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getting rid of clover in lawn

Posted by LazyGardener z8 OR ,Bverton (My Page) on
Sun, Jul 17, 05 at 15:38

How can I get rid of clover in my lawn. Can vinegar do it ?

-Thanks


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: getting rid of clover in lawn

Vinegar may get rid of the clover, and the grass too, more probably the grass rather than the clover.
If this is White Dutch Clover it is growing where it grows because there is a lack of nitrogen in the soil, WDC is an indictor plant of low N levels. The best, organic, way to control this is to properly care for the lawn, mow high, water regularly so strong, thick, healthy growth is maintained, and feed the lawn properly.
Keep in mind that after about 50 years of trying to poison this out of existance it is again becoming accetable to grow it in the lawn.

Here is a link that might be useful: White Dutch Clover


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RE: getting rid of clover in lawn

I've seeded lots of WDC into my yard. It attracts bees, breaks up the monotony of the green, and when I mow it I have good stuff for the compost heap.


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RE: getting rid of clover in lawn

Clover seed used to be a standard addition to grass seed. Only since the advent of broad-leaved chemical herbicides has clover-free lawns been fashionable, because the clover dies along with the dandelions.


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RE: getting rid of clover in lawn

if you're truely a "lazy gardener" you should be encouraging the clover, as it's growth habit requires much less mowing!
beautiful stuff that attracts pollinators to your garden, adds color and texture to that bland green lawn, and enriches the soil

Bill


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RE: getting rid of clover in lawn

Thanks for the information. I have white clover and it is so dense that grass is almost gone where there is clover. I have just applied vinegar couple of hours ago. It seems like it did some damage but it will take 2 more treatments. I have been lazy allowing it be an eye sore but the weather was also not cooperating for vinegar treatment. Thank God, for vinegar.

I disagree - white clover is a eye sore to me. :)

Earlier in the spring I used weed wacker to control
it. Also dumped tons of coffee grounds to choke it ..etc.


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RE: getting rid of clover in lawn

the weed whacking and coffe prolly encouraged it!
the only way to totally eliminate it is frequent apps of broadleaf chems - it seeds readily, so you'll have lots of seed there, it grows via rhizome kinda runners that sprout a plant at each node where it puts down a root, it has deep roots, and all you're doing w/ the vinegar is temporarily killing the top growth and acidifying your soil, which clover doesn't mind but grass does :) eye sore? bet it'll look beautiful now!! vinegar is a very short term solution to 'weed' problems

Bill


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RE: getting rid of clover in lawn

I just overseeded my lawn with 20 lbs of Dutch White clover seed, so I can quit using fertilizers.


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RE: getting rid of clover in lawn

I use white sugar. It won't get rid of it right away, but by the following year it will be gone.


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RE: getting rid of clover in lawn

Just got an e-mail from a friend which you might enjoy. Hope you see the humour in it. :O) Personally, I like the clover since it's little underground nodules feed the soil.


YARD WORK - AS VIEWED FROM HEAVEN
. (overheard in a conversation between God and St. Francis):
God: Hey, St. Francis, you know all about gardens and nature;

what in the world is going on down there in the U.S.?

What happened to the dandelions, violets, thistles and the stuff
I started eons ago? I had a perfect no-maintenance garden plan.
Those plants grow in any type of soil, withstand drought, and
multiply with abandon. The nectar from the long-lasting blossoms
attract butterflies, honeybees, and flocks of songbirds. I expected
to see a vast garden of color by now. All I see are patches of green.
. .
St. Francis: It's the tribes that settled there, Lord. They are called the Suburbanites.
They started calling your flowers 'weeds' and went to great lengths to kill them and
replace them with grass.
. .
God: Grass? But it is so boring, it's not colorful. It doesn't attract butterflies,
bees or birds, only grubs and sod worms. It's temperamental with temperatures.
Do these Suburbanites really want grass growing there?
. .
St. Francis: Apparently not, Lord. As soon as it has grown a little, they cut it....
sometimes two times a week.
. .
God: They cut it? Do they bale it like hay?
..
. St. Francis: Not exactly, Lord. Most of them rake it up and put it in bags.
. .
God: They bag it? Why? Is it a cash crop? Do they sell it?
. .
St. Francis: No sir, just the opposite. They pay to throw it away.
. .
God: Now let me get this straight...they fertilize it to make it grow and
when it does grow, they cut it off and pay to throw it away?
. .
St. Francis: Yes, sir.
. .
God: These Suburbanites must be relieved in the summer when we cut back on the rain
and turn up the heat. That surely slows the growth and saves them a lot of work.
. .
St. Francis: You aren't going to believe this Lord, but when the grass stops growing
so fast, they drag out hoses and pay more money to water it, so they can continue
to mow it and pay to get rid of it.
. .
God: What nonsense! At least they kept some of the trees. That was a sheer stroke
of genius, if I do say so myself. The trees grow leaves in the spring to provide beauty and
shade in the summer. In the autumn they fall to the ground and form a natural blanket to
. keep the moisture in the soil and protect the trees and bushes. Plus, as they rot, the leaves
become compost to enhance the soil. It's a natural circle of life.
. .
St. Francis: You'd better sit down, Lord. As soon as the leaves fall, the Suburbanites rake
them into great piles and pay to have them hauled away.
. .
God: No way! What do they do to protect the shrubs and tree roots in the winter to
keep the soil moist and loose?
. .
St Francis: After throwing the leaves away, they go out and buy something called mulch.
They haul it home and spread it around in place of the leaves.
. .
God: And where do they get this mulch?
. .
St. Francis: They cut down the trees and grind them up to make mulch.
. .
God: Enough! I don't want to think about this anymore. Saint Catherine,
you're in charge of the arts. What movie have you scheduled for us tonight?
. .
St. Catherine: 'Dumb and Dumber,' Lord. It's a really stupid movie about . . . .
. .
God: Never mind -- I think I just heard the whole story from Saint Francis!


