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Very impressed with the Mammoth Mum series

Posted by aachenelf z5 Mpls, MN (My Page) on
Wed, Aug 28, 13 at 12:38

First a little background on my mum growing:

Over the years, all my mums were purchased as rooted cuttings from a Minnesota grower and I believe most (if not all) were developed at the University of Minnesota, so I haven't had many issues with winter survival. My biggest mistake however, was trying to grow them in beds facing SW which is the front of my house. Yes, they grew, they bloomed, they survived the winter, but that intense afternoon sun and heat simply fried them. So, this spring I moved all of them to the beds with a SE orientation and the difference has been pretty remarkable. My mums should be spectacular this fall (knock on wood).

One of the mums I moved was 'Coral Daisy' from the Mammoth Mum series. Again, developed at the U of M. There's a link at the bottom with some more info about these mums and their breeding program. From a couple of tiny sprigs transplanted in May, this plant is now 34 inches across, about 15 inches tall and pretty much a perfect mount. I never pinched it. I think I fertilized it once. It's listed as hardy to minus 30-35 F.

When I purchased this plant, the grower stated from a rooted cutting, in the second year, expect a plant 3-4 feet across which I totally believe now. From the current state of bud development, it looks like this one won't be blooming for about a month, so hopefully our current heat wave should be history. If you're looking for mums to order next year, you might want to put this one on your list. I'm pretty impressed with it.

Here's my mum today:

Kevin

Here is a link that might be useful: U of M


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Very impressed with the Mammoth Mum series

It looks so healthy, so dense. Of course you will post pictures when it is in full bloom please.

As you had mentioned, the University of Minnesota has done quality breeding to give very hardy mum plants.

(In Canada there is the Morden Research Centre in Manitoba,)


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RE: Very impressed with the Mammoth Mum series

I have the same experience as you and will be impressed if they come up next years. I will hold my opinion until then. Now, however they are spectacular!


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I would love to have mums that come back for me. I've tried many that say they will winter over in my zone and not had much luck. I've switched to asters for fall flowers, but I'd like to have some mums thrown into the mix. Please let us know how this does for you.


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RE: Very impressed with the Mammoth Mum series

Kevin, that's beautiful - such a nice shape and so dense, and no pinching? Did I read right - the plant in the photo was planted as a sprig this past May (2013)?? Or if you mean that is when you transplanted it, how long did you have it before transplanting?

I'll have to check out your link. I've become very discouraged with mums. They bud up so early and if I pinch them back they get ratty and look like crap anyway. This year I didn't pinch any and let them bloom in July, but the plants didn't do well anyway. Maybe the Mammoth series is an option to consider.

Thanks!
Dee


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RE: Very impressed with the Mammoth Mum series

Ooh I want some of those!


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Looks like I have one of these, after reading the information on the link. And I've had it a long time. It is the Dark Bronze Daisy Mammoth Mum, purchased in 2005. It bloomed in the fall of 2005 and we sold the house, and it came along with us, planted at out new home in August of 2006. It's been going strong ever since. I have compliments on it every fall.

In 2005, it was sold under the "My Favorite Mum" name. I had purchased two - the Dk Bronze Daisy, and a white one, that I don't remember the name of. The white one did not live through the move, unfortunately. That August was down-right brutal - high humidity, temps in the 90's, and no rain for weeks. I was happy that I didn't loose more plants than I did. But the DB Daisy Mum is a very hardy plant and one that I look forward to seeing every fall. If I can remember, I'll post a picture of it when it's in bloom.

Linda


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I'm looking forward to seeing the pictures, I saw a few pictures of the mammoths last fall and came pretty close to buying a couple this spring but the plant budget shifted elsewhere.... It's hard to focus on fall flowers when all the pastels and bright spring colors are calling.


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I'm looking forward to seeing the pictures, I saw a few pictures of the mammoths last fall and came pretty close to buying a couple this spring but the plant budget shifted elsewhere.... It's hard to focus on fall flowers when all the pastels and bright spring colors are calling.


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If I add any mums it'll be in spring. My long-term track record with "hardy mums" is discouraging (great plants for growers, since most people have to buy them every year).

And that includes "Matchsticks" which decided not to show up this spring.

On the other hand, perennial asters have done well, including the seed-grown Benary's mix now in its second year, 3-4 feet tall (even after being cut back by half earlier this summer), foliage in excellent shape and full of buds.


