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Why doesn't every nursery in the country sell.....

Posted by laceyvail 6A, WV (My Page) on
Thu, Jun 19, 14 at 10:30

Spigelia marilandica? I wish I could post a picture of mine, which I got from Seneca Hills Nursery before it closed a few years ago. I have the rarer version with chartreuse instead of yellow at the top of the lipstick red tubes. This plant is extremely adaptable in terms of light exposure and soil, is deer resistant, very hardy and is easily propagated. If people saw it in a nursery, they'd fall all over themselves to buy it. It's by far the most spectacular perennial I've ever seen.

Do you know it? Why doesn't everyone?


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Why doesn't every nursery in the country sell.....

I didn't know it but now that I do, it is on my list for next year. What a beauty!


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RE: Why doesn't every nursery in the country sell.....

  • Posted by dbarron Z6/7 (Oklahoma) (My Page) on
    Thu, Jun 19, 14 at 11:29

Well, there's mainly two reasons. It's rather slow to bulk up, so looks scrawy for at least a year longer than many perennials, thus affecting sales from people that don't see it in bloom. And it's only became "well-known" in the last five years or so. I would expect it to start showing up more in the next few years.


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RE: Why doesn't every nursery in the country sell.....

Dbarron is correct, it's not particularly speedy. I had Ellen's form too, for years, although it mysteriously disappeared in 2012. 6A in WV sounds like cool summers to me: here it could be a bit fussy during extended heatwaves and droughts, compared to some other natives and/or semi-shade plants. Maybe the 3 hottest summers since the thirties of 2010, 2011, 2012 slowly weakened it along with periodic random animal browsing. It wasn't on my priority care last during such semi-emergencies...I figure natives will always be politically correct enough to be popular with nurseries. I spent much more time trying to keep my darn Asarum maximum alive, for example. But anyhow it did bloom every year, and the flowers were appealing. Someone ought to start a nursery "Stuff Seneca Hill used to offer" as there are quite a few things she had semi-regularly that are now impossible to find. I understand why she had to do what she did, but I'll always feel a little hurt I wasn't among the close circle she presumably warned of her intentions. I would have ordered half her catalog. We'd had long email exchanges about my attempts to grow rare South African forbs, from her offerings and Silverhill Seeds.


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RE: Why doesn't every nursery in the country sell.....

Gosh I sound angry. In her defense, she did once offer me some rare free plants, that she wasn't able to offer in the catalog. It just would have been nice to have more of a warning.


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RE: Why doesn't every nursery in the country sell.....

Spigelia marilandica is by far my favorite native plant. Several years ago I moved 3 or 4 from my woods to a garden bed. Now it has increased to a 3 x 3 clump. It requires no staking nor extra water and is totally happy in part sun/shade. When I go around the corner and catch this in full bloom, I always fall in love all over again.


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RE: Why doesn't every nursery in the country sell.....

I just noticed that Well-Sweep Herb Farm sells it. They are local for me, but also ship internationally.


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RE: Why doesn't every nursery in the country sell.....

david, I looked her up on D. Watchdog. It says "closed due to illness". I have the same disappointment about High Country Gardens and a couple other online nursery's that were good sources for hard to find natives. Sources seem to be disappearing. HCG reopened and is still selling plants but the selections are fewer & they have changed to more conventional plants. They closed the local nursery due to the drought causing low sales and are now strictly online. I gather they are trying to appeal to a wider customer base by offering "pretties" and bedding type plants that look less wild.

This plant needs consistent moist conditions. That crosses it off my list.


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RE: Why doesn't every nursery in the country sell.....

  • Posted by dbarron Z6/7 (Oklahoma) (My Page) on
    Thu, Jun 19, 14 at 15:13

Ellen closed due to her husband's health. She felt she owed it to him after he putting up with her plant obsession for all their years. And also, I know the nursery business is very time consuming, and she had retired once already.
I miss her (always chatted on phone every year), I miss her plants, and I'm sure I'll continue to miss both more as more and more nurseries do close *sigh*.
Yep TR, it's a woodlander, but a beautiful one. You'd probably not find it farther east then NE Oklahoma. I found it very tough and persistent in NE Oklahoma...it didn't even die out in two years of my beds being mowed before sale.


