Return to the The Garden Party Forum | Post a Follow-Up

 o
Something new(?) for supper

Posted by agnespuffin (My Page) on
Fri, Jan 13, 12 at 15:25

I have a couple of old cookbooks that have been around for a long, long time. They are fun to read and imagine cooking these things on an old wood stove.

There are a few that suggest combinations and seasonings that I would never have thought of.

My hubby (the cook) and I got a big kick out of this one. See what you think.

HAMBURGER PUDDING (??????)

Fifteen cents worth of round steak, piece of suet, three good-sized onions, cut fine, five eggs, three slices of stale bread soaked in cold water, then squeesed out; salt, pepper and sage to taste. Make into a big pone and put in pan with half cupful of hot lard: set in oven and brown, then pour water over and bake three quarters of an hour.

How big would 15 cents worth of round steak be today?

This was taken from the 1912 edition of the "Favorite Southern Recipes," collected and published by the Southern Ruralist Magizine.

There are 20 (yes, 20)recipes just for chocolate cake.


Follow-Up Postings:

 o
RE: Something new(?) for supper

"pudding"???? I especially love three slices of stale bread soaked in cold water, then squeesed out" Yum. Words cannot express what I think of that tasty meal! What do you serve with it? A big bottle of ketchup (my oldest brother's go to. I hate it. He put it on everything, including lasagne when he was young). Suet doesn't really bother me as that might've given it some sort of better flavor. EW?!


 o
RE: Something new(?) for supper

If you think about it, it's really a meatloaf. The sage leaves me cold. Wouldn't like that with beef and associate it with foul or pork. Celery in it, and I'd eat it.


 o
RE: Something new(?) for supper

It's that half cupful of hot lard that gets me.


 o
RE: Something new(?) for supper

Hey, we make suet pudding. Really good. Sounds bad though.


 o
RE: Something new(?) for supper

In the old days suet was about the only fat/oils to be had, at least on the farms.
These days it seems that olive oil is the fad.


 o
RE: Something new(?) for supper

Adding some sort of fat when processing very lean beef is necessary for the mincing to make it burger (suet is preferable) and done routinely when butchering. That's why suet is so hard to come by during deer season when I need it for holiday baking. Half a cup of lard is only four ounces and given three onions and five eggs are used for this loaf, I imagine $.15 cents of round steak was a large quantity. That's about 8 level tbs. of lard........ I'd add that to a large roasting pan. Does it say how many people this "pudding" would serve?


 o
RE: Something new(?) for supper

  • Posted by tibs 5/6 OH (My Page) on
    Sat, Jan 14, 12 at 7:54

I have Miss Parlola's cookbook from the 1880's. Had instructions for larding a venison roast to keep it from getting dry. You cut srips of lard 1/2" thick by 2' long (I think) and used your larding needle to pull them into the roast leaving some sticking out. Anyone have a larding needle in the kithcen utensil drawer?


 o
RE: Something new(?) for supper

Yes, I have and used it about a week ago when a neighbor gave me a part of a deer haunch. If you can't find "speck", the fat part from thick-cut bacon works too. Mine is about 50 years old and a normal part at that time in a German kitchen.
Soaked bread belongs in a meatloaf, but it needs to be a good bread, not that slimy mess which normal store white bread makes.


 o
RE: Something new(?) for supper

  • Posted by pamven z5neastindiana (My Page) on
    Sat, Jan 14, 12 at 10:20

This sound like many Amish recipies still used around here....esp the bread part. When you're feeding 10+ mouths you really need to add the fillers.


 o
RE: Something new(?) for supper

I too have a larding needle. In fact, I now have several. My first one is from my Grandmother, brought over from Germany, and about a year ago, Big Lots stores had some for sale. Shocked the heck out of me, I have never seen them here before. I bought about 5, extras for me and to give away to some hunting freinds.


 o
RE: Something new(?) for supper

That's a funny old recipe -- love it!


 o
RE: Something new(?) for supper

I'm married to a butcher. I have every implement invented for cutting or cooking meat. LOL. Well, all but a cleaver. I can't believe he didn't come with a cleaver.


 o
RE: Something new(?) for supper

Some of my relatives were hunters, and suet was an important commodity. In fact, rendering any kind of fat was important.
For one thing, we lived in a "cold" country, and the fat was important to keep us functioning. That was before olive oil, corn oil or butter for that matter.


 o
RE: Something new(?) for supper

never heard of a larding needle and looked i up here isa uTube video showing how it is used.