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linlily - Good to hear you've tried some of the other colors and have liked them. So far, there doesn't seem to be a huge selection of MM colors, but I will check them out next spring when I place another order from my grower. First though, I have to figure out if I really have room for more of these. It kind of scares me to think how large this one will be next year.

Dee - No, I did NO pinching at all. None. In fact, I never got around to pinching any of my mums this year. I think I may regret that because most are taller than I had wanted and might be susceptible to storms with nasty winds.

I did have this one last year, but in the crappy location it was growing it didn't do much. When I transplanted it this spring, there was very little to work with - only a couple of sprigs. I was wondering if it would even make it.

I'm convinced for me at least, growing mums is all about location, location, location. Last summer was brutal - both heat and drought. This year we're back in the drought and are just coming out of a very extended bout of heat. The mums look great. Last year they didn't.

You know, even the rooted cuttings of other mums (not Mammoth) I purchased this spring are full sized plants already. Not as large as this one, but a good 15 inches across for the most part. At $2.25 each, they were money well spent.

Kevin


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My Dk Bronze Daisy mum is at the corner of a bed next to a paved - black - driveway. This is also a mixed bed and it's next to lots of daylilies. Probably not the best place. It gets snow thrown on it over the winter, which might be a good thing though.

I wanted to mention that this is not a really large plant. It's habit is more like a cushion mum. I do not and never have had to pinch it. At most, I'd say it's about 14 inches tall. And it never falls over, even in full bloom.

Another mum that I can recommend is "Beth," which I have found out is a Yoder Mum. I received it in a trade about 4 years ago. I have a daughter named Beth - Elizabeth, so I'm always trying to pick up flowers with her name. Lovely color and habit. It is already starting to open here. And it seems very hardy.

I have one of those tiny - both plant and flowerwise- pom pom mums that came from my parents home. I brought pieces of it here when we sold their home after they both passed away. It's probably from the mid 1960's. Now that's hardy! It starts out a creamy white and as it ages, it turns a pinkish red on the top of the blooms. Very cute. It's been blooming for a few weeks already. And if I get around to dead heading it, it will rebloom before frost.

I don't seem to have much luck with asters. I purchased one in full bloom when we moved here. It was called a viking name or something similar. It lasted 2 years and didn't come back. My neighbor gave me some of her Purple Dome. It did all right for a couple of years but it became really tall and lost all of the leaves on the bottom half of the plant. They turned brown and crispy. Not very nice to look at. I needed the room for something else so I shovel pruned it. But, I would add more mums anytime. I love them for the color they provide the beds this time of year. They are inexpensive so that even if they don't return, you get several weeks of enjoyment from them as an annual.

Linda


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While I don't grow any of the Mammoth series (I was unaware of their existence until this thread), I do grow a selection of cold hardy mums of the old-fashioned Korean type. These are daisy-flowered chrysanthemums sold under cultivar names like Will's Wonderful, Sheffield, Clara Curtis, Mary Stoker, etc. I also have semi-double Mei-Kyo and its sports in bronze and white. Also the very tall, very late blooming, very lovely and very double Emperor of China.

I discovered and planted these mums in late summer (August) of last year. 95% returned this spring after a brutal winter with no snow cover and endless freeze/thaw cycles, all after a long fall with no rain. They continue to look healthy and some, like Will's Wonderful and Emperor of China, do not even appear to be forming buds yet.

There is also a series of hardy daisy-flowered mums called the Global Warming series. These are selected to bloom very late into fall to provide a continued food source for pollinators. I do not grow any of these, but they look interesting.

Chrysanthemums are so delightfully old-fashioned. It seems people are lured into buying the greenhouse-raised decorative mums for fall display yet no emphasis is given to the truly hardy types. It could be a matter of individual taste as well. I like my mums to be tall and loose, which is better for intermingling in a crowded garden space.


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ispahan

I agree the old fashioned ones like Clara Curtis are wonderful. I've had that one for years and years and in fact, it's one I remember from my grandmothers garden in zone 3b in MN. That's one of the main reasons I initially bought it. Aren't the majority of these Dendranthema?

I've always had a hard time thinking of this one as a mum although the foliage is very mum-like - just taller an airier. For me it's always been this pink-daisy-like plant adored by butterflies that blooms at the near the end of the season. Usually mine is pretty tall and has a tendency to flop somewhat in windy conditions, but I really don't mind. The flowers more than make up for that one annoyance.