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RE: Why doesn't every nursery in the country sell.....

I love this plant as well. As mentioned already they do take their sweet time appearing in the spring and they do have a reputation for being not so hardy BUT I have two and they had no problem making it through this past harsh winter.


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RE: Why doesn't every nursery in the country sell.....

"Sources seem to be disappearing."

I think we've had the greatest extinction of nurseries since 2007 or so to have ever occurred. I think the process is actually over, so you could just mark the years of 2007-2013 as the 5 year crash. But there were signs of what was coming, I think, even in the flush years of 2003-2006, as the RE boom got pumped up. I know some acquaintances of my parents who had been avid purchases of plants in the 1990s no longer were by the 2000s. There was an elderly couple, for example, for whom I'd been a informally paid gardener for as a teen, weeding, dividing, and picking fruits among other things. They had a large plot of very valuable land in the western suburbs of DC. The husband died earlier as is so often the case, I went to his funeral my freshman year of college. But she still did gardening, I remember she'd give me her old Wayside catalogs and I'd see the new hosta varieties she'd ordered had been circled. That couple helped inspire my interest in gardens, in fact. By the 2000s, the wife had sold their land to developers. So, my point is even though the early 1990s recession resulted in a smaller wave of nursery closings, it was not as bad to the industry as a whole. Any how as for the recent decline, many factors too obvious to mention, but the elephant in the room - as it pertains to specialist nurseries like Seneca Hill, is that people just have too many other distractions for things as time consuming as gardening. (NB she did try to sell the whole business, but had no takers) I think Richard Murcott sums it up well, here:
http://www.murcottgarden.com/uncategorized/where-have-all-the-people-gone
He tries to put a positive spin on it. But it's easy to forget we "horticulturalists who network on the web" are a self-selecting group of the extremely interested. If you look broadly, I'm sure many fewer people as a percentage of the population do serious horticultural now as did 30 years ago. I asked another friend of my parents if he was still gardening as much now that he's semi-retired...he said he just doesn't have the time!

Here is a link that might be useful: http://www.murcottgarden.com/uncategorized/where-have-all-the-people-gone


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RE: Why doesn't every nursery in the country sell.....

That hit a nerve. Here where I live, and this is a big city mind you, we have lost nearly every private nursery. Last year another bit the dust due to a fire which burned all their Christmas merchandise, its not what put them under, just the final coffin nail. Used to be there was VARIETY. Now its mostly Home Depot, Lowes, Walmart with a couple surviving nursery's in this whole dad gum city. The stuff you can buy at these places is the common stuff you can buy everywhere. Its boring. Lost is Moesel's Horthaven with the lady who was "unusual" who ran the completely weird nursery that was an adventure in and of itself and Cooper's and Satterlee's and..........

The whole country seems to be turning into one big homogenized boring package store. Finding something different in the plant world for the likes a person like me now means you better learn to sow your own seeds and even those sources are probably threatened. The most irritating thing is, most people seem happy with the package stores since they just want 'pretty plants" to landscape their yards nicely at cheap prices.


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RE: Why doesn't every nursery in the country sell.....

Agreed, Ranger, it is happening almost everywhere. There are pockets of hope here and there: when I was at Berkeley Horticultural Nursery in the Bay Area, I found a nursery crowded with rare plants...and customers. Even though it was late January. (Granted, that is practically early spring time in the Bay Area...Magnolia campbellis starting to bloom and all)

Rarefind in NJ found someone to buy them at the 11th hour, which is good because another major mail order source of rhododendrons has publicly announced their pending retirement.

Plant Delights must be doing well because he is obviously spending far more on display gardens than any other specialist nursery in the country.


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RE: Why doesn't every nursery in the country sell.....

I am just guesstimating but I am thinking that maybe...75% of our plants in our residential garden could only be obtained via independent, very specialized nurseries. With so many of them falling by the wayside one may be forced to obtain such plants only through mail order. I shudder to think how one would begin anew say even...5 years from now.


