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Helianthus salicifolius 'Table Mountain'

Posted by aachenelf z5 Mpls, MN (My Page) on
Sun, Jan 19, 14 at 12:26

This one really caught my eye even though I swore off Helianthus because of past aphid problems. Is anyone growing it and is it as cool as it looks?

From what I've read, it was developed in New Zealand in 1993 from a cross between Helianthus 'Golden Pyramid' and 'Autumn Queen' and only grows to about 16 inches tall. Zone hardiness is a bit confusing depending on what website you look at - anywhere from zone 4, 5 or 6 and up.

Take a look at the video in the link below. It's short.

Hmmmmm.... Just noticed, it sure looks a lot taller than 16 inches in that video.

Kevin

Here is a link that might be useful: Helianthus

This post was edited by aachenelf on Sun, Jan 19, 14 at 12:28


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Helianthus salicifolius 'Table Mountain'

16inches!!!! 16feet is more my understanding of these.
Years ago, I was persuaded to give the willow-leaved sunflower a go and was, in fact, bitterly disappointed in the vast swathe of foliage with a few minuscule flowers somewhere miles out of view at the top (I am a short woman). Have pretty much sworn off these prairie stalwarts since my soil is too dry and thin to really have an attempt at prairie plantings - shame because they would look good, I think, on my sunny, flat and open allotment. The whole prairie garden was a harsh lesson in putting the right plants in the right place - an epic fail en masse but I still manage to sneak in a few of these toughies in a less ambitious scheme.


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RE: Helianthus salicifolius 'Table Mountain'

From the Missouri Botanical Garden website:

Helianthus salicifolius is native to prairie regions of Nebraska, Kansas, Missouri, Oklahoma and Texas. It typically grows to 5-8' tall. 'Table Mountain' is a cultivar that is primarily distinguished from species plants by its compact, flat-topped habit. It typically grows to only 16" tall and as wide. It is the result of a controlled cross-pollination that took place in Auckland, New Zealand in 1993 between Helianthus 'Golden Pyramid' (female) and Helianthus 'Autumn Queen' (male). Foliage is covered in late summer to early fall with a profuse bloom of 1.5-2" diameter sunflowers with golden yellow rays and brown center disks. Narrow, linear, rich green leaves (each to 3-4” long and to 3/8" wide) form an attractive foliage clump. U.S. Plant Patent Applied For (PPAF).


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RE: Helianthus salicifolius 'Table Mountain'

  • Posted by dbarron Z6/7 (Oklahoma) (My Page) on
    Mon, Jan 20, 14 at 19:41

I can only speak to the species. I have to mostly agree with the English lady?, the flowers on the species are quite small and unless grown in harsh conditions, very large and floppy plant.
It's really hard to believe someone made a pretty little plant out of it...but I see blogs and Missourri Botanical Garden entries that seem to imply they did.


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RE: Helianthus salicifolius 'Table Mountain'

I love the species and have not been able to overwinter the hybrid. Helianthus salicifolius looks like a giant ornamental grass until it takes on its few daisies as late as November here. It blooms just before the snows come. It's certainly not suitable for the front of the border, but in a mixed grass bed, the back of the border or the shrubbery, it's really a fun plant. The daisies are not huge, and are not incredibly conspicuous, but then, most grasses don't have grand inflorescences anyway. It's spreading, though it does not self-seed here. It's also easy to control.
It is also a stand-up plant. Despite it's great height, it seems sturdy enough in all weather. We get a lot of requests for this plant for its foliage alone.
However, I've had no luck with any of the shorter hybrids.


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RE: Helianthus salicifolius 'Table Mountain'

Yeah, I mainly grew it for the foliage and the screening value.....but it was just a monster, almost as overweening as bamboo. It didn't fall over but was essentially.....boring.
Course, if I was planting on acreage, I might reconsider.....but, in truth, I have become less enamoured of many of these sunflower, rudbeckia and yellow daisy things. I find myself going back in time, through the taste and style lexicon.....and landing somewhere in the late 70's, with a burgeoning interest in shrubs and conifers.

It's all cyclical, hey?


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RE: Helianthus salicifolius 'Table Mountain'

nina - Thanks for telling me about your experience with some of these "shorter" hybrids. To be honest, I was even aware there any out there until I stumbled upon this plant.

There are a few images out there for 'Table Mountain' if anyone cares to Google the plant. Yes, it does appear to actually exist and no it is not 8 or more feet tall. In some of the photos it does appear to be maybe 16 or less inches tall, but in that video (if anyone watched it), it sure looks to be at least a 2 footer, but still not a monster by any means.

I wonder if salicifolius is less prone to the aphid problem? That's my biggest concern.

Kevin


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RE: Helianthus salicifolius 'Table Mountain'

  • Posted by dbarron Z6/7 (Oklahoma) (My Page) on
    Wed, Jan 22, 14 at 9:59

I grew my species out in my "prairie". I'm sorry to say that I didn't watch it close enough to tell if it developed aphids or not...but it certainly didn't cause it any issue if it did.


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