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RE: getting rid of clover in lawn

i LOVE that joke, that is so funny.


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RE: getting rid of clover in lawn

LOL Great story tiffy!

As far as the clover I don't mind it in my lawn but the kids sure do hate it when they step on a bee. OUCH!! So I have to find a way to eliminate it around the swing set. Other then that I've been letting it grow. I tried to just pick the flowers until this fall when I plan to plug, reseed, and compost the yard which should help the grass over take it but that failed when it started growing faster then I could pick it so I had to use a small amount of spay (I hate that).

As far as dandelions I knew someone that made honey from them. I hate huney but some people said it was good.


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RE: getting rid of clover in lawn

ohhh tiffy that was awesome!! LOL it sooo fits us too!! LOL we do have a habit of throwing good things away!! LOL those of us who have the means. LOL **big grinn still thinking of the joke!!** as far as the clovers go man, i love the smell!! and at first i did want them to go, ya know, they are kinda yucky cuz of the lawn being a lawn, but now, i see the beauty!! they smell awesome, i'm a fragrance person, and i love the fact that the bee's are around all the time, now the kids don't like it, but i've told them, don't mess with them and they wont' mess with you. be calm. that's what they go on. talla is a very happy person, so she never gets stung. tabor is high strung, so ocassionally he gets stung. i did once, i'm a barefooted person, i stepped on one. i taped it and pulled the stinger out, put vinegar on it and was done with it. LOL ~Medo


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RE: getting rid of clover in lawn

Oh Tiffy, thanks for sharing. That was so funny, so right on that I had to print it! I personally don't understand the mindset of people who can't seem to see the all around beauty the clovers have to offer.

But, then again, I guess they wouldn't get my "eccentric" mindset either ;-)

Michelle


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RE: getting rid of clover in lawn

THERE ONCE WAS A BIT OF CLOVER
I THINK LEFT OVER FROM DOVER
MY YARD IT HAD FOUND
AND NOW I AM BOUND
TO MAKE DAMN SURE IT MOVES OVER


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RE: getting rid of clover in lawn

Hi - Have been reading all the posts again. Momsathome3x, how much sugar per foot, how often? Or anyone know??
Thanks.
Sunny


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RE: getting rid of clover in lawn

My advice would be to NOT get rid of the clover in your lawn. Clover is a very beneficial plant for lawns, as it adds nitrogen and grows low.

I'm actually going to rip out my grass and put in clover. I don't have the time to fertilize picky grass that will just decide to turn yellow and die in the summer, anyway. I'd rather have beautiful, luscious clover.

Here is a link that might be useful: Clover Improves Your Lawn


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RE: getting rid of clover in lawn

The EZ solution to removing clover from a lawn is to do NOTHING. Clover competes easily and out-performs grass only when the nitrogen level is low. As the clover adds nitrogen to the soil, the grass grows stronger and eventually chokes out the clover. The clover is helping your grass. If you remove it, you'll have to fertilize your grass so that no other weeds take over. Mow the clover as it sends up flower heads so it won't go to seed. This helps the grass too.


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RE: getting rid of clover in lawn

Clover comes into its own when there isn't enough rain. It stays green long after the grass has gone brown.


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RE: getting rid of clover in lawn

Umm, clover isn't great for allergy suffers, so better eradication method would be good. thanks for the great posts. My laughs today were guffaughs.


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RE: getting rid of clover in lawn

What ever is used to "get rid" of clover could damage tyhe soil or harm the Soil Food Web and that should be anathema to any organic gardener/farmer.


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RE: getting rid of clover in lawn

Well, I think that clover is more desirable than grass, but it's not _my_ lawn.

But unless you feel the need to get rid of every last leaf of clover, I would recommend establishing conditions in your lawn that are favorable for grass and unfavorable for clover, so that the grass will outcompete the clover without you having to do the work of trying to kill the clover plant by plant.

Nitrogen fertilizer is one strategy - grass likes it and clover dislikes it. I also seem to recall reading that clover and grass like different mowing heights and different watering practices; I'm failing to find that source now, but it could be a worthwhile area to research.

As one other concern, is your lawn a suitable place for the grass that you're tring to grow? For example, has tree shade increased over the years, so that it might be worthwhile to seed with a shade-tolerant grass?


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