Here is a link that might be useful: Larding needle - YouTube


 o
RE: Something new(?) for supper

Now I know what that thing was in the junk drawer in Grandma's kitchen.

Here's another one for you to think about.

....."Ammonia Crackers.

..."The tablespoonsful of carbonate of ammonia, two eggs, two cupsful of sugar, one pint of warm sweet milk, one cupful of butter, one teaspoon of oil of lemon, flour enough to make a stiff dough, Cream butter and sugar, add beaten eggs.

Dissolve ammonia in milk and add to other ingrediates. Beat one half hour. Roll thin and bake..."

What was the ammonia and did you notice BEAT ONE HALF HOUR?


 o
RE: Something new(?) for supper

This wasn't your household cleaning ammonia, it's a powder and food grade....and some of my old cooking books (I still use) mention it or to use double action baking powder if we have it. You can't use it in heavy stuff or the gas doesn't dissipate and it tastes nasty, but it can be used in thin baked goods like saltines. And yes..... I was just thinking the other day about whipping cream with a rotary hand mixer. I was married more than a few years before I got my first electric mixer. I can also remember my poor grandpa whipping egg whites to make sea foam candy with a spoon. It's fluffy like divinity and it takes forever even with an electric mixer. My g'mother was blind, and she would stand behind him and recount to him how to make that sort of stuff, and was likely to dip the tips of her fingers into the fluff to see if it were mixed long enough. Bless his heart. He was so patient.


 o
RE: Something new(?) for supper

  • Posted by tibs 5/6 OH (My Page) on
    Sun, Jan 15, 12 at 8:37

Thanks for the link to the larding video. Did you notice they also used it to pull what looked like cheese thru a roast? Hmmm. We got a 1/4 of a grass fed long horn steer to freeze last summer. It is pretty lean. The butcher wouldn't say he didn't think much of that kind of meat, but he did reccommend making it all hamburger. Which I didn't. I have the tongue and heart., no one else wanted them. We did tongue in my 8th grade home ec class. Grossed most of the girls out. I assume we did it because it was cheap.

I have my grandma's recipe for lemon crackers which takes ammonia.

Anybody else call Saltines "Soda crackers"? I have been told that is an old fashioned coloquial expression. Just like it was common practice to call peppers mangos around here when I was a kid.


 o
RE: Something new(?) for supper

Grandmother had a needle for pulling fat bacon through lean meat but she called it a "barding" needle. Wonder if it was just a misunderstanding of the other word or perhaps there is a 'barding" needle. Going to check wikipedia.


 o
RE: Something new(?) for supper

This trip to the Past via the old cookbooks has been most interesting. A lot of the recipes just give the ingredients and expect the reader to know enough about cooking to put them together.

Another thing that interested me was the use of CHARCOAL in canning fruits or vegetables. A lump about the size of a nutmeg was place on top of the contents and the jar was sealed. It was supposed to improve the taste and condition of the fruit or vegetable.

I liked the idea behind the name of this one:

CHEAP OMELET

..."One cupful of bread crumbs, two-thirds cupful of sweet milk, two eggs, beaten and stirred in, a pinch of salt and butter. Place in oven until it sets...."


 o
RE: Something new(?) for supper

About the round steak hamburger meat, my mom thinks that fifteen cents worth probably means one pound.

She's not that old, but remembers buying amounts of meat described by the price per pound.

According to the site below, pricier meats like bacon and regular steak were 24 and 23 cents per pound, so hamburger might have been as low as 15:

Here is a link that might be useful: 1912 information


 o
RE: Something new(?) for supper

I'm assuming the round steak was bought intact and ground at home, since they didn't refer to it as minced. If it were sold as minced beef (burger) the suet would have already been incorporated into it. I buy lean pork loin to make my own chariso and grind it. Well, now that Mexican food is becoming mainstream I can buy it at market.