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RE: Why doesn't every nursery in the country sell.....

Rouge, remember there was a whole other category of rare that isn't even available mail order, once that particular mail order nursery stops. Just off the top of my head, w/o even consulting a catalog, I can think of 5 things that Arborvillage carried that I have _never_ seen anywhere else. Even at Forestfarm. For example I was heart broken when I foolishly tried to my my Quercus libani (from their last year in biz) in early summer. We'd been having cool wet weather and -boom- the minute I move it, heat wave starts. But its death was a happy accident...I replaced it with a Quercus variabils from Woodlander that has grown so much faster that in a couple years, it will have caught up to where the Q. libani would have been. The Q. libani was VERY slow.

(As for moving plants in early summer...I'd told myself I will never do it again. But, there was an attractive Japanese Maple seedling, about 3-4' high, that was blocking an Erica 'Jacqueline' from winter recovery. It was worth saving so I decided it had to be moved now. Darned if the thing doesn't look just fine after 1 very hot week. I watered it every other day of course, but will scale back soon. Japanese maples are very weedy here, but that's one weed I can tolerate. I actually had a couple in the past I debated about selecting...but the last thing the world needs are more JM cultivars)


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RE: Why doesn't every nursery in the country sell.....

  • Posted by mxk3 z5b/6 MI (My Page) on
    Thu, Jun 19, 14 at 18:50

Quote: "The whole country seems to be turning into one big homogenized boring package store."

^^ This. Plus, Americans in general are cheap -- don't want to save Ps and Qs anymore for something of high quality or unusual, it's just gimme more at a cheaper price. Hence, the proliferation of places like the Boxes and the Wally Worlds, not to mention the cr*p on the market nowadays (in terms of non-plant materials such as clothes, shoes), as long as it's cheap Americans will buy it, and when it falls apart quickly they just replace it with another cheap (price and quality) item. Why don't people demand quality anymore? Why don't people just pay a little more for a better quality item that will last much longer? I just don't get it. No, it's not really to do with plants, but I think the prevailing attitude in this country is at least in part to blame for the demise of good quality nurseries, and most definitely to blame in larger part for the demise of other types of local businesses. Although, there does seem to be a movement going in my area to shop locally-owned stores/small businesses and purchase products produced in-state -- a sort of local pride movement, if you will. :0)

I think we do have to lead by example. By this I mean two things:
1. You have no right to complain about the demise of local/speciality nurseries if you do not support them (whatever is specific to your area/interest) and choose instead to purchase items at the Boxes or Wally World or Target or wherever.
2. Be an inspiration in terms of plants that you grow. Yea, of course we all have some coneflowers and hosta and stuff like that, the common stuff, and I do think we all need those types of plants to at least some degree. Some plants may not be "unusual" to us here on the forum and are actually downright common to us, but to our friends, family, and neighbors who have never seen a brunnera or a bergenia or a rugosa rose or an anemone or a bloodroot or a winterberry holly, whatever - the plants that are not commonly grown in home gardens in your circle - less commonly grown plants *are* new and different to those who don't have them and spur questions and interest! Especially native plants -- how easy can you get, yet so many people are clueless when it comes to natives.

Ok, ranting (uh...whining) over -- now I need to go google Spigelia.


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RE: Why doesn't every nursery in the country sell.....

I'll have to try spigelia again. Planted one about 12 years ago, but it didn't survive. After that I've been passing when I stumble upon it. Hearing the above testimony puts it back on my list for a second try.


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RE: Why doesn't every nursery in the country sell.....

I have to agree with the comments above. I know in my neighborhood, I'm one of the only gardeners. Most people have a few petunias or a single hosta in front of the mailbox.

So, if there are no gardeners, a nursery is going to find it tough to stay in business.


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RE: Why doesn't every nursery in the country sell.....

  • Posted by dbarron Z6/7 (Oklahoma) (My Page) on
    Thu, Jun 19, 14 at 22:49

Yes, I've noticed a dearth of nicely planted yards that I used to see. In most cases, they're still maintained by little old ladies...and when they get too old to garden (sigh).