This year I added Bolero, Harmony and Cambodian Queen. All of them look more like traditional mums - very compact, but strong growers - and I think they will be pretty late to bloom. I hope they prove to be as hardy and carefree as Clara Curtis.

Kevin


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Am I wrong in thinking that those older mums - Clara Curtis, Sheffield, etc. - are somewhat aggressive? I thought I had heard/read that once and so have been hesitant to put them in the garden.

I don't necessarily need my mums to be compact little mounds, but I'm not a big enthusiast of the huge sprawling ones either. I like them somewhere in between. I was given a clump of an old NOID orange mum which I always admired in a friend's garden, but I cut mine back way more than she does. She likes the big sprawly look. I don't mind big, but in my already-untidy garden, sprawly just adds to the look of messiness, IMO.

Dee


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Dee - I wouldn't call Clara Curtis aggressive - maybe robust, very hardy, but it certainly doesn't get out of control in a flash.

It does need its space however. A 10 inch clump in early spring can easily occupy a 3 foot across space by the time it blooms. It also spread my those shorter, underground runners, so you don't want to plant anything too close or you'll end up with Clara growing right in the middle of some other plant. Regular division - like every couple of years - can easily keep in under control.

Not to scare you away for this one any more than I probably have, it also has a tendency to self-sow pretty regularly if you don't cut the flowers off when they're done.

Kevin


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Gorgeous pic of Clara Curtis, Kevin! Mine hasn't even started blooming yet but it is full of almost mature buds.

All of mine were planted late last summer, but so far none appear to be aggressive spreaders.

I think I prefer the taller, lankier types mainly because my small garden is so intensely planted that I have no other option. A bushier, more compact type would either smother out its neighbors or be smothered itself. These older types don't seem to mind weaving up through neighboring plants to survive. That way, they stay relatively unobtrusive until they bloom and add to the riotous cottage look I tend to maintain.

I have read they can self seed after falls warm and long enough to ripen seed. Did you ever let any seedlings grow up? Any interesting finds?


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Thanks, Kevin (and ispahan as well) for that further info on the spreadability of these mums. I'm revamping a lot of things in my garden in the fall and spring, so maybe I'll finally include one of these older mums. I'll look into some of the others you mentioned, especially since it seems like they are later bloomers.

Thanks!
Dee


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ispahan - I should have mentioned that photo was from last year. Mine is currently only showing some color in the buds, so it will be late this year. Sometimes this one blooms in August, but it seems almost impossible to figure out what triggers an early blooming vs. a later blooming. It also looks like it will be much shorter this year - maybe 2 feet tall - which is very unusual. I certainly watered it this year. Maybe the late start to summer?

No, I have never allowed a seedling to stay in place. I probably should just to see what happens.

Kevin


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RE: Very impressed with the Mammoth Mum series

OK, here's my Mammoth Coral Daisy in bloom. I don't think it's at its peak yet, but it still looks nice.

And as long as I'm posting mum photos, here's another one I really like - Peach Centerpiece. I've had this one for several years and have divided it many times. It's kind of nice having a mum with larger flowers - around 3 inches - instead of the small flowered cushion or daisy type flowers. This isn't from the Mammoth series.

Kevin


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Wow, Kevin, very nice. I especially love the Peach Centerpiece. I love the bloom form and the color. I like the way the bloom seems to change color as it goes through stages. This would go nicely in my new orange/yellow/red bed, which is where I also put the NOID orange mum from a friend I mentioned above.

Can you give a little more info on this one - did you pinch, height, etc.?

Thank you for the photos!
Dee


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Thanks Dee

The Peach C grows about 24 inches tall and I did pinch it once which didn't seem to reduce its height, it just made it a bit bushier. It's my earliest mum to bloom and the grower lists the bloom time as Sept 5 which is pretty accurate.

You're right about the color change. That's one thing I really like about it, but the flowers also change shape too as they age. It's kind of hard to describe, but they almost get spiny looking which is kind of cool. It stays nice looking for a very long time.

I took a closer look at the flowers and was wrong about their width. They're really more like 4 inches across instead of the 3 inches. Nice long stems make for a good cut flower too. This one also comes in a lavender form called 'Centerpiece'. I think my grower also had another introduction this past spring, but I don't remember the color.

Kevin


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Thanks Kevin. I'm definitely going to look into this. Wish I had known about it when I was selling bouquets - this would have been gorgeous in a fall bouquet!

Dee


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Yeah..... I need that.
I noticed you never named your supplier. Are they local? I'm liable to spend the whole weekend searching online for a springtime source for these. Thanks a lot.