I remember my Mama sending us to the little corner market with the instructions to buy a quarter's worth of bologna. Don't imagine the author would have ever guessed a pound slab of round would ever sell for five spot.


 o
RE: Something new(?) for supper

Grandma wouldn't dream of buying ground meat at he meat market. She always bought a quarters worth of chuck and ground it in a Universal hand operated grinder, I still have that grinder and it is used once in a while. Has to be well over 100 years old. She always said you don't know what they grind in that hamburger. We almost never had hamburger as such but often had meat loaf.


 o
RE: Something new(?) for supper

Back in the day, nothing was wasted. In Sweden they made Blood Pudding from pigs blood. Blood tounge in aspic, the aspic at that time was chicken gelatine.
The "Cheap Omelet" sounds like the oven omelet we had in Sweden, but these days we also include bacon . I guess we got "rich" enough at some point to include bacon.
My relative, the hunter, made needles from bones from animals, and "thread" from sinew.
Very interesting thread.


 o
RE: Something new(?)( for supper

agnespuffin , oh I dd noticed the "BEAT ONE HALF HOUR?" That not going to happen in our house. I may like and use some of the old time recipes, but I'll also use my new time saver appliances.


 o
RE: Something new(?) for supper

Another one to ponder on:

EGGLESS, MILKLESS, BUTTERLESS CAKE

..."One cupful of sugar, one cupful of water, two cupsful of raisins, a half cupful of lard. a fourth teaspoon of salt, one teaspoonful on cinnamon, one teasponful of nutmeg, a half teaspoonful of cloves. Mix and boil three minutes. When cold, add one teaspoonful of soda disolved in one tablespoonful of boiling water, one teaspoonful of baking powder and two cupsful of flour..."

The writer doesn't say a thing about baking it.


 o
RE: Something new(?) for supper

It might have been boiled in a muslin bag. Gandle makes suet pudding, as do I. It looks to the novice eye like a fruitcake, but isn't. It is not baked, but simmered in boiling water in a bag to give it form. Ours is large and usually takes about five hours to get firm and done, and my parents usually stayed up Christmas eve making it and we children could smell the spicy aroma of it rising up the stairs from the kitchen. Daddy would sometimes hang the bag from a tree branch outside to dry and cool. That night with the pudding cooking and the anticipation made sleep almost impossible. I don't think either of my kids shall carry on the tradition. One likes it, one doesn't and it's an act of love to make one and not cheap. Our family has been making it forever it seems and I don't know if it came from our English or Scot line.

My g'mother made apple dumplings the same way, each one wrapped in its own little muslin tied by butcher's twine and floating in a pot of simmering water. They were heavenly. I made it once that way. Way lot of work.


 o
RE: Something new(?) for supper

You could be right! I found two recipes for suet pudding in the book. One was put in a bag and put in boiling water. The other one, simply said, "Steam three and one half hours.

Do you know how they would have steamed something?

You all are lucky...no one in my family on either side were cooks. I learned the hard way...by myself after I got married! LOL


 o
RE: Something new(?) for supper

Actually I was not encouraged to cook as a young woman either, although my Mama was one of the best cooks I ever knew. However, I did my share of KP and witnessed her in action. So, I had a steep learning curve too.

I've never steamed puddings so don't know, but did know it was an option. One sees so many desserts in days gone by boiled in bags. I've baked in ovens with no thermostats, and it's tedious and tricky, cracking the doors or damping down. You got around it, if possible and boiling in a bag was an easy option.


 o
RE: Something new(?) for supper

  • Posted by mwheel East. WV-Z.6 (My Page) on
    Mon, Jan 16, 12 at 8:47

As recently as the early fifties, my Mother sent me to the local Safeway with an onion. I'd buy a pound of round steak, ask for it to be ground, and he'd include the onion in the grinding. That seems incredible to me, now--mainly b/c as a teenager, I can't imagine my wanting to do that! :>)


 o
RE: Something new(?) for supper

Thanks for the video Minnie. I had no idea what a larding needle was nor how it could be used. Following Minnie's lead, I found "instructions for steaming a pudding."

I'm such a good customer at a local kitchen gadget store that I recently spent a few days working there. I took some of my pay in trade: a lovely ceramic coated non-stick fry pan (I'll never go back to Teflon), some kitchen containers, a magnetic knife blade protector... I even got a gorgeous 8.5" MAC knife as a "bonus." I definitely found my new favorite knife brand in the process. That MAC is a dream!

