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Need to find a replacement from storm damage

Posted by jsischo Illinois (My Page) on
Sun, Jun 22, 14 at 15:08

This is a branch from a small tree in my backyard that was recently damaged by a storm. This plant is currently 8-9 feet tall and roughly 4 feet wide. The branches all stretch upward. This is one of my favorite tree type plants as it has great green color through the spring and summer and then in the middle of July into early fall it produces many small purple/ pink flowers that stay in bloom for weeks. Please help me identify this plant so that I can replace it. If you need more information I can try to provide it. Thank you!


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Need to find a replacement from storm damage

Hibiscus syriacus aka Rose of Sharon. Many colours, singles and doubles, so to replace the one you lost you'd need to see them in flower or find pictures to compare.

On the other hand, they are so tough and so amenable to pruning your old one will probably bounce back in no time.


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RE: Need to find a replacement from storm damage

Do you think it will bounce back? I am worried that because it is split basically in half and all the way to the main trunk that it will be exposed to pests and rot. Any advice based on the pictures?


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RE: Need to find a replacement from storm damage

This is a picture from a previous year and it shows the flower. I was hoping some one could narrow the name and variety for me in the event it does not survive. Thank you for your help!


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RE: Need to find a replacement from storm damage

Without close look it is hard to say how to treat the plant. There are two basic ways.
First one is to tie the split apart branch up to the main stem and cover the joint with wax based paste to protect from water and pests getting in. After that reduce amount of small branches on that branch up to the two times so the remaining ones could get enough water and nutrients from the roots.
Second way is to remove the broken branch and put wax based paste on the damaged area. Such sort of paste can be found in your garden center or shop, just ask assistant about anything that can be applied on damaged or cut areas of trees.
I would do second way, because being tied the broken branch will suffer and finally it can die. The plant can reproduce its krone to normal look within two-three years if the branch completely removed.


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RE: Need to find a replacement from storm damage

Thank you for your helpful advice. I was leaning towards removing the damaged half and trying to seal the cut and hope it will return to a normal shape. Here is to hoping it will survive!


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RE: Need to find a replacement from storm damage

  • Posted by carrieb 7 Philadelphia (My Page) on
    Sun, Jun 22, 14 at 21:24

Rose of Sharon is invasive in many areas in the US (including here in PA.) You may want to check with your local authorities to see if this plant is invasive in your area. I try to eradicate it from all the gardens I tend.


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RE: Need to find a replacement from storm damage

This does not seem to have the traits of being invasive. It only has one main trunk and it does not produce any spreading shoots underground to spread or through seed. It has stayed this general shape for over three years now. Do they bred decorative Rose of Sharron Hibiscus plants that are not invasive?


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RE: Need to find a replacement from storm damage

  • Posted by carrieb 7 Philadelphia (My Page) on
    Sun, Jun 22, 14 at 22:19

Rose of Sharon spreads by dropping seed. I probably pulled several hundred (maybe as many as a thousand, and I'm NOT exaggerating) from a small garden in Philadelphia just yesterday. It really varies by region, so you can google "rose of sharon invasive pennsylvania) or whatever state you happen to be in.

Here is a link that might be useful: USDA information


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RE: Need to find a replacement from storm damage

Thank you all for the information! I think I have a good grasp on what plant I have and how to treat and take care of it. Thanks again!


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RE: Need to find a replacement from storm damage

Hibiscus syriacus 'Amplissimus'

jsischo, I have an old double ROS (also called Althea) that looks exactly like your posted image. The nursery trade refers to it as being red but the blooms are actually a deep pink. I've kept the nursery information for references such as this. :-)

It is tough as nails, responds well to heavy pruning and the bonus is...it's sterile. No seed pods ever! You can take cuttings for propagation purposes...very easy to make new babies.

You asked..."Do they breed decorative Rose of Sharron Hibiscus plants that are not invasive?" Yes they do!

Rosie

Here is a link that might be useful: sterile Hibiscus syriacus

This post was edited by tulsarose on Mon, Jun 23, 14 at 7:08


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RE: Need to find a replacement from storm damage

You could cut away the whole of the split off part and it would still recover. BTW sealants are NOT recommended for wound covering nowadays despite still being sold for that purpose.

Here is a link that might be useful: Wound sealants


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