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frankencorn?

Posted by michael357 5b, KS (My Page) on
Fri, Feb 7, 14 at 22:16

Thought you might be interested in what a friend of mine told me this week.....he is going to be doing some sweetcorn trials with triple stacked GMO seed, that is, BT, Roundup ready and I don't know the 3rd yet. And I thought the big seed outfits were only interested in the agronomic crops. No hoeing weeds and no spraying Bt for borers and earworms, hmmm.


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: frankencorn?

The "3rd" is most likely another BT type for root worms (as opposed to the more well known BT for ear worms).

There's 550,000-600,000 acres of sweet corn planted every year (for fresh + canning market) so it's not exactly a small market compared to many other crops...especially considering how many plants are crowded into an acre.


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RE: frankencorn?

NC: I was kidding about the Frankencorn title to this post. The variety is Obsession II and is put out by Seminis. I put a link to the web site below if you're interested.

It just surprises me a little that Seminis would go to the expense of producing a relatively minor crop seed having been in the research part of veggie production for many years. I'm all for it and wish there was a lot more of producing better varieties of vegetable crops.

BTW, I think Earl May might be selling small amounts of the seed this year to consumers in case you want to make up signs and protest outside one of their stores near you:) Still waiting for a call back from Earl May about them supplying small quantities to the public.

Here is a link that might be useful: Obsession II


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RE: frankencorn?

Wouldn't be surprised if much of the clear wrapped plastic trays of sweet corn in the supermarkets are GMO. I don't know if processed canned and frozen corn is though. It seems that most of the GMOs are likely the newer types that have a lot of supersweets [sh2] in them.

Large vegetable seed houses sell these new types....not so much the retail companies. I heard comments about Obsession II being so good. I wonder what they compare it to.


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RE: frankencorn?

Seminis is owned by Monsanto now.

They started a partial buyout in the mid/late 90s and by the mid-00s they had taken control it.

Their focus is still mainly traditional hybrids, though.


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RE: frankencorn?

90 percent of the corn and soybeans grown in the USA now contain those Genetically Engineered genes so most likely what you buy in the store is genetically engineered.

Here is a link that might be useful: GMO foods


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RE: frankencorn?

Sweet corn (both for canning and fresh) is such a small part of overall corn production in the US. We have about 90-100 million acres of field corn grown, but only 500-600 thousand acres of sweet corn.

A lot of sweet corn is non-GMO, but the GMO segment is growing (especially since 2012).


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RE: frankencorn?

Hey Kimm, the fieldcorn you ( I assume) refer to is fed to livestock, don't know about you but I don't eat any portion of field corn until it has at least passed through an animal's gut. Would you suggest the GMO genes that livestock consume make it into the animal's meat that I am eating?

I'll have to get to your link later, it's chow time.


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RE: frankencorn?

Because of cross pollination those artificially introduced (artificial insemination?) genes have found their way into the sweet corn.


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RE: frankencorn?

michael357, I don't speak for kimmsr and I might not be catching all of the sarcasm, but:

If you are eating processed foods containing corn products, you are eating "field corn." There is not a patchwork of corn out there with one square specifically designated for human and one for animal. Corn is such a commodity that the difference betweeen what is human "food" and animal "feed" is quite cautious at the margins and certainly much of the grain that is fed to animals would be suitable human food - I would eat it - I would not eat it once it has passed through an animal's gut - but to each his own.

I am not as concerned about gmo as I am other things.


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RE: frankencorn?

Cheapheap: I was refering to the corn that is grown for animal rearing and our subsequent consumption of those animals. It would be quite extraordinary for the GMO genes in an animal's feed to get into it's meat that we eat, it seems to me.

Also, not knowing everything, it seems to me there are 2 predominate sorts of corn grown here, sweetcorn for human consumption and field corn for livestock. Young field corn ears are ok to eat taste and texture wise but, I 'd still rather eat sweetcorn. Oops, forgot about Hominy and Pop Corn types. No sarcasm from me in these posts that I'm aware of, surely none intended.


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RE: frankencorn?

I don't think that there would be any gene expression in carbohydrates,. I don't know about proteins. I think any difference caused by Gmos [if any] would be in some form of a chemical rider in the end product.


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