Count me as another one who left the nest unable to cook. I'm learning fast, and fascinated by the reality that the more I learn, the less I realize I know. I've got at least a few decades of serious study ahead of me.

Tibs, I've added tongue to my repertoire in the last year and am glad I did so. Two words of advice: Pressure cooker! I've done it just plain, thinly sliced, with a parsley, lemon, garlic sauce, and cubed up in tacos de lingua. For the latter, I used this recipe, but adapted it to use my pressure cooker. I definitely liked what slicing and browning did to the texture of the meat. The texture of tongue is definitely "different"... but different is often delicious!


 o
RE: Something new(?) for supper

  • Posted by tibs 5/6 OH (My Page) on
    Mon, Jan 16, 12 at 10:04

Thanks for the recipe! I have never used a pressure oooker- though my mom used one all the time. The recipe to boil the tongue is way more detailed than my Fanny Farmer.

My son got me a new cook book - the one that is the bible for todays cooks Called How to cook everything - I think- it is on the nightstand upstairs as it is currently bedside reading. It has no tongue recipe. Or any organ meat recipe. Maybe liver.


 o
RE: Something new(?) for supper

My mother used to make tongue, and she sliced it thin for sandwiches. I ate it, but with my lips skinned back like when you order a dog to eat a piece of apple. LOL. She fixed kidneys once, and never again. I asked my g'ma how to fix them and she said it was easy........just 'bile' the p*** out of them. The last time I went to a little butcher shop in England and had a piece of pork cut, it was near the end of the day and the clerk whispered she slipped a kidney in as a bonus. OMG. I politely thanked her and left it up to my kids how to dispose of/cook it.

I'm particularly fond of an English dish called faggots, and it's like little tiny meat loaves and there are all sorts of organ meats in it, including the lights or lungs. Waste not, want not. Americans think the national cuisine has ventured away from this type of consumption, but it actually hasn't if you read the labels on some processed foods. The one I thought was particularly funny was a package of hot dogs where cow lips were one of the ingredients.


 o
RE: Something new(?) for supper

I have a cookbook from 1878 written by Marian Harland, (a pseudonyme) the most snobbish woman that you can imagine. How she talks down to her readers. Her languag is quite florid and one gets the impression that she thinks of herself as more genteel than anyone else.

In her foreword, she lectures about how you must use every leftover crumb and bone from the platter. that some might put in the "swill-pot". Furthermore, do not be deceived by the pitious whining of the "basketbeggar", he who appears at your base-ment with a sad story. She calls herself a good Christian woman (she was married to a minister) who will decide who is worthy of her charity.

I went onto the Internet to see if the cookbook could be found there. Sure enough, this woman wrote many books including several cookbooks and there is one of hers, published at a later date than the one that I have, that has been fully digitized. Also the one that was written about by tibs, Miss Parlola's cookbook is detailed there.

In the 1878 edition, Miss Harland suggests that one corner of your kitchen should be devoted just to your "tools".

"Have your scoop flour-sifter; your patent pie-lifter, and oyster-broiler; your star-toaster; your pie-crimper, vegetable and nutmeg grater; gravy strainer, colander, biscuit-cutter, skimmers, larding needles, wire, and perforated, and slit and fluted spoons; your weights and measures, and the tiny serviceable tinned and enamaled saucepans, Scotch kettles, frying pans, etc. that will retain tidy and serviceable qualities so long in your care, and so soon come to grief in boorish clutches. Set all these, and as many others as you like and can afford to buy�always including the Dover egg-beater and its "Baby" (made for whipping one egg to more purpose than one egg, or anything else as small was ever whipped before)�in array upon walls and shelves, and let the logic of daily events prove how far they will deprive work of the wearing vexatious attendent upon long searches for the right article and its wrong condition when found. Make your helpers�one and all�comprehend that these are your especial property, to be used�and kept clean�by no one else. Let them be looked down upon as toys of a would-be-busy woman, by the superior intellects about you, should they see fit thus to do, and provide such tools as are suited to coarser fingers for them to use. The chances are many to one that your dextrious manipultion of your instruments; the excellence of the products achieved by yourself and them; even the attractive neatness of the display and your corner, will win skeptics, first, to indulgence, then, admiration, then, to imitation. . ."

