which may prevent it's adoption by landscapers accustomed to overseeding fescue (year after year after year...). If I want a larger patch of Yukon, it'll probably require waiting until seeding is a possibility.

I was judging Kenblue KBG and K31 TTTF against the improved Yukon bermuda, which may be an unfair comparison, but in my front yard with hour after hour of mid-day sun, the bermuda is green when I want it the most, and more amenable to a lower watering regime which is not dependent on the whims of the local water management department (http://www.ci.durham.nc.us/departments/wm/water_update.cfm) or captured parking lot runoff as is my understanding at Southpoint. (I can't find a like to the support my understanding of Southpoint's water managemtent, but if bermuda doesn't grow in the triangle, why is C.A.R.Y. starting a "Warm Season Grass Incentive for New Development" (http://www.carynews.com/front/story/9392.html) given the fairway quality requirements seemingly written into the bedrock of that fair community?


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RE: Yukon Bermuda Assistance

tak2w, thanks for pointing me to that thread, I think I will listen to the lone star turf wrangler, even though it may end up requiring patience.

It reminds me that in the interest of full disclosure, I grew up on St. Augustine in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. The speed of the spread of the SA was measured in lost pets, the only thing that would hold it back was the Kudzu. I seem to remember that there is a NCSU SA (wolfpack?) that may be cold tolerant enough for up here, but now the seed heads remind me too much of the the DOT replants with and the blades are larger than I'd like.


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RE: Yukon Bermuda Assistance

TW, I don't mean to pry, but I must. The picture you posted above from "this march" is the EXACT same picture in the link that tak2w posted above.....from last September.

Look, I have lived in NC all my life and grew up 20 miles from Durham and Raleigh. Bermuda will do fine in the summer, but it will not stay green for 11 months. Not Yukon, 419 or anything. Heck, I live south of Wilmington and mine does dormant in late October/early September. The climate where you are is completely different than that here.


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RE: Yukon Bermuda Assistance

texas_weed, I've been following this thread and watching the debate going back and forth. You probably shouldn't lie about when your photos were taken. You say that is a picture of your sod farm in March. Normally, it wouldn't really matter that that's not the case, but it definitely does given your argument. In case you didn't know, when you take pictures with a digital camera, there's a small section of the file that contains EXIF data, which is meta-data about the picture. Here's the EXIF data for your photo:

Exif Sub IFD

* Exposure Time (1 / Shutter Speed) = 1/320 second = 0.00313 second
* Lens F-Number/F-Stop = 32/10 = F3.2
* ISO Speed Ratings = 80
* Exif Version = 0220
* Original Date/Time = 2007:09:05 20:45:01
* Digitization Date/Time = 2007:09:05 20:45:01
* Components Configuration = 0x01,0x02,0x03,0x00 / YCbCr
* Compressed Bits per Pixel = 5/1 = 5
* Shutter Speed Value (APEX) = 266/32
Shutter Speed (Exposure Time) = 1/317.92 second
* Aperture Value (APEX) = 107/32
Aperture = F3.19
* Exposure Bias (EV) = 0/3 = 0
* Max Aperture Value (APEX) = 107/32 = 3.34
Max Aperture = F3.19
* Metering Mode = pattern / multi-segment (5)
* Flash = Flash did not fire, compulsory flash mode
* Focal Length = 7889/1000 mm = 7.89 mm
* FlashPix Version = 0100
* Colour Space = sRGB (1)
* Image Width = 640 pixels
* Image Height = 480 pixels
* Focal Plane X-Resolution = 640000/225 = 2844.44
* Focal Plane Y-Resolution = 480000/169 = 2840.24
* Focal Plane X/Y-Resolution Unit = inch (2)
* Image Sensing Method = one-chip color area sensor (2)
* Image Source = digital still camera (DSC)
* Custom Rendered = normal process (0)
* Exposure Mode = auto exposure (0)
* White Balance = auto (0)
* Digital Zoom Ratio = 3072/3072 = 1
* Scene Capture Type = landscape (1)

Exif IFD0

* Camera Make = Canon
* Camera Model = Canon PowerShot A560
* Picture Orientation = normal (1)
* X-Resolution = 180/1 = 180
* Y-Resolution = 180/1 = 180
* X/Y-Resolution Unit = inch (2)
* Last Modified Date/Time = 2007:09:05 20:45:01
* Y/Cb/Cr Positioning (Subsampling) = centered / center of pixel array (1)


So, the date/time meta-data shows that you took the picture at 20:45 on 09/05/2007, not March as you're claiming.


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RE: Yukon Bermuda Assistance

Heelsfan, I never said Yukon or Bermuda would stay green for 11 months in the RTP area. At least I did not intend that. I said I was not surprised if it did with a mild winter in the area. Here in TX we can have an 11 month season once every few years like 2006. In RTP area I would say the norm is 5 to 6 months for the hybrids and maybe a bit longer for the improved seeded varieties like Yukon on average. OK?

As for the pix age, my bad. It was posted last September. I get forgetful in my old age. The point is we greened up a little late this year in March only to have 16 inches of snow dumped on it the week of March 17 or thereabouts. I made a post about it if you want to look it up. Normally we go dormant around T-Day or first week in December, and start greening up late Feb. So I apologize for any inaccuracy in my statement, I didnt mean to mislead anyone.

Anyway the whole point of this thread is the OP wants to grow Yukon, not Fescue or Rye. I say go for it if that is what you want, and I will try to help to that end.


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RE: Yukon Bermuda Assistance

"Autek you moron, every golf course around Raleigh, heck all NC golf courses has Bermuda fairways/tees bent grass greens, and even some have Bermuda greens. I know I have a daughter in Raleigh who works at RTP, and I visit once a year and an avid golfer."

