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Phlox paniculata

Posted by aftermidnight Z7b V. Island B.C. (My Page) on
Tue, Aug 5, 14 at 13:30

I know not favorites with some but I really like them :). I want to add a few more to the garden, so pictures please.
I have 'Mt. Fujiyama', 'Blue Paradise' (we think) and 'Purple Kiss', I did have more but over the years as I changed my garden beds around they were given away, it seems I have come full circle and want to add more, nice punches of color this time of year.
Here's my latest addition, Yes I know I thought I was finished buying for the summer but honestly I just went to buy a little plant of Greek Oregano and saw this :). I took a picture of the flower before cutting it back.
'Red Caribbean' who said pink and red don't look good together I think this one is a beauty.
Annette

This post was edited by aftermidnight on Wed, Aug 6, 14 at 1:26


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Phlox paniculata

Yesterday:


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RE: Phlox paniculata

SunnyBorders, what a gorgeous border, I'd love some of the cultivar (Phlox) names if you don't mind so I can look them up, see if any of them are available around here.
What other plants do you have planted, it looks like a good mix.

Annette


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RE: Phlox paniculata

THat is so beautiful. The phlox adds so much. Unfortunately, I have had very bad luck with my phlox. I miss it in my garden. Both of the pictures make me wish I could grow it in my garden. Great Job! Beautiful. Lesley


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RE: Phlox paniculata

Annette, our perennials work well for our growing conditions and for the way in which we maintain our garden.

The flower beds have a variety of spring, summer and fall perennials.

The purple phlox in the picture are 'Purple Flame', 'Düsterlohe' (Nicky) and 'Wendy House'. There's a 'Coral Flame'. The shorter pink or pink and white are pinwheel 'Peppermint Twist' (has cherry(?) reversions to 'Candy Floss') and 'Bright Eyes'. The red is 'Starfire' and the shorter white is 'Pina Colada'.

There's also some tall old white and tall old pink No Name phlox.

Re other garden phlox, Annette, think the 'Watermelon Punch', 'Purple Kiss', 'Cosmopolitan' and '(Little) Laura' are currently also looking very nice. I'd always highly recommend 'Nora Leigh' of the variegated garden phlox (for its foliage which remains attractive here until mid October).

Other perennials blooming in that bed, include some daylilies (e.g. 'Awesome Luck'), black-eyed susan 'Goldsturm', purple coneflowers (e.g. 'Double Decker'), globe thistles (e.g. the species, Echinops ritro), persicaria (e.g. 'Firetail'), culver's root (e.g. 'Fascination') and boltonia ('Jim Crockett').

Charlie

This post was edited by SunnyBorders on Tue, Aug 5, 14 at 20:05


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RE: Phlox paniculata

Beautiful!! Mine are blooming now as well but I don't have anywhere near the variety you have. I do grow Blue Paradise & David along with Flamingo, Nora Leigh & Franz Schubert. I love how they light up my mixed perennial beds this time of year.


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RE: Phlox paniculata

Thanks, Lesley.

Of all the summer perennials, I like the garden phlox the best. Think that's because we garden for colour.

Never sure about problems growing garden phlox elsewhere, but obviously our own growing conditions (e.g. sun) are excellent for them. I do pay attention to plant division, adding organic matter to the soil, cutting back as soon as possible and watering (as needed).

Unfortunately this year, for the first time, a few phlox show evidence of overwatering; namely, stems with yellow leaves (the result of hindering the root intake of nutrients).

Charlie


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RE: Phlox paniculata

Thanks GW.

As I'm sure you know, maintaining mixed perennial beds is a juggling act.


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RE: Phlox paniculata

Incredible Charlie. The unnamed "tall old white" phlox is striking.


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Charlie, clearly you done have a woodchuck! LOL! What a stunner of a border. I miss my phlox this year. Our fat woodchuck has just been devouring them. Thanks for sharing such nice eye candy!


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RE: Phlox paniculata

Thanks, Rouge.