I have copied the book exactly as she wrote it, including the punctuation (except that some of the dashes come out as question marks on the screen).

On later pages, she suggests that her helpers are Irish women who can't be trusted. Wouldn't you have dreaded going to work for this woman?

In the later edition, she goes on in great detail about the correct way to set a table and how service should be done by the "servers" - how their uniform must be for each meal, etc. It sounds like an English movie about the rich and titled residents of a vast estate.

An example of a menu suggestion, evidently for those with lesser means than her own:
A calf's head, scraped free of hair and well-cleaned, may be bought in country markets for fifty cents, and can be made
into a dainty dish fit for John and John's unexpected friend.


 o
RE: Something new(?) for supper

There is a small slaughter house in the small town near son's farm. He is a friend with the owner and there they used to discard the tongues and tails. They happen to be one of our favorite meats and he gets them free. He has been sharing them with us but I suspect he keeps more than half.

We always serve spinach with the tongue dinner and the leftovers make wonderful sanwiches.

The tails (oxtails) are great braised or in a soup. they have the most delicious gelationius quality. Almost makes your lips stick together.

Been interesting reading how they used to cook and how some still do.


 o
RE: Something new(?) for supper

Moving along just a little. The Rumford Complete Cook Book was most likely my aunt's favorite. (COPYRIGHT 1918) She has notes, etc. all thoughout the little book.

One is a recipe clipped from something that dates back to the rationing period of WWII. Its how to substitute Hot Milk and baking Power for the rationed shortning. It saved the precious rationing stamp for meat instead of using it for shortning for a cake.

We lived where there was plenty of fish and shrimp so meat was not a problem. Shoes were. I was at that horrible teen time when I out grew shoes at a fantasic rate. It took rationing stamps from my grandmother and my mother to keep me shod for school.


 o
RE: Something new(?) for supper

I also belong to the tongue and oxtail eaters, but they are now hard to find. 20 - 30 years ago they were cheap around here. Last summer I found 1 tongue at a local shop, about 1 1/2 lbs, $ 14.00. Smoked tongue (cooked) makes great sandwiches and one of the things I try to get when vising in Germany. A butcher for a large grocery chain told me that tongues now are mostly shipped to upscale restaurants or used in other products.


 o
RE: Something new(?) for supper

I still have my rationing book from those days. Those sure were memorable days.

We were very poor. When we wore the soles of our shoes out, we used newspaper to cover the holes until we outgrew them. When the heels wore out, Dad bought heels from Woolworths and nailed them on himself.

Tongue was cheap and we had it often, served with horseradish. Nowadays, ox-tails seemed quite expensive when we last priced them. It used to be common to see Ox-tail soup on a restaurant menu; now we seldom do.


 o
RE: Something new(?) for supper

And that is why, if one can't butcher their own, a local abetoir is so nice. It's where I get my big bags of ox-tails. Still pricey, because of their rarity. Heck, we had it a lot when I was growing up and it's still my fav soup, but most people younger than me just go eeeewwww and make a face when you tell them about it. Clean kidney suet is even harder to find. I buy the whole chunks intact and peel the membrane and grind my own.


 o
RE: Something new(?) for supper

Forgot to mention that that is where e get our suet and beef bones. Hard to find beef bones in a grocery store. Kidney suet is for our use, the other is bird food.


 o
RE: Something new(?) for supper

I'm fortunate that I live in a place (Santa Clara County, CA) that has a varied population so the foods reflect that population.
We have a very large German population. (See the stats below). Even the national grocery stores around here carry the old-country foods. Tongue, ox-tail, suet, marrow bones etc...
Yum.