It's not as horrid as losing all the nurseries, but losing gardeners is awful too.

I've actually thought of stopping at a couple of houses where the yard has regressed and just ask if A) same owners as last X years and B) if so, may I say I have admired your garden driving by for years.

Would this be appreciated or would it just be painful to someone ?


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RE: Why doesn't every nursery in the country sell.....

Thank you for making me aware of the plant. Lovely and unusual! Fraser's Thimble Farms seems to sell it and it is local-ish.


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RE: Why doesn't every nursery in the country sell.....

A friend of mine has a Spigelia (with the yellow tops) growing in quite dry soil. Mine is in nearly full sun, though the soil is relatively moist. I never, ever water it, even through heatwaves in the 90s. I did take two seedlings and put them in two separate dry areas, though with afternoon shade. We'll see how they do.


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RE: Why doesn't every nursery in the country sell.....

feh - yet another unreachable plant. I will say that, as long as seed or mail order is OK for you, there is no dearth of variety in the UK.....but, for the past 3 years, I return from garden centre visits (for potting mix, string, netting etc. with not a single plant - either because I have had them, don't want them, inappropriate for my style of gardening.....and I never see anything unusual, innovative, interesting.
So yep, seeds have been my saviour....but only to a point since I am getting less and less impressed by the viability of much commercial seed and the amount in each packet (I was sold 8 thalictrum seeds!). Mail order is a crap shoot at best - I bought a fabulous ampelopsis (yeah, I know....but it is a rariety in the UK) and a couple of rubbish mertensias. There are numerous small nurseries but we whine at the idea of driving 30 miles here in the UK when petrol is ridiculously expensive, our roads are rubbish and we just do not have a culture of driving miles for a carry-out. Generally, I buy fully grown plants because it is a long wait to sow from seeds in order to raise my own seeds to sow in quantity (I want drifts of 30-40 thalictrums) and waiting 4-5 years for martagon lilies or sprengeri tulips (both sold in packets of 10 seeds) to set enough seed for these to grow throughout the woodlands is a 10 year operation....and at 58, time is not on my side for this sort of waiting game (although trees are an exception).
Tough for nurseries but my solution is rather more DIY - seed swaps, cuttings exchanges and networking between similarly obsessed garden mates(are you here Wantonamara, Tex?).
As for a lack of interest in gardening....I absolutely disagree - it is huge in the UK - always has been and probably always will be. Certain types of gardening cycle in and out of fashion -it is all veggies and grow your own at present, hence the paucity of 'difficult' perennials when 6 packs of lettuce and cabbage packs are raised and sold in the millions. Moreover, small nurseries will never compete with the Dutch....but we are flexible and able to respond to a market with speed, growing special, rare, interesting plants - I am certainly hoping to sell own root roses (not a single source anywhere in the UK) amongst other plants when our woodland stock beds are up and running (although it really only pays for my garden hobby...while my labour is what brings home the bacon).
But anyway, back to spigelia - seemingly impossible to buy either seed or plants here in the UK - anyone suggest seed sources which will ship to UK? (because I am a sucker for the new and interesting....as well as an outrageous plant snob.
Footnote - my asclepia seeds arrived from Monarch Watch this week - true, no monarchs in the UK but I am all for diversity and life WILL find a way.


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RE: Why doesn't every nursery in the country sell.....

Probably for the reason that nor EVERY nursery in the country sells ocotillo, creosote, and mesquite.

I'd love it of the Phoenix nurseries stopped selling azaleas ... they die in months.


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RE: Why doesn't every nursery in the country sell.....

Campanula, I think the mentality is very different over by you. People in the US want instant gratification and most aren't willing to work at gardening.

I can't tell you the number of people at my office who tell me they have a black thumb. I always respond "no such thing. You just need to be willing to amend your soil and chose the correct plants for your site". The vast majority have no interest.


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RE: Why doesn't every nursery in the country sell.....