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Another "thank you" here, Kevin. I need another new plant like I need a hole in my head. But, I have to have Peach Centerpiece. I love it! One year, a LONG time ago, I tried growing mums from seeds and I grew a spider mum that I just loved. The only problem I had with it was that it set buds late and didn't open until well after the first frost here, and that is a problem. I seldom got to see the flowers.

I just checked and Garden Harvest Supply sells Peach Centerpiece and suggests you pre-order them in December. I have purchased from GHS and have been very pleased with their plants. Everything I bought from them is still growing here and doing well.

Linda


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kato

The link to my source is below. I would suggest you send them a message and have them add you to their mailing list. In the spring they'll send out a brochure with their listings. I don't think you can order online. You'll have to do it the old-fashioned way by sending in an order form. Just so you're aware, they send rooted cuttings which seems kind of lame, but they really do develop into nice-sized blooming plants by fall. Plus, they are cheap at $2.50 each.

Linda

I'm happy to be tempting you with yet another plant!

I know what you mean about some plants blooming too late. That's one nice thing about this website, they give you an estimated time for first blooms. While you're at it, check out their football mums. I haven't grown any of those yet, but I might next spring.

Kevin

Here is a link that might be useful: Mums


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RE: Very impressed with the Mammoth Mum series

Kevin, thanks so much for the website. I am definitely going to order some ---- mums from MN sounds like they should be hardy enough for NW IL.

I said I would never try mums again but I love them so much so I think this vendor might be the answer!


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Linda add me to the list of those wowed by your Peach Centerpiece photo. Thanks for the link, I've emailed them my info.
:)


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Thanks for the link, you must have posted it once before since it looks familiar, shame on me for losing it!
There are so many cool varieties listed, I forgot how nice mums could be! I think I just got used to seeing the pots at the box stores and fell in to a rut. Maybe it's time for a new plant obsession?.... might have to put the dahlias on hold for a year or two.


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Just checked out your link, Kevin and I'm in love. Now...what can I take out to make room for a few more mums????

Linda


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RE: Very impressed with the Mammoth Mum series

Happy to hear you're happy with what you see on the website.

One thing I've noticed though, is I don't find their photos very helpful. I tend to go by the written descriptions. I just find them more useful if I'm looking for particular colors.

Another thing I love about ordering mums: You look at the photos in winter, make your decisions, place your order, get your plants in the spring and then totally forget about what they're suppose to look when they bloom. It's one big surprise when the first flowers open in the fall. Kind of a nice way to end the season.

Right now, I have 17 varieties of mums and I'm sure I'll add a few more next year. I try to limit myself to about 6 new ones per year. Eventually I'll run out of room, but not yet.

I'll try to remember to post a few more photos of especially nice ones when they bloom. 2 you should consider are 'Cameo' if you like a nice clear pink and 'Dolliette' which is a stunning red and yellow combo.

Kevin


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17! Wow, your yard must be very colorful in the fall!

You should make a post to this thread in January or February, Kevin, to remind us all to do some mum shopping, lol!

:)
Dee


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Sorry Kevin I got your name wrong!
Do you have any asters? I've got about six of them and three of them look awful. They were gorgeous the first year and for the next two they have just not done well. Spindly, leggy, brownish blooms. I'm not sure what I've done wrong with them. We had a good year with perfect amounts of sun and rain. Everything else in the garden looks great. My mums bloomed early and I deadheaded them and am getting more bloom now. Just those darned asters look bad.


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My peach centerpiece never ever looked like yours Kevin. The color was so grayed it was ugly. They(mfg) told me it was the heat here in southwest Ks.


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jackie - I only have 3-4 fall asters I think. Some do better for me than others and over the years I've eliminated the ones that just didn't perform well. I don't know what could be causing your problems because it sounds like they've gotten plenty of water. Lack of consistent moisture seems to cause the most problems in my experience. Unless they need dividing? I divide mine about every 3 years or they get too crowded.

flowergirl - I bet the heat was the issue. I moved all my mums this year from the SW side of my house where it was too blasted hot and they've done sooooooo much better.


Kevin


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RE: Very impressed with the Mammoth Mum series

Have any of you tried the igloo series of mums? Mine have came back 3 years in a row and we planted them in the fall, both here and at church.


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RE: Very impressed with the Mammoth Mum series

Thanks for responding Kevin. I'm going to move the three asters that aren't doing well. It may be a crowding issue. I'll see if they do better in another area of the garden.