Like different heights (at least mostly increasing towards the back).


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Lovely... I wish it would grow for me, but it's either the deer or powdery mildew that inevitably ruins any dreams of brilliant phlox I might entertain... sigh.


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Awesome show of phlox, great colors and really grown well!
Is "red paradise" tall or short? I love the color mix and will keep an eye out for it.... I just don't like the real short ones, and try to stay away from anything under 2 feet tall.
Here's "Nora Leigh" which grows surprisingly well for a variegated plant, and very mildew resistant.


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RE: Phlox

"Blushing shortwood" has real nice bicolored blooms.


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RE: Phlox paniculata

Kato, it's 'Red Caribbean' not Red Paradise, when I realized my mistake I went back and edited my post, my edited post seemed to have disappeared so went back and edited it again, hopefully it will stick this time. 'Red Caribbean' is not a tall variety, mine is about 26". I'm really taken with your 'Blushing Shortwood' another one to add to my to look for list.

Annette


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RE: Phlox paniculata

'kato' , i really like that "Blushing Shortwood"...beautiful colour and large petals..very nice.

This post was edited by rouge21 on Wed, Aug 6, 14 at 17:24


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RE: Phlox paniculata

"Nora Leigh" which grows surprisingly well for a variegated plant, and very mildew resistant.

So many good reports re NL.

Another variegated one to consider is "Shockwave". Very vigorous, very mildew resistant and I think the flower colour goes better with the foliage (as compared to NL).

It blooms quite late. Even as of today my two plants still show no signs of flower buds. But in the meantime the foliage is outstanding. Here the two are as of today.


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RE: Phlox paniculata

'SunnyBorders' et al, what options are there for a healthy phlox with red flowers. I am replacing some plants in a section of garden that has too much pink. So I am kind of mulling over removing some of these pinkies to be replaced with red and white. (I have the white covered with an hydrangea).


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Charlie, what kind of a watering system do you use in your borders, the reason I'm asking is I'm redoing two small perennial beds from scratch this fall, one gets fair amount of sun, the other mostly shade, numerous pots of things sitting in my holding area right now:)
Up to now I've relied on a hand held wand but right now it's sprinklers early morning, we're still in a bit of a heat wave and getting around to everything that needs water with the hand held just isn't happening :(. I've resisted putting in a permanent watering system as I like to switch things around if I don't like the combinations I come up with. It's like musical chairs around here at times LOL.

Annette


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RE: Phlox paniculata

That tall old white phlox is up to 3 3/4 foot in our garden, Rouge.

Thanks, Dogg1967, think powdery mildew can be beaten, if there's the right growing conditions, but deer are another matter.

Thanks, Kato.
That 'Nora Leigh' is very mildew resistant is exactly my experience. Think it's size here also makes it showy.
As per Rouge, really like the look of 'Blushing Shortwood'.
Suspecting it's as dependable as 'Shortwood'.

As per 'Shockwave': Rouge previously put me on to it. It's doing very well here.

Thanks, Rouge. Re reds, as you'd know, not every phlox called "red" is red. Also some are only partly red (e.g. 'Red Caribbean' above).

Do have 'Red Riding Hood', which is currently struggling.
Am going to try moving it.

The best red red to me is 'Starfire'; very attractive, very reliable here. It's supposed to be 2 to 3 foot in height, but some of it is over 4 foot in our garden.

Annette, when we need to water (when there's less than 20 mm of rain in the week), we use a simple back-and-forth sprinkler. For our small back garden, for instance, two locations will cover most of it. We leave the sprinkler on at each location for from an hour to half an hour (viz. deep watering), depending on the amount of rain. We water later in the day (viz. in our climate, less water lost to evaporation).

My friend David Tomlinson (Merlin's Hollow) secures the sprinkler on top of a step ladder, if he needs to water. That way it covers a larger area.

In-ground sprinklers are not supposed to be good for perennials, at least if they are set for the lawn as well. Perennials are best with deep occasional watering (viz. get the roots to grow down).

