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Questions about Foxglove / Digitalis purpurea �Camelot Lavender�

Posted by brit5467 7b/8a Coastal VA (My Page) on
Wed, May 7, 14 at 23:10

I googled Foxglove (in general) regarding full sun vs part shade and even found a couple threads on here. But seems there was much difference of opinion on the web AND on GW.

However, like I said, that was about Foxglove in general. Everyone was naming different varieties. So I kinda got the impression it depends on what variety you have.

So I have a few questions. I found a half gallon plant today on clearance.� No ID tag but after research, I'm pretty certain it's Camelot Lavender.

1 ~ Anyone have experience with this particular variety? (I don't need replies about other ones varieties since as I said, I think it depends on the variety.)

2 ~ Full sun or part shade? Two websites I found that sell seeds said full sun.

3 ~ I'm confused about when it says it doesn't come back after the 2nd year. I understand what a biennial is, but does yours reseed and come back? Knowing this will determine where I will plant it.

4 ~ And the biggest question. Since this was clearance, it was in pretty bad shape. Each of the stalks of blooms were broke and bent over, just below the blooms. I don't know if it was from the weight or what, but other than that, the plant looked healthy.

5 ~ I cut each bloom stalk off just above new growth but didn't know if I should cut it back down even further? Will it still bloom more now? And if not, will it blome later on in the season?

I'd take a pic but it's nighttime. If it would be helpful, I can post one tomorrow.

Also, any helpful hints about Camelot Lavendar would be appreciated.

Thanks,
Bonnie


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Questions about Foxglove / Digitalis purpurea �Camelot Lave

Hi, Bonnie. I'm not going to answer about Camelot foxgloves exactly, but address your second question: the reason that some list full sun or part shade. I doubt it is about the variety so much as the climate conditions the plant will be growing under. I live in Southern California; the winters can be mild, but the summer is hot and dry. Foxgloves do better here in part shade so they receive some midday protection from the sun during the summer months. Otherwise, they cook from the heat of the sun. But in milder climates, where summer temperatures do not reach triple digits, they will often grow better under full sun conditions. But even in our climate, if they receive some heat protection for their roots, or higher humidity, or your live along the coast, they may be able to survive full sun fine. You kind of need to tailor the details of growing conditions to your climate. This is true for many plants, not just for foxgloves.


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RE: Questions about Foxglove / Digitalis purpurea �Camelot Lave

Thanks Gyr !!  That's very helpful info.  Makes sense.  I'm on the coast of VA and it gets unbearably hot here in the summer.  VERY high humidity so some days, even tho it's 90 it feels like 100.

Maybe you could provide some more info?  Could you also answer my question #3 about being biennial and reseeding? 

And #5, about reblooming. At least in your experience? 

Much appreciated,
Bonnie


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RE: Questions about Foxglove / Digitalis purpurea �Camelot Lave

Generally, the growth cycle for my foxgloves were to produce foliage and roots the first year, flower the second year, then some of them would return a third year to bloom again. Since they are not reliable for the third year, texts do not generally give that information. The third year's bloom stalks would generally be shorter, but produce several at once. During the second year, the first stalk would usually be single and tall. If the tall stalk was cut back after bloom, several shorter side stalks would form and bloom. It may be that a long growing season would allow time for this, and in a very short season location, perhaps not.

Your plant may bloom again. If it gets some shock from being planted, the change in conditions etc., it may sit until next year. Or it may decide it is done and wither. Hard to say. Sometimes nursery stock is pushed hard to grow to market size, plus they are in a root confined growing condition, so they may be more likely to not be strong enough to bloom another year. You may find that plants put out into your garden at a young age, or started from seed and not disturbed, will be more likely to live longer.

If stalks are left on the plant after bloom, the seed will disperse and you would often get seedlings popping around the garden. [Count on them choosing the most inconvenient of locations, such as between stones in the middle of the walkway. lol] In my garden, they would be found the next spring and that would be their first year of growth.

Now there is a relatively newer foxglove, Foxy, that has been bred to bloom in the first year/season. The rules may be different for that one. I have not grown it in my garden, so I cannot say.


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RE: Questions about Foxglove / Digitalis purpurea �Camelot Lave

I have Camelot Cream which has acted exactly as any other D.purpurea - that is, a short-lived perennial. They are almost all guaranteed to rebloom for a second year and a couple will attempt a 3rd year....but generally, they set seed and die off after a couple of decent years.....but seed will have germinated and grown also. :The main difference between the F1 Camelots and biennial foxgloves is the tendency for Camelots to flower in one season.As for cutting off the main spike, they should branch in the leaf axils but the resulting spikes will be much smaller than the initial spike. If they do fail to flower reliably, they will certainly do so the following year.


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RE: Questions about Foxglove / Digitalis purpurea �Camelot Lave

Thanks to both!! Lotsa good info.

Since my plant is so mature already (1/2 gal) and had 4 flowering spikes I'm wondering if its in the 2nd year already? But campanula, ur saying the Camelots flower in first, so.....I'm still a bit confused.

I need to get it in the ground so guess I will put it on the side of house where it wont fry in sun and can reseed freely.

Thax aagain,
Bonnie


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RE: Questions about Foxglove / Digitalis purpurea �Camelot Lave

Bonnie, if the Camelots are sown in January/February, they will flower that same season - often a bit later than normal (May-June), flowering as late as August - unlike standard biennials which grow a rosette of leaves in one season, then the following year, flower and die. If Camelots are sown in late spring, they will act like a biennial in that they will only send up foliage and will bloom early the next year.Regardless of whether yours is a first or second year plant (and there is some question since I would expect to see one dominant spike for the first bloom cycle so yours may have had one flowering or has been topped at the nursery), there are very good odds that it will flower this year, seed and return the following year. They are classed as perennial....which indeed they are....but expect 3-4 years at most.....and you will get lots of seedlings so the growth and bloom cycles will continue. They are remarkably unfussy about sun or shade but do appreciate some irrigation to reach their full height of around 4feet (D.pupurea can easily manage 6feet).


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RE: Questions about Foxglove / Digitalis purpurea �Camelot Lave

Thanx campanula! I can already see new leaves where the stalks brok and what looks to be a bud!!!! Maybe u can see in thses pics...

Here's pic of plant...


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RE: Questions about Foxglove / Digitalis purpurea �Camelot Lave

Yep - these are secondary spikes but next year, expect a single, much taller spike around June which you can trim when the flowers are blown, for another go-round later in the summer.


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RE: Questions about Foxglove / Digitalis purpurea �Camelot Lave

Thanks Campanula! Don't have any flowers that are that unique looking so I'm a happy camper...lol
Bonnie


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