It is true that every year nurseries disappear, both of them in the two towns closest to me. All is not lost though, I spent Sunday traveling the 60 miles to Annies for my yearly buying of unusual plants. Twenty, four inch plants, no annuals, cost about $ 130. I am able to pick out the plants, all in prime condition, grown in the open air, no greenhouse. I have potted them all up into gallons to grow them on. Annie experiments with species that never show up in her catalogs, and makes them available at the nursery. They may fail to prosper for me, but at least I got to try them. Al


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RE: Why doesn't every nursery in the country sell.....

I grew this plant for a few years but it died out . From what I've seen about it, it seems to want 'moist but well drained' soil. I can provide one or the other of those, but both at the same time is not so easy to find here! It was indeed pretty and, if I ever run across one again, I might try it in another location. I can't remember where I got the first ones from.... Where did you get yours Rouge?


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RE: Why doesn't every nursery in the country sell.....

camp---I was thinking the same thing about the # of people interested in gardening. Seems there is a lot more interest but its very different than it used to be. In the olden days people planted flowers from seed every spring like a ritual, had vegetable gardens that they roto-tilled, a lawn full of clover, dandelions, grass etc that they mowed themselves and a few common shrubs like Bridal Veil Spirea, Rose of Sharon, Lilac, Arborvitae, a Rose'bush' and stuff like that. Everyone grew iris'es. People where simpler and satisfied with less choice or novelty but most did their own yard work or property maintenance. They weren't into taking things out and replanting or trying to "Keep up with the Jones's" or "Puttin' on the Dog" nor did they use phrases like "Curb Appeal". They just gardened. Buying new plants was not a season long activity.

Nowadays the choices are vast compared to the olden days. People now spray their lawns & irrigate for perfect expanses of perfect deep green, hire lawn crews, landscapers etc. The do it yourselfers are out there doing the same thing but its much different than it used to be. Judging by the yards I see and the #'s of folks at the local nursery's, there are more into gardening than there used to be and they demand more choices, the focus has changed dramatically.

I have some old Better Homes and Garden's magazines. There used to be a monthly gardening 'blog' called 'Diary of a Plain Dirt Gardener'. If you read these you get a real sense of how differently we now approach gardening. This was before the era of the Gated Community, back in the day of farms, simple neighborhoods and vegetable gardeners. Most gardening was strictly local, mostly you bought seeds, you planted them.

The latest nursery closure here was a place called Horn's Seed. They'd been there since 1927. They had one of those huge antique seed cabinet things with the little drawers that had seed labels & old fashioned pictures of the variety on each drawer, you could get a real good idea what was available back then just looking at this huge wall sized cabinet, and they still sold seed by the pound there. The place had its own smell, I'd know I was in there if I was blindfolded. Over the years they added more sq. ft and a nursery. The loss of this nursery was downright painful, an occasion for grief.

Here is a link that might be useful: http://myplace.frontier.com/~dok97/


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RE: Why doesn't every nursery in the country sell.....

I think those of us in SE Michigan are fairly fortunate in terms of nurseries. I'm not saying there are many who carry a wide variety of very rare plants, but quite a few with a decent selection.

Just yesterday I pulled in my garage and realized a neighbor, walking her dog, was standing in the street waiting for me to get out of the car. She said "I'm so glad I caught you - what IS that?" She was pointing at my Persicaria Polymorpha.

She wants to get one, and I was able to give her the names of a couple places fairly close by that I'm pretty sure will have it in gallons. If not, she can always run out to Arrowhead Alpines for it.

I get that a lot of people just want simple and shop on a budget. They have different hobbies, expertise in different areas, and maybe different needs too. I'm purposely not a wine snob. I'd rather buy my wine at Trader Joe's and spend my $ on plants. I have friends who are the opposite.

But I love being outside. I love the variety of garden work...from wandering through with my coffee in the morning (which inevitably leads to a little weeding) to the use-every-ounce-of-strength and then some jobs. I love the exercise, the creativity (even though I'm not creatively gifted), the surprises of today and investing in the garden's tomorrow.