Population by First Ancestry

1,633,640 (94.46%) out of the total population of 1,729,378 reported first ancestry.
Santa Clara County % of the Total Population California U.S.
Arab 10,147 0.59% 0.66% 0.50%
Czech 4,819 0.28% 0.27% 0.54%
Danish 9,406 0.54% 0.55% 0.49%
Dutch 15,988 0.92% 1.19% 1.68%
English 109,924 6.36% 7.02% 9.29%
French 40,782 2.36% 2.56% 3.90%
German 145,915 8.44% 9.93% 16.89%
Greek 6,820 0.39% 0.38% 0.45%
Hungarian 5,612 0.32% 0.37% 0.52%
Irish 108,817 6.29% 7.79% 12.01%
Italian 81,889 4.74% 4.33% 5.91%
Norwegian 18,872 1.09% 1.14% 1.55%
Polish 22,692 1.31% 1.45% 3.32%
Portuguese 29,219 1.69% 1.05% 0.48%
Russian 20,955 1.21% 1.25% 1.04%
Scotch-Irish 16,675 0.96% 1.23% 1.77%
Scottish 25,289 1.46% 1.61% 1.97%
Subsaharan African 9,405 0.54% 0.71% 0.88%
Swedish 20,581 1.19% 1.28% 1.45%
Swiss 7,107 0.41% 0.32% 0.34%
Ukrainian 4,867 0.28% 0.27% 0.32%
American 29,297 1.69% 2.66% 6.43%
Welsh 8,212 0.47% 0.52% 0.65%


 o
RE: Something new(?) for supper

Another tongue and tail lover! The taails have gotten pricey since many are sent to Asian countries. The cheapest I have seen them in chicago is $3.50/#. Beef tongue is right up there also.

Several years ago a local Greek market must have bought a truck load. he sold them for .99/# and I kid you not, I bought 6 and froze them. My Mom was in heaven. I have one in the freezer now, and I think I will make it next weekend. And I will remember my Mom and hope she peers over my shoulder when I make the gravy. Ours is a tomato based and has a good splash of maderia in it.


 o
RE: Something new(?) for supper

My mom was a good cook having learned on the farm with a big family and we had tongue, liver and onions, and many other dishes that are not common today. I learned to cook watching her and I like to eat with no limits on types of food. Any thing new is an adventure.

Used to have a cook book that was so complete it was hard to believe. It had the description of how each ingredient was grown, harvested, brought to market, how to choose store and prepare each and recipes they were used in. To me it was the ultimate definitive cook book. Will get a new one one of these days.

Here is a link that might be useful: The Wise Encyclopedia of Cookery: One of the World's Most Definitive Reference Books on Food and Cooking.


 o
RE: Something new(?) for supper

  • Posted by mwheel East. WV-Z.6 (My Page) on
    Tue, Jan 17, 12 at 13:01

This has been a fascinating thread; I've read every post, and learned a lot, but haven't contributed a thing. I confess, even at my advanced age--or perhaps b/c of it-- my taste buds are so common-placed, unrefined, plebian, etc., there is nothing I could add. Maybe grits 'n gravy, but I really don't even want gravy on my grits! :>)


 o
RE: Something new(?) for supper

Perhaps 60 years ago we used to be able to buy sweetbreads in a grocery store in North Platte. We loved them sauteed with mushrooms. Haven't seen any in any store for a great many years. Of course the same store had brains which we did eat once in a while. Brains with scrambled eggs was very good but you didn't want to dwell on what you were eating.
We did have tripe when I was a child, never really liked it very well. Texture was kind of like chewing on a bicycle tire. Head cheese was always made when a hog was butchered. Now I really liked that. Slightly vinegary taste in a jellied buch of meats. About the only thing we didn't eat were the eyeballs


 o
RE: Something new(?) for supper

Found another one that I want to try:

PINEAPPLE CREAM

...."Rub a pound each of butter and sugar to a cream. Stir in a pound of grated pineapple. Then add the yolks of three eggs, well beaten, and a cupful of milk. Beat tbe whites of the eggs stiff and light and add them last. Line a pudding dish with a rich pie crust rolled very thin. Fill it with the prepared custard and bake in a moderate oven.."

There's one thing for sure...it would be rich and sweet! I am guessing that the pineapple would be fresh, not canned.


 o
RE: Something new(?) for supper

Only just reading this thread: Gandle, it's known as barding in the UK, where we still 'bard' game birds like pheasant etc with bacon, to keep it moust while roasting. We often do the same with roast turkey too, to keep the breast meat from drying out.

My grandmother also always ground her own mince (we don't call it ground meat) and I have her mincing machine and still use it too.