I'd suspect that being willing to move perennials around to get the best growing conditions for them is, in fact, good gardening practice. True that some perennials move better than others.


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Charlie, I do have a couple of revolving sprinklers, 3' high types, a couple you just stick in the ground and I use the big back and forth sprinkler to water one big bed and two small bed at the same time. It sits on the path between the beds
I never though of plopping it on top of our step ladder, I kind of like that idea, everything gets watered gently from above instead of some plants getting hit sideway.

Annette


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RE: Phlox paniculata

Delete duplicate post.

This post was edited by aftermidnight on Wed, Aug 6, 14 at 16:04


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RE: Phlox paniculata

I forgot that last bit.
David did tell me.
Thanks, Annette

Charlie


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RE: Phlox paniculata

Annette, I hope you don't mind a little thread hijacking, but I was wondering what the opinions are on this red phlox. SunnyB said he has 'starfire' and that's what I think it might be. A little over three feet, darker foliage.... what's your opinion Sunny?


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Not hijacking, I'd like to know too, some more very pretty phlox there. I love it when I have a noid and someone solves the id for me :).

Annette


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RE: Phlox paniculata

Very pretty colours, Kato.

I only have 'Starfire' and 'Red Riding Hood' to compare for "true" reds and I only have one of the latter, though numbers of the former.

I agree with the on-line literature that 'Starfire' has some darkish pigmentation, especially when the leaves open (and (I think) on newer parts of stems). Didn't see this on my one little 'Red Riding Hood'.

My 'Starfire' is certainly taller than 'Red Riding Hood', especially that planted several years ago.

I'd say that 'Red riding Hood' is more red red than 'Starfire', which RHS calls "crimson". I am seeing more yellow in the 'Starfire' flowers than in those of 'Red Riding Hood'.

Not paying enough attention to individual variation, I'm observing :

(1) that 'Starfire' (1937) has coarser and less uniform petal arrangements in the flowers: for instance, the petals seem to overlap more regularly in all the more modern garden phlox I looked at. And the petals, in 'Starfire' sometimes seem jagged at the outer end.

(2) Perhaps associated with it being less reddy red, in the flowers, there's at least sometimes some bluish spots/bumps at the base of the petals in 'Starfire'; didn't see this in the 'Red Riding Hood'.

From the height and the pigmentation you mention Kato, plus the overall look of the flowers (as much as I can make that out) I certainly say that your red phlox are not "Not 'Starfire'".

I don't know of other possibilities (viz. other "red" garden phlox cultivars, their availabilities, etc).

My dear old Mum was an excellent gardener and a far more practical person than I am. If she was pretty certain it was 'Starfire', 'Starfire' it would be (and nobody would be any the wiser).

Kato, my Mum says 'Starfire'!


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Very detailed write-up SB. Thank you.

I don't know of other possibilities (viz. other "red" garden phlox cultivars, their availabilities, etc

Take a look at "Lord Clayton".

Here is a link that might be useful: Lord Clayton


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Lord Clayton, another to put on my want list :).

Annette


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I "think" the one pictured below is 'Peppermint Twist'.

kato_b ... love your photo of 'Blushing Shortwood', I gotta get myself one if I can track it down!

rouge, your 'Shockwave' is rather quite stunning!

This post was edited by twrosz on Thu, Aug 7, 14 at 18:35


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Great combo photo 'twrosz'.

And speaking of Phlox "Peppermint Twist", mine are in full bloom as well. Here are two plants.

PT stays in bloom for a very long time.


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Interesting Rouge.
I looked at the on-line patent information for 'Lord Clayton'.

'Lord Clayton' is compared to only two other phlox; namely, 'Starfire' and then 'Sandra'. I don't know how these two cultivars were chosen for the comparisons, but I'm assuming that they were chosen for being very similar to 'Lord Clayton'. The comparisons are quite minimal.