As I type this, I hear the dull vibration of a hummer at the window feeder, and the happy call of a pair of wrens with the chirp of their babies in the background. There are orioles at the jelly feeder and rose breasted grosbeaks eating sunflower seeds. I feel blessed. Some people would feel burdened. Different strokes.

This post was edited by ruth_mi on Fri, Jun 20, 14 at 15:25


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RE: Why doesn't every nursery in the country sell.....

  • Posted by mxk3 z5b/6 MI (My Page) on
    Fri, Jun 20, 14 at 17:12

Oh yes Ruth - we sure are fortunate here in SE Michigan, we've got some *great* nurseries around here!


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RE: Why doesn't every nursery in the country sell.....

I'm in N Mexico where there are several good nurseries, at least good for what I want. But all of the nurseries, good, bad or indifferent, sell plants which must be in demand - bedding annuals, completely unsuitable shrubs and perennials, fussy demanding groundcovers and vines. I don't see much gardening around me, beyond the standard meatball juniper and containers of petunias. So where are most of the plants going?

The main gardening interest is growing vegetables and fruit. I went on a gardening tour a couple of weeks ago. The high point of the tour was a vegetable garden - there were dozens of people hovering over the raised beds of tomatoes, onions, garlic etc. The owner was there, proudly pointing out his compost bins and irrigation system. I was more interested in the yellow-flowered buddleia about which he knew nothing. (It's buddleia x weyeriana for anyone who's interested.)

Oddly enough, the commercial landscaping firms seem to know their stuff. What I see in the city and in parking lots are tough xeric plants, low maintenance native grasses, shrubs and perennials. After a while you become blase - just another desert willow or hesperaloe or Karl Foerster or yucca elata. I've learnt a lot about what does well here from watching what the landscapers install.

I shop a lot at a wholesale nursery which sells to the public if you pay a membership fee. I was trying to find a shrub somewhere in the back of their vast lot, where they hold plants for commercial customers. I was struck by what was in these big lots - ribes aureum, several kinds of mountain mahogany, lots of salvia greggii, muhly Regal Mist and Karl Foerster by the hundred, caryopteris and three-leaf sumac and hesperaloe. These are all exactly what I have or want. Not an azalea or hydrangea or hybrid tea rose in sight.

I'm happy to say there is no spigelia for sale here where it would turn to a crispy critter in no time flat. I grew it when I lived in the Midwest and had lots of shade, but I remember absolutely nothing about it. But I have a tasty buddleia x weyeriana Honeycomb to show you if you want to see.

Cheryl


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RE: Why doesn't every nursery in the country sell.....

Cheryl, I planted that yellow blooming Buddleia last year but it didn't winter over. I think it was my fault for trimming it back too early though because after I trimmed it down it was leafing out at the base and then died after we had a really cold late cold snap. We don't usually get those that late or that severe so I blundered this year. Buddleia do well here during average rainfall years (whatever that is) but you have to really watch them and do a lot of extra watering in the dry years (you know, the "abnormal" years we get periodically like clockwork, kaw--kaw)

I don't have to tell you I am livid green with enviousness of your local horticulturally cool plant choices. Thats plain not fair. In fact I find it downright disgusting to think that you can just hop in your car and buy such wonderful plants right there locally, not to mention the ones growing right on the sides of the road under that deep azure blue sky.

If you ever stumble across and actually buy one of those Q. Turbinella desert live oaks with the gorgeous blue leaves, I will probably die right there on the spot of a fit of jealousy.

I keep wracking my brain trying to remember where I have seen the Spegelia. I recognized it instantly because I thought the flowers look plastic, thats not an insult, its just that they are weird and thick looking but I can't recall where it was. Its driving me nuts. Maybe it was a book on natives?


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RE: Why doesn't every nursery in the country sell.....

Here is one of my two as of yesterday:

They didn't show themselves until late May and even now they are only a foot tall and less than 6" wide.

('woody' I will try to pick one up for you in my travels. It would do wonderfully on your property)


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RE: Why doesn't every nursery in the country sell.....