Adding squeezed out bread to meat is a standard thing in Italian households when making meatballs. Ideally, the bread slice is soaked in milk then squeezed. It really does make the meatball lighter and 'fluffier'.
My mother used to make oxtail soup a lot when I was a child.


 o
RE: Something new(?) for supper

Exactly, to keep it moist. Good to do with leaner meats, e.g. rabbit. Bard it with goose or duck or goose fat and it's divine!

So how can it a squeezed piece of bread make it lighter and/or fluffier?! Wow. That's exactly the opposite of what I envisioned, and why I commented. Hm.


 o
RE: Something new(?) for supper

I don't know exactly, but I've done it myself and it works - I think the bread can't absorb any more moisture, but its texture (you need stale bread) allows it to separate the meat bits a little or something. At least, that's my theory. But I agree, it sounds entirely counter-intuitive.

Now lets start the discussion about whether you cook the meatballs first, or put them raw into the sauce to cook . . . . :) (I've watched my MIL and her sister have this argument many, many times).


 o
RE: Something new(?) for supper

  • Posted by tibs 5/6 OH (My Page) on
    Tue, Jan 17, 12 at 18:08

Caliope had to look up "ab'at'toir" Word I never saw before for a slaughter house or butchery. Living on the edge of Amish country and a big hunting county (first time in 5 years that we were not the number one white tail deer kill county, one over got the prize) we have quite a few butchers. Next year when I get my 1/4 of the longhorn steer I am going to ask for the tail!

My 1940 something Poultry Association cooking pamphelt's recipe for chicken stock is to use the.....feet! That brought a EEUUUCH from me. Anybody ever do that?


 o
RE: Something new(?) for supper

We put a handful of quick cook oatmeal in our hamburger patties. I guess it works like bread in the meat balls. It seems to soak up the meat juices and then swell a little and hold the juice in instead of allowing it to cook out.

Try this for a great Hamburger Steak. (my recipe, not an old one)

BIG steaks for two. Medium steaks for three or four.

1/2 lb of ground meat
handful of quick cook oatmeal
1 egg, beat well before adding
finely chopped onion, celery and garlic.
Salt and pepper

Mix it all together, divide into portions and fry or grill.


 o
RE: Something new(?) for supper

tibs, there was a thread on the cooking forum which showed a step by step for using chicken and feet and everyone proclaimed it the best. So there you go. It is good. Probably a bone marrow thing. That always makes things better.


 o
RE: Something new(?) for supper

I've made stock with feet many times. It "has legs" in that it is so rich and supple, it develops a jello-like consistency at room temp. The flavor is awesome. Before I switched to only buying chicken whole from a local producer (which led to a constant supply of carcasses for stock) I used to buy chicken feet from a local Asian market for stock making. They were inexpensive, and it amused me they were always labeled as "chickens paws."


 o
RE: Something new(?) for supper

I get such a kick out of reading this thread because it seems to be so universal. We're talking about food from several areas of the world.


 o
RE: Something new(?) for supper

chicken paws. HA! I love it.


 o
RE: Something new(?) for supper

No one has mentioned Chicken Gizzards.

A brown stew made of gizzards is great....the problem is finding a store that sells them


 o
RE: Something new(?) for supper

I love chicken gizzards! My local grocer sells them. Sometimes. And liver, I love liver. Course, I eat whatever doesn't eat me first.

:)


 o
RE: Something new(?) for supper

I also like liver, liver and onions is yummy. But I have given up buying liver because I don't know where that liver comes from. After all, the liver is a filter. Does it come from a country where they use pesticide,hormones etc...
Re the chicken gizzards, I buy whole chickens and freeze the gizzards, when I have enough, I make chicken stock/soup.


 o
RE: Something new(?) for supper

Thank you but no thank you on the gizzards. They're like chewing through the little rubber wheels on a Tonka truck.


 o
RE: Something new(?) for supper

  • Posted by tibs 5/6 OH (My Page) on
    Thu, Jan 19, 12 at 18:15

None of the cats will eat the gizzards, so I figure they are not fit for human consumption. Now chicken hearts, the kids use to fignt over who gets it. You know what really irritates me is when I buy a whole chicken and the little bag inside does not have gizzards, heart, liver and neck, but maybe 3 gizzards and neck, or some other alien combination. Obviously they have a big vat of the "innards" and just grab a handful of what ever. I want my chicken's own parts.


 o
RE: Something new(?) for supper

Lol tibs, I know what you mean. A few times I've gotten whole chickens with "alien" parts like three kidneys, two necks etc...but I dealt with it. But after your post, I'm thinking that there might be a chicken gizzard "business" going on. Who knows where the gizzards come from?


 o
RE: Something new(?) for supper

I'm laughing at Tibs' comments too. I was going to mention my cat experience with them, but it's indelicate. I once cooked them up nicely and fed them to my kitties, who ate them and them promptly barfed them back up. That's when I also decided they might not be fit for human consumption.