Re 'Peppermint Twist': It's interesting that some peoples' 'Peppermint Twist' show ongoing reversions (stem mutations) back to the parent 'Candy Floss', while other peoples' do not.


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Rouge, that's quite the vigorous swath of phlox you've got there, very nice! My local greenhouse stocks a good selection of phlox and I'll have to go see what's available. Last year, I picked up 'White Eye Flame', it's a great little compact plant with BIG flower heads, the largest here measures over 6 inches across!

'White Eye Flame'

This post was edited by twrosz on Fri, Aug 8, 14 at 11:09


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I do very much like that large flower head...but 6" across?! You westerners have some tall stories ;).


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For those of you that have the space it would be so easy to make a stunning bed consisting only of Phlox (Paniculata).


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Rouge don't tempt me :) It wouldn't take much LOL. I did this a few years back with Michaelmas Daisies, still one of my favorite flowers. I ordered some root cuttings from Paul Picton in the UK early spring. From tiny root cuttings I had a beautiful Michaelmas Daisy border come september.

Annette


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I have been looking locally but have not been able to pick up any Red Phlox until this year, when I found Red Flame. It is a pretty bright red but right now is much taller than the 15 to 18 inches indicated on the tag.

Linda


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Anyone have experience with "Peacock Cherry Red?"

I was at a nursery today and it appeared to be more red than "Red Flame".


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I love phlox, and it's a native plant, too.


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Think three of the showiest summer perennial blooms here are garden phlox, daylilies and helenium.

The daylilies are almost over and most of the heleniums are just beginning, but the garden phlox are still going strong.


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That picture is a keeper SB. The variety of colors is very impressive.

(When you have a moment take an on-line look at PEACOCK "Cherry Red" Phlox....in person it looked more red than any other phlox I have seen.)


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Thanks Rouge.

Did.
There's a Peacock series of garden phlox.
What nursery?


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SB, do you know of the "PEACOCK" series of phlox?

(I did purchase "Cherry Red" and will plant it sometime in September or October when I plan to do some rearranging of existing perennials).


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No Rouge.
Followed up your entry.

But too many garden phlox series?
Once upon a time, there were 800 named garden phlox varieties; mostly now lost.

Still I'd rather not think of garden phlox as "collectables" (?), but rather as key contributors to the overall beauty of whole sunny perennial gardens in summer.


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Lovely displays on this thread.

Kato, please tell me what the large leaved plant is next to your Nora
Leigh.

Went looking for Shockwave today as had a birthday gift certificate at local nursery. Sadly not there. Saw a couple of mammoth mums though didn't buy the Yellow Quill which I really like but never survives the winter for me. Maybe I will go back for it another day.

My phlox are all blooming, David, Starfire, Laura, a pale pink, a medium pink and a very dark pink.and a dark pinkish purple. Wonderful fragrance.


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Wow Sunny, that last picture is exceptional! Thanks for sharing and also thanks for the starfire comparison, sorry I didn't thank you sooner! I think I'll just call my phlox "not starfire" to keep it simple.... but I did almost buy 'Lord Clayton' last week just to compare (and because it looked tempting... except for the mildew)

Rouge- I was looking at a bed full of sunflowers and dahlias and thought to myself how nice it might look filled with phlox! Bad thoughts**

mnwsgal- the foliage plant next to Nora leigh is a hardy fig struggling to recover from last winter. I never give it the care it needs to get figs, but I love the leaves. My early phlox are over here, I forget there are other zones.... glad to hear yours are coming on nice now! fyi- out of the mammoth mums I planted, yellowquill seems less vigorous, so I don't think it has anything to do with you.


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Thanks, Kato.

One more.
Today:


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just beautiful!


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Oh my, what eye candy. A truly magnificent border.

Annette


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I can almost smell them!


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SunnyBorders ... that is one amazing photo :)

Please tell me the name of the tall light blue phlox at the very top of the photo, it's gorgeous!


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SB, that photo might be the most impressive picture posted in 2014 in this forum...outstanding.