Now down to personal insults... That shows what a low class citizen you are. Just because you visit RTP it doesn't translate into "heck all NC golf courses has Bermuda fairways/tees bent grass greens, and even some have Bermuda greens."

You couldn't be more wrong. The western part of the state, zone 6 with VERY MILD summers use mostly Rye and Bluegrass. I know, I own a cabin there and play golf there as well and I've yet to see a bermuda fairway or tees even. The average high temeperature in the month of July (the hottes month) is only 76 degrees F with lows in the 50
s at night. No bermuda will ever thrive with those temperatures, but bluegrass and rye will; easely.

You need to understand that NC is NOT Texas, and what grows in Texas does NOT translate it will grow in NC. Get that through your head if you can...


"Sod farms don't do Yukon, it is a common variety from seed developed in Northwest Oklahoma for colder climates, where they measure snow in feet, not inches. Last time I was in Raleigh when it snowed 1/2 inch the whole city closed down and went into massive panic. So don't go blowing smoke how cold it gets there, I am not buying it."

You're wrong here again. Sod farmers are going to grow what customers want (demand) wether seed or hybrid, IF is stays green for 11 months in Raleigh, sod farmers will grow bermuda from seed. Homeowners can care less if is seeded or hybrid, they want green, golf courses want green, so no, I'm not buying your hybrid story - maybe you can sell it in Texas, not here in NC.

As far as Yukon being for Oklahoma and they measure snow in feet not inches, even better for grasses to have a thick coat of snow to protect them against cold temperatures. We don't have consistant snow here to protect any grass during the winter months, which actually makes it worst if you didn't know.

Last time it snowed here in Raleigh was February 12, 2008. That's this year, not 10 or 20 years ago like you are playing down. I've live here 7 year and I have seen snow fall here every single year without fail. Schools might shot down because of safety reasons, but business operate as usual. I've never missed a day of work because of 1/2 of snow, maybe in Texas. We also get ICE wich is far worst than snow when it comes to driving, and you can't plow that.

"Fescue and the cool season grasses are popular there for one main reason, all the darn trees. Heck you cannot find one thing in the area for all the trees blocking your vision. I hate the road system there, not one single straight road in the area. They just followed old deer and wagon trails though the forest."

For me is perfect, just like Germany or many other beautiful roads found in many European countries. I can't stant dessert-like places with little to no flora, it's very deppresing to say the least.

Fescue is the best adapted grass in Raleigh, extensive research will prove that, hense its domination. Trees, rainfall, temperatures, disease, etc, are part of what defines Raleigh's weather, and no other grass can handle those obstacles as well as fescue. Like it or not, fescue is king here in Raleigh.

"When a poster wants to grow a specific variety I try to help them out, not convince them otherwise. Bermuda and Zoysia grow just fine in your area providing they get sunlight. All anyone has to do to find out what grows in any region is look at the local universities and product list of the sod farms."

And if you do that, you will find that Fescue is what grows in this area and is the best adapted grass, not Zoysia or Bermuda. Zoysia and Bermuda, both suffer winter damage here every year, and if you really wanted to help some one, you would tell them othwerwise. But you seem to forget that NC is not Texas, and what grows in Texas does not necessarely grow here in NC. I hope you get this one day...

"You seem to forget I am a sod farmer. We have networks and communicate through all 50 states. I know sod farmers in all the lower 48 and have met a lot of them in person via conventions and work shops. So I don't have to live in a particular state to know what can be grown there. Raleigh is the same USDA zone I am in which tells me right away what will work and will not. Sure the cool season grasses work there and are favored, but that is only because of the milder Summers and shade issue with all the trees."

You making a fool of yourself once again. You said, "sure the cool season grasses work ther and are favored, but that is only because of the milder summer and shade issue with all the trees."

Of course, what else. It's part of the climate here in NC. This is a very lush state where flora grows very well. It's one of the characteristics that defines NC's weather, therefore it must be taken to account.

It's like saying, sure the warm season grasses work there and are favorate, but that is only because hot summers and no shade issues with NO trees. Dah, of course!!. It's no fluke that warm season grasses dominate the landscape in the deep south...

"You are not fooling me or anyone else, so can it youngster."

I think you better chose your words more wisely and read your posts before posting them so you don't end up looking like a fool once again and now a lier!!!

Well done.

Auteck


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RE: Yukon Bermuda Assistance

WOW Autek...you make it your business to moderate TW. I think that you two would help more folk if you focus on commonalities. Remember we are here to help each other with lawns.
I gotta say your yard looked GOOD but it seems that you have an axe to grind on anyone that favors Bermuda as you know I got a "Mutt yard" SA inter-seeded with LaPrima XD Bermuda and Centipede in the back inter-seeded with the same bermuda. I love how the Bermuda fills in the gaps in the SUPER-SENSITIVE SA. Im sick of babysitting SA the bermuda is green,soft,resilient and pretty(to me) but on its own Im not the type of guy to cut 2xs per week so Bermuda looks "shallow" all alone because I let it grow to 3 inches.
So Im no expert like you and Weed but I just think that more can be done to help folk with "thier" needs.
Ok..Weed does seem to SLIGHTLY lean Bermuda folk to the sod stuff moreso than the seeded stuff otherwise he's helpful to me.


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RE: Yukon Bermuda Assistance

Why are these old threads being dragged up?


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RE: Yukon Bermuda Assistance

  • Posted by jimtnc 7b Raleigh tttf (My Page) on
    Mon, Jul 20, 09 at 8:14

Beats me. Must not be enough current stuff to read.


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