What irritates me is that I used to buy a lot of packs of chicken backs and necks for soup broth. They are non-existant now in the local markets. Sometimes they'll cut off the backs with the breast sections so you end up paying premiums prices for the scraps parts.

One also doesn't see a lot of whole frying chickens at market anymore. Roasters, maybe. Used to be every young woman could snap the joints and cut up a nice frying chicken in a matter of minutes. I'll bet that's becoming a lost art. Don't even address how to clean and pluck one.


 o
RE: Something new(?) for supper

  • Posted by pamven z5neastindiana (My Page) on
    Thu, Jan 19, 12 at 21:46

Sitting here wondering how Suzi knows
what the rubber wheels on Tonka trucks taste like.....


 o
RE: Something new(?) for supper

I can't look at a gizzard and not think of what we used to find in them when we cleaned poultry on my uncle's farm when I was young. Chickens eat all sorts of weird stuff. I've pulled Christmas light bulbs, dimes, tacks, beads, screws, washers, and all sorts of nonsense out of the gizzards. It's been a long time since I've cleaned and plucked one. (And I've almost managed to get the stench out of my hands!)

My freezer is was full of backs and necks. (I got around to making and pressure canning a batch of stock the other day. The next batch is going to be noodle-less chicken noodle soup.) I love to spatchcock, so I accumulate backs and necks pretty quickly.

I cook up the little bag o' goodies in my chickens for the dogs, and they love me for it (though I suspect they'd love me even if I didn't). But I learned the hard way to halve the kidneys and to eschew the microwave when I do this. What's the hard way? I nuked the giblets (whole kidneys included), and when one exploded in the microwave, I ran to the door to open it. The second I stuck my nose inside to figure out what had happened... BLAMO! Another kidney sprayed my face with, um, shrapnel. Seriously... cut them in half and cook them in a skillet, people!

West, with the exception of some of the fish, I know where the livers of every animal in my freezer come from, and what those animals ate. :o)


 o
RE: Something new(?) for supper

I too want to be acquainted with the animal whose liver I am eating.


 o
RE: Something new(?) for supper

jazmynsmom , I know what you mean about what chickens eat and how it ends up in the gizzards. I've been there and done the cleaning of the gizzards of all kinds of "stuff". But the regular "stuff" is not I'm worried about. I'm more worried about the unknown.


 o
RE: Something new(?) for supper

Agnespuffin, I found some downloadable online copies of The Rumford Complete Cookbook -- check the link below under the author's name; Wallace, Lily Haxworth:

Here is a link that might be useful: Wallace, Lily Haxworth


 o
RE: Something new(?) for supper

Well GPer's, I blame you all for the spend today at H Mart for 2 very large packs of oxtails. Dad is in heaven at the thought of the stew to come. And so am I. It is a two day process to make so I will be busy next weekend.


 o Post a Follow-Up

Please Note: Only registered members are able to post messages to this forum.

    If you are a member, please log in.

    If you aren't yet a member, join now!


Return to the The Garden Party Forum

Information about Posting

  • You must be logged in to post a message. Once you are logged in, a posting window will appear at the bottom of the messages. If you are not a member, please register for an account.
  • Posting is a two-step process. Once you have composed your message, you will be taken to the preview page. You will then have a chance to review your post, make changes and upload photos.
  • After posting your message, you may need to refresh the forum page in order to see it.
  • Before posting copyrighted material, please read about Copyright and Fair Use.
  • We have a strict no-advertising policy!
  • If you would like to practice posting or uploading photos, please visit our Test forum.
  • If you need assistance, please Contact Us and we will be happy to help.


Learn more about in-text links on this page here