You clearly are a Phlox paniculata aficionado.

Maybe when you have time (or maybe it would be better as a dedicated thread) you could give us your top 5 Phlox P.

This post was edited by rouge21 on Fri, Aug 15, 14 at 14:16


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I don't know when I have enjoyed a thread more, thanks guys :).
I'm redoing a couple of my flower beds, hope to have them ready for planting next spring, in the meantime my pot ghetto is growing LOL.
I definitely want to add more Phlox so I'll be on the hunt for some of the ones I've seen in this thread.
Not to many mail order sources in Canada that I know of that carry a lot of the different varieties, it's a pick one up here, another one there.
In the spring the garden centers do carry some of them on the racks but I prefer to buy them in gallon pots if possible, actually see what I'm getting.

Charlie would you mind listing the variety names you have in your border?

Annette


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I keep coming to this thread and just am amazed at the beauty of these pictures. I have had nothing but problems with my phlox and have now removed all. I would like to begin again next spring with new varieties that might be better suited for backyard gardens. It looks like the phlox is closely planted and I love the look. Yet, no disease issues. That is encouraging. Just love these pictures. Thanks to all. Lesley


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Thanks.

I will Rouge, Annette.
Have taken stock of the garden phlox as they came into bloom this year, but need to check a bit more.

Twrosz, I took the picture late in the day, trying to accommodate other colours on my camera. That tall phlox (much of it over 4 foot tall) is a bluish pink, I'd say it's a very pretty mauve. For colour comparison, that purple phlox is 'Purple Flame'.

That mauve one is one of a few tall old No Name garden phlox, purchased over ten years ago, at the local horticultural society plant sale. As all likely know, the more recent phlox are typically shorter and also patented; latter presumably eliminates a horticultural society sale source for those phlox.

As others have noted, having some tall garden phlox adds a lot to a summer border.

Further to Lesley's post, things don't always go as intended. We don't normally have much of a powdery mildew problem with our garden phlox. I'm pretty hands-on in thinning things out and especially in promptly getting plants cut back (after flowering) and eliminating plant debris from the flower beds. This, however, has been an odd year here weatherwise (late cold spring, then needing to water, then too much rain; currently is unseasonably cold). Consequently I'm finding a fair bit of powdery mildew on phlox cultivars (in some locations), even though those cultivars are generally mildew resistant.

I'm now being forced to cut back some stems of phlox which still have good flower displays and have just started stripping off leaves from some stems in order to allow the blooming to keep on going. Don't want to leave leaves infested with the mildew lying on the soil surface.

Charlie


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Here is Norah Leigh. Best variegated phlox without any mildew.


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That is wonderful specimen 'bluerose'.

I find Shockwave to be more vigorous than NL and still also has very little mildew (picture shown earlier in this thread).

And of course personally speaking I think the flower colour for Shockwave blends better with the variegated foliage than is the case for NL. (But I am not really sure what colour would be best with such variegation for any perennial!)

I am though surprised how late in the season it is before Shockwave is in bloom. Even now with the plants in full sun it isnt even close to flowering.


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Lovely pictures.

Annette, Rouge, still thinking about it!

Re Kato's, Bluerose's and Rouge's pictures and comments on variegated garden phlox:

I have over 20 years experience with 'Nora Leigh', two with 'Shockwave' and one with 'Harlequin'; so I know much more about 'Nora Leigh'.

I garden for flower colour, but I'm almost thinking of saying that 'Nora Leigh' is the single best garden phlox of all. Last year, its foliage made it one of the last perennials still looking very attractive in our garden in mid-October. All other garden phlox had been cut back long before.

I personally (as Rouge appropriately notes) prefer the foliage of 'Nora Leigh' to that of 'Shockwave'; namely, there's a real contrast between the green and clear white (not somewhat yellowish or yellowish green).

This year has been a terrible year for garden phlox here (with alternating periods of dry and wet, hot and cold and sunny and overcast). I'm currently dealing (manually) with more powdery mildew on the phlox than I've ever seen.