Tex, if I do find q. turbinella, you'll be the first to know! I just found out about another nursery owned by one of the pueblos. They grow everything right here (so they say) so plants should adapt readily. They are supplying Plants of the Southwest with starter plants.

You aren't jinxing my buddleia are you? I plan to baby it well.

I planted spigelia when I lived in the Midwest because it has such an exotic flower. It's like many other bog plants which I also tried with lush foliage and sometimes bizarre blooms, but it needs consistently moist conditions which isn't easy. In the end I relied on foliage plants - ligularia, rodgersia, lamium, hosta - for my shade area, with astilbe, aconitum, cimifuga for flowering contrast.

Here I have almost zero shade and near zero moisture so spigelia is just a dream.

Cheryl


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RE: Why doesn't every nursery in the country sell.....

This is the spigelia in my garden in 2008:
Image Hosting by PictureTrail.com

I'm not sure exactly what killed it. It was in the 'wet corner' area so perhaps it got too wet one year - or too dry since that area dries out by late summer (evenly moist but well drained is a rare circumstance here....!) If I find another one (or Rouge finds me one - thanks Rouge....) I think I'd plant it in an area east of the wet corner where there are ferns and trilliums growing with a 'nurse log' which should help keep it moist through the dry times. I think I remember where I got it last time, so I'll have to check if they still carry them - and also whether they have that Bowman's Root that looks interesting!


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RE: Why doesn't every nursery in the country sell.....

My two Spigelia are now opening up:

Here is one of them as of today


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RE: Why doesn't every nursery in the country sell.....

Love it!


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RE: Why doesn't every nursery in the country sell.....

After reading this thread I ordered 3 Spigelia plants from LazySSfarm. Hope they flourish in my zone 6.


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RE: Why doesn't every nursery in the country sell.....

I have known about this plant for years. It is native over a large part of the South where the dirt is acid and rich. Not my environs. It would shrivel up from sun, dryness , iron chlorosis.

I think the GOOD local nurseries are kept in business by the big box's narrow vision of gardening, their fertilizer dependent vegetable starts, their concept of what grows well in Texas is often laughable but the new transplants from other areas fall for it.. Austin and Texas has a thriving garden community that has had a large hand in reshaping the look of gardens. Many many trips to the hills , Northern mexico and Brazil has introduced many species to the trade.


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RE: Why doesn't every nursery in the country sell.....

Quote: "The whole country seems to be turning into one big homogenized boring package store."

Yep that holds true across the board ... not just with nurseries. Look at restaurants and shopping stores. Most all one sees any more are the typical chain stores. Majority of the interesting small/Mom&Pop restaurant & stores have gone extinct.

Many of the northern private nurseries have gone out of business in no small part because of rising energy costs.


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RE: Why doesn't every nursery in the country sell.....

"Why doesn't every nursery sell"
LOL

I find myself asking myself that question a lot on versus plants I grow

There are sooo many AWESOME plants that will thrive here that I would probably have never owned or even known about if it wasn't for the interweb eBay & trade forums like GW etc. & so on
Because I would have NEVER found them at any local nursery

Every plant section in every local nursery or home/garden store is just a carbon copy "How Many People Here Are Old Enough To Know What a Carbon Copy Is (WAS) / LOL>

It's fine if you just want an everyday common run of the mill "Plant" that everyone & their father has & are fine with "4in. Tropical" for an ID
But It Sucks For Collectors & True Plant Enthusiasts

But than again
On the other hand I really can't complain
"Cause I Make a Killing Selling *Rare* Plants On CraigsList
LOL

PEACE...


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RE: Why doesn't every nursery in the country sell.....

If I find another one (or Rouge finds me one)

Look no further 'woody'. I have one in my pocket for you.


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RE: Why doesn't every nursery in the country sell.....

Here is one of my two spigelia in what is likely full bloom. (I am sure it would be more impressive if it received more direct sunlight).

(It does have a bit of a reputation for being a bit iffy returning in the spring depending on your zone but I do encourage you to give it a try. My two had no problem surviving last year's Polar Vortex ;). (Planting nearer a foundation wall will definitely help.))


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