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awesome flower/dangerous plant

Posted by pcput 8a (My Page) on
Wed, Apr 23, 14 at 0:27

We bought a house in FL and along with it comes new plants that we can't ID. This one has a small white bloom with a strong smell of, I guess, gardenia. The plant has some deadly looks thorns. I cut them off this cutting to be able to handle it and see if it will root. It had a couple of about 2" ones and the closer to the top of the cutting small 1/2" ones in pairs and smaller ones farther up. Very stiff and waxy leaves also. Anyone know what it is?

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Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: awesome flower/dangerous plant

Gardenia.


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RE: awesome flower/dangerous plant

I'm thinking Jasmine.


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RE: awesome flower/dangerous plant

I think you are right,Whitelacey,still very early in morning over here so still not fully awake!


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RE: awesome flower/dangerous plant

You might find it's Carissa macrocarpa (I don't know any gardenia or jasmine with thorns but this plant certainly has them). Common name "Natal Plum" (has a fruit-like seed pod). The flowers are highly perfumed.

Here is a link that might be useful: link


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RE: awesome flower/dangerous plant

I have to second the Carissa. The thorns had me puzzled as to the Jasmine. We don't have Carissa in the Midwest so I am not familiar with it.

Thedecoguy.
Are you in SW England? Beautiful country and even more beautiful gardens.

Linda


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RE: awesome flower/dangerous plant

I have one growing (sub-tropical Australia) - only some parts are thorny on mine. It seems to layer very easily if you want to try to reproduce the plant that way. - just peg down a couple of lower branches and possibly nick underneath. I think it might be a suitable hedge or topiary sort of thing, kept trimmed. Lovely perfume.


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RE: awesome flower/dangerous plant

i think of gardenia as multi-petaled.. and jasmin as not ... but i dont grow either ...

use the latin names provided.. to search google for 'PROPAGATION of latin name' ...

there are usually specific times of year.. and which 'wood' to use ... and let me suggest.. it is rarely when the plant is blooming ...

or you just wing it.. and it works.. lol ..

ken


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RE: awesome flower/dangerous plant

Carissa macrocarpa "Natal plum" is a shrub native to South Africa, where it is commonly called the Large Num-Num. Gotta love that name. :-)

The fruit is the only part of the plant that is not poisonous.

Here is a link that might be useful: Carissa macrocarpa


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RE: awesome flower/dangerous plant

Thanks everyone for your help. I think Carissa is right on. Everything seems to match. I will watch for the "plums" now. I'll pin some branches to the ground if I want more. That's the easy way to go about it. Thanks again, Peg


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RE: awesome flower/dangerous plant

  • Posted by bboy USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA (My Page) on
    Thu, Apr 24, 14 at 10:03

In your case you will be Peg-ing them to the ground.


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RE: awesome flower/dangerous plant

bboy "LOL" :)


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