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RE: Very impressed with the Mammoth Mum series

I was out taking some photos of my mums and thought an update on the Mammoth Coral might be interesting for some to see. Here's how it looks now:

The color has faded and the flowers are in decline when viewed close up, but from a distance I really like it. It's is a nice break from all the traditional mum colors we normally expect this time of year.

Kevin


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Sandy 0225, where did you get Igloo Mums? I bought a reddish one from Park Seed a few years ago and it's a great plant. I've looking for a yellow Igloo but can't find anywhere.


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Kevin that's gorgeous! I love the shades of color.


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Kevin, you are a troublemaker. Now I've got to "do" mums again! Aaarrgh!


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jackie - Thank you. Yes, I'm very pleased with this change in color

patann - Oh yes I am and proud of it! I think I'm totally smitten with the mum bug this year. I still have quite a few which haven't even opened yet and other in the process of opening, so my garden is still really, really pretty despite the lateness of the season. I'll do another thread hopefully soon with some of my other favorites. I picked up a couple really outstanding varieties this year.

Kevin


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Earlier I was outside harvesting a big bouquet of "will's wonderful"
I have a golden straw colored one, a orange to gold, one that is going to be deep pinky-red, and in November, dear Sheffield Pink.
If I get home early enough tomorrow, I'll take some pictures. Maybe you'll help me remember the names.


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Aachenelf ~ surfing tonight and so glad I found your post and link. 'Minnruby' was my favorite red years ago. Never thought I'd find it again. Thank You.


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I am envious Kevin. Your pictures show perfectly "perfect Mums".

I have only one mum ("Matchstick"). It doesnt reach its full potential as I don't have it in enough sun.


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iris - I know Minnruby was on my wish list at one point. I'll have to check it out again. I'm in need of a good red.

rouge - Thank you. I was wondering if you grew any mums, but you're correct. They do need good sun.

Kevin


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Do you use a support for your Mammoth Mums? My red one looks great until full bloom then splays somewhat. Also 'Pink Twilight' seems to have a looser habit. A friend gave me a division of her coral one this spring.


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mnwsgal - No, I don't use any support for this one. This is one plant I can say with 100% certainty does not flop - never ever, under any conditions of wind or rain. I was deadheading this one over the weekend and noticed the stems which support the flowers are almost like little tree branches - very thick, woody and strong.

Kevin


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Kevin wrote:

rouge - Thank you. I was wondering if you grew any mums, but you're correct. They do need good sun.

It has been buggin' me that I have no space in full sun for one of your wonderful mums. They are spectacular. And then today while out raking leaves near what we call our "rose garden" it hit me. This plot has too much color in July and August but not enough in the fall. So I am going to remove 2 "Oso Easy Paprika Roses" and replace them with 2 of your MUMS! Although these roses are no maintenance, there really isnt enough room for them where they are. These MUMS, although MAMMOTH will not be as tall and so the lesser height will also help this garden. I'm excited.

Thanks again Kevin for your post and pictures.


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It's good to see your mums post Kevin, and the photos. I've just always bought whatever they had at the BBstore marked hardy garden mum, and they seem to overwinter fine, the red ones more hardy than the yellows or purples. The frost doesn't phase them when they bloom, but this year Atlas hit with 3 ft of snow and the mums now look like flat colorful explosions in two dimensions only across the ground. At the other house the red one I had lived a long time with no care, but finally died of not being divided. At my new house I already have dividing the mums on my list of spring jobs. They are really worth it for their bright late color.

The link to the website is good with lots of description. Happy shopping everyone!


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Happy you enjoyed them.

It's hard for me to believe it's already November and most of the mums are still looking good. In fact, I just picked some for inside the house. Some are starting to look a pick shaggy when viewed up close, so they don't work for picking, but they still are very colorful in the garden. No really cold weather in the forecast either, so this is really turning into a nice extended fall.

Kevin


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Yes, they grew, they bloomed, they survived the winter, but that intense afternoon sun and heat simply fried them.

I wouldn't have guessed this Kevin as I was under the impression that Mums thrived on full sun and were good re water requirements.


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Yes, they grew, they bloomed, they survived the winter, but that intense afternoon sun and heat simply fried them.

I wouldn't have guessed this Kevin as I was under the impression that Mums thrived on full sun and were good re water requirements.


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I ordered the MM's from the site in MN and can't wait to get them in the ground. The space I have planned is in full sun though. I hope that won't be a problem. In fact, maybe I will put some on the north side of the house around some large peonies so I have something to bloom after the peonies.

It just seems like summer was too short this year. Yes, I am old and time is flying!


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I don't want to give the wrong impression. Mums do need as much sun as possible, but the SW side of my house just doesn't work for a lot of plants because of the heat buildup. There must be something about my house and property that makes it so inhospitable to a lot of plants. I would definitely not plant these in any kind of shade.

Kevin


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Ryseryse did you order this year already? I was waiting for a list or an email.... I guess their ordering process doesn't change much year to year so could probably do it now...


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RE: Very impressed with the Mammoth Mum series

If you want to see if any new varieties are offered in the spring, it might be best to wait until you get their brochure in the mail. Most years, it's the same list, but every once in a while there is something new.

Kevin


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RE: Very impressed with the Mammoth Mum series

Thanks, I signed up for the mailing and was wondering if I missed it.


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RE: Very impressed with the Mammoth Mum series

If you want to see if any new varieties are offered in the spring, it might be best to wait until you get their brochure in the mail. Most years, it's the same list, but every once in a while there is something new.

Kevin


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These extra hardy, special 'mums' are not easy to source where I am located.

I think that there is no doubt that many gardeners and most homeowners think of 'mums' as those plants that appear en masse in late summer at grocery and big box stores.

This post was edited by rouge21 on Wed, Dec 4, 13 at 17:51


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RE: Very impressed with the Mammoth Mum series

This year I added Bolero, Harmony and Cambodian Queen

I think Bol. and Harm. are mums from breeder Rika Bronsther. (I have her "Matchstick" and it has never done very well).

Kevin, can you tell me now these ones did in your garden this past fall? I do realize that this is their first year in the ground but did you see enough performance to keep you happy?


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rouge

I mentioned both with photos in my other mum thread (link below). I was so impressed with both, I will certainly be searching for more by Rika this spring. Without a doubt, 'Bolero' made my top 5 favorite plants of the year. 'Harmony' was very similar in appearance, but bloomed much later, so that's kind of a negative in my book, but it was certainly very nice. Both were purchased from Bluestone and came in 3 inch pots. By the time they bloomed, they were easily over 2 feet across.

If I remember correctly, both were largely unaffected by temps in the low 20's and didn't succumb completely until we reached the teens.

Kevin

Here is a link that might be useful: Mums


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Maybe one advantage of the Mammoth series of mums over "Rika's" plants are that the Minnesota bred chrysanthemums are even hardier i.e. listed as good to even a zone 3 (whereas "Rika's" are shown as zone 5).


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See here for more interesting info re chrysanthemums:

Here is a link that might be useful: Trial Report

This post was edited by rouge21 on Tue, Dec 17, 13 at 6:57


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RE: Very impressed with the Mammoth Mum series

rouge - It is interesting to see how these are evaluated across the pond, but I wonder how that translates to our very different climate? I noticed in the report, it was mentioned their trial garden experienced one of the lowest winter temps in recent years: -17 C which equals around 1.4 F. As we all know, that's not considered very cold around here.

I also noticed they mentioned a couple of pest problems I have never heard of. Come to think of it, I can't recall mums in my garden having any issues with pests other than rabbits. Still, an interesting read.

Of the ones awarded in their garden trials, I have one - Ruby Mound. It is a nice plant and for a long time was one of my favorites, but I've discovered others I like better.

Kevin


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RE: Very impressed with the Mammoth Mum series

Kevin, doing a little googling, it appears that many of the 'mums shown in this England evaluation are available here with hardier climate zones listed.

(I do see the Mammoth mums listed)

What I am now realizing after doing more looking is the very great number of varieties in this genus.

I am very much looking forward to planting several chrysanthemums this coming season.


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RE: Very impressed with the Mammoth Mum series

"What I am now realizing after doing more looking is the very great number of varieties in this genus."

I've been thinking the same thing. In fact, I'm starting to realize I really have no idea (yet) of the possibilities.

It's kind of sad to think most people only see the few varieties offered as blooming plants in the fall at their local garden center and settle for that as enough of a selection.

Kevin


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RE: Very impressed with the Mammoth Mum series

Just wondering if anyone has received a brochure yet. I didn't notice any change on their website but wasn't sure if that meant anything or not.... The thermometer has gone above freezing two days in a row and all of a sudden I'm all about growing things and gardens again!


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