I'm seeing very little or no evidence of powdery mildew on the five 'Nora Leigh' we have, while I'm fighting powdery mildew on numbers of supposed powdery-mildew-resistant recent phlox cultivars. It's quite definite that the presence of the mildew is associated with the particular location of individual plants in our garden. One 'Shockwave' has some mildew (was hard to see at first) and three have very little or none.

I like the fact that 'Nora Leigh' is a larger and more gracefully shaped (?) plant than 'Shockwave', though of course, the availability of space may be issue. Presumably this comes back to recent/current selection for smaller, more compact cultivars that don't need staking.

Re 'Nora Leigh', I don't think I've ever once had to stake it.

Picture (August 28, 2011) from a perennial garden I planted and maintained.

This post was edited by SunnyBorders on Mon, Aug 18, 14 at 12:07


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Annette, Rouge, still thinking about it!

Maybe you (and others of course) can include as a worthwhile statistic the start of flowering.

For example "Shockwave" is very late in showing flowers (for sure compensated by its wonderful standalone foliage). In my zone it will start blooming in late August.

What are some earlier flowering phlox?


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Can't be much help on this as I really haven't kept track. 'Blue Paradise' and 'Mt. Fugi' are still going strong, 'Purple Kiss' is finished, these are the only ones I still had until lately, the rest are still in pots waiting to be planted this fall when I redo a couple of beds. I just picked up a nice little 4" pot of 'Swizzle' for .49 off a clearing out table. The others still in pots are 'Nicky', 'Peppermint Twist', 'Red Caraibbean', 'David' and 'Tequilla Sunrise' all bought for 40% off with the exception of R. P. paid 9.99 for it.

Annette


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Don't generally think "worthwhile" is possible, Rouge.

And that is for two reasons; (1) we only have one or two of many of the cultivars and (2) I notice a fair bit of variability when we have more of a particular cultivar.

To the latter point, we have 8 'Peppermint Twist'. The one in the most shaded location started blooming at least two weeks after others did.

More incongruous to me: we have one 'Robert Poore', which has finished blooming. Two years ago I noticed a seedling in front of it which I left. Now I'm sure that it is also 'Robert Poore'. Currently it's in full flower. I'm sure it's in a sunnier location than the parent plant, so perhaps the reason for its later blooming is that it's a younger plant.

I would go as far as saying 'Nora Leigh' (have 6) is a later bloomer here, though we grow it for the long-lived mildew resistant foliage. Have 5 'Shockwave' (most obtained more recently). With 'Shockwave' our experience is the same as Rouge's; it's also a later bloomer.

Our one 'Harlequin' (got it last year) hasn't done much this year, but it would be interesting to know if variegated phlox generally are later bloomers the non-variegated forms.

Variegated perennials are understandably, in general, better behaved/tamer/less vigorous than non-variegated forms. Perhaps they're also slower to start blooming.

The one other cultivar I'd be confident to say is later blooming and it's planted in various locations in our garden is 'Starfire' (have 6). We currently have phlox-red dotted over our garden, which was certainly not the case in July or early August.

An added point is that phlox purchased here in pots, this year, flower earlier than those already in the ground from previous years. The reason is likely that they were grown south of here (maybe in the Carolinas) and then brought north for sale as larger plants.


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'Harlequin' is a beauty for both foliage and flower color, though it takes time for the plant to bulk up and variegation is slow to develop in the spring, though it all comes together very nicely later in the season. This phlox isn't so easy to come by in Canada, I've been searching for a replacement since I had lost mine after moving :(


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Lovely Twrosz.

Didn't realize mine could look like that.

I can thank Rouge for putting me in touch with 'Harlequin'.

Hope you get another soon.


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SunnyBorders, I'll have to give 'Nora Leigh' another try after seeing your amazing photos!

When it comes to variegation and bloom color, I love 'Becky Towe'. I guess we all like different things, as I recall reading on this forum that some had considered the color to be garish shade of pink, it's difficult to capture with my camera, though to my eye it's a gorgeous smooth shade of pink / salmon / coral with a bright pink eye.

'Becky Towe'


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Twrosz, lovely picture.

I've had several 'Becky Towe' in the past. For me, its flower colour is much prettier than that of 'Nora Leigh', but the plants died away.

I'm also enthusiastic about the pink-salmon-coral that's around with a number of the newer phlox cultivars.

What I'd say for 'Nora Leigh' is that it has so much going for it (at least in my experience): it's hardy: long-lived: the plant has a nice overall shape (relatively tall, but still compact - has graceful proportions): retains its shape and leaf colour-contrast well into October and is as mildew resistant as garden phlox come.

I definitely garden for flower colour, but 'Nora Leigh' is just too good for any such bias!


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I need to go out and give Becky a pep talk, she's barely hanging on and not even close to putting on as nice a show as that!
Also Harlequin is looking great, I would love that bloom even on a green leafed plant, though the combo sure is bold.
Rouge my earliest phlox are "Nicky" and "Bright Eyes" followed by "Laura".


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SunnyBorders, my nearby greenhouse had 'Nora Leigh' available earlier in the season, so I'll soon go check the place out again.

kato_b ... yes, 'Nicky', 'Bright Eyes' and 'Laura' are all very good plants!

'Becky Towe' has always thrived from me, maybe it just prefers somewhat cooler summer conditions? I do divide it every three years or strike cuttings directly into the ground. This photos shows just how beautiful the plant can be and the blooms keep coming over a long period of time.


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I need a bigger garden:). Thanks all for showing your beautiful phlox, I've been adding to my...must look for list.

We went down island to my favorite nursery on friday. They have a huge perennial section and this time of year it's a riot of color. Needless to say I didn't come empty handed, no phlox tho, I had all the ones they had left.

Twrosz, 'Becky Towe' is gorgeous I've never seen it for sale around here. Do you know of a good mail order source for it and others here in Canada?

I'm bookmarking this thread, it's going to make a great reference so if anyone has pictures of phlox not already shown please add them now or later, thanks.

Annette


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RE: Phlox paniculata

I would also like to thank twrosz for all the pictures. I hope to try more varieties in my garden as a result. I may find something hardy enough for me.


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RE: Phlox paniculata

I would post my pics but after SB steals the show with all her LOVELY phlox...mine are not worth showing lol.

SB...you get 1st place award...HANDS DOWN!!!

Always love seeing your pics, thanks!


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RE: Phlox paniculata

Thanks, Lilsprout.

I'd say there's a lot of great pictures above, from numbers of folk and please post more, whether individual plants (always interesting) or plants massed.

I think garden phlox, where we live, can make anyones gardening look good. I'm also fortunate to have few obligations to take me away from the garden.


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RE: Phlox paniculata

Have now identified all the garden phlox in the garden this summer; namely 35 different cultivars and 10 older No Names.

Although I can locate all garden phlox by bed in our small garden, it's probably more helpful to mention those cultivars (we've had for more than two years) which I feel have done particularly well for our garden or, in a few cases, I suspect are going to do the same in the future.

White: 'Pina Colada' and taller 'David'.

Purple: Düsterlohe (Nicky), 'Purple Flame' and 'Wendy House' and with more white in the flower 'Purple Kiss', 'Laura' and 'Little Laura'.

Pink: 'Cosmopolitan' (strong pink), 'Bright Eyes' (light with dark centre) and 'Shortwood' (for height).

Pink-salmon-coral: 'Watermelon Punch', 'Tequila Sunrise', 'Glamour Girl' and 'Coral Flame'.

Red and orange: 'Starfire', 'Orange Perfection' and 'Candy Floss'. 'Candy Floss' also appears as reversions with individual stems of 'Peppermint Twist'.

Violet-lavender: 'David's Lavender'.

Pinwheel: 'Peppermint Twist' and 'Twister'.

Our phlox display would not be so nice if not for the inclusion of old No Names purchased over ten years ago at the local horticultural society plant sales.

If I had to pick the three most useful, it would be the tall mauve, the tall purplish pink and the one I call My Pink, in the picture below. My Pink is very vigorous, quite mildew resistant and gives lovely blocks of colour which last a long time.

Forgot to include variegated 'Nora Leigh' for it's very attractive long-lasting shape and foliage.

Picture below: today.

This post was edited by SunnyBorders on Thu, Aug 28, 14 at 20:41


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'My Pink" looks awesome! I like the white star in the center. Was this one of the garden club plants or a seedling that appeared?
I have a few putting on a second show, but mildew has definitely taken hold this year like never before.... I'm not going to bother trying to control it though. I'm interested to see if it will repeat next year since this is the first time I've had a mildew problem.
Wish me luck :)

I picked this handful earlier in the week. They're all late blooming, unnamed seedlings which I found coming up here and there and left for one reason or another. I like them.


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RE: Phlox paniculata

SB, thanks for taking the time to list your Phlox, an impressive list. If I can manage to find even a few of them I'll be a happy camper :).

Right now I'm really enjoying the temperature sensitive 'Blue Paradise' especially early morning when it's a little cooler. It's a little late this year but next year I'll have to fire up my cloning machine and take some cuttings. I've used this for fuchsias and michaelmas daisies with great results, should be great for phlox too.

Annette


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RE: Phlox paniculata

Very pretty handful, Kato.
For me, pink is the single most useful garden phlox colour.

My Pink was purchased at the local horticultural sale.

I don't keep any phlox seedlings (big on deadheading) of plants that seed. I have read that phlox seedlings tend to revert back to the " wishy-washy pink" of the species in the wild. Observed that myself with 'White Admiral'.

Re "luck", I do Kato.
However, I'm beginning to think powdery mildew on garden phlox perhaps runs in cycles. The Chicago Botanic Garden study found that 2004 was by far the worst year for the mildew (the study ran from 2001 to 2009).

This is the worst year I can remember for our garden and you indicate the same for your phlox.

My ultimate personal reaction to mildew is to not let it overwinter in plant debris in the garden.

Would like to think it's useful, Annette, but we naturally tend to "push" the perennials we know, albeit those that have done well for us.

I'm going to try 'Blue Paradise' again. Thought it was very attractive. It's interesting how some garden phlox just take off in ones garden (e.g. for us 'Peppermint Twist' and My Pink, while others have nowhere near as strong growth (e.g. for us 'Blue Boy' and 'Red Riding Hood'). Likely the precise locations in which they were planted has been a contributing factor.


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Rouge, Sunnyborders, your borders look so full and lush, when initially planting what spacing do you use? Do you plant fairly close together and then remove some of the plants as they fill in or do you space them out. Rule of thumb, how much space do you leave between individual plants? I've done it both ways, just curious to which way you think best.

Annette


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  • Posted by dbarron Z6/7 (Oklahoma) (My Page) on
    Fri, Aug 29, 14 at 12:37

twrosz, your combo with the salmon phlox and the rudbeckias is stunning.

I normally feel variegated plants look diseased...but I didn't even notice it in your shot at first! That's a compliment.


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RE: Phlox paniculata

Besides spring, Annette, I plant for summer and fall herbaceous perennials and usually avoid woody ones (e.g. shrubs).

Some of what I plant doesn't like being disturbed, e.g. balloon flowers and peonies. Most of it, however, does much better if it's periodically reduced (and moved) and replanted with new organic soil.

Consequently I feel free to plant closely. You could plant a perennial bed with the plants three foot away from each other and it would look great in three years time. Personally, I want the effect quickly, as most people do.

With my close planting, it's necessary to avoid seeders and especially runners, which usually means avoiding the species (and paying more for well behaved cultivars).

I reduce and move around plants probably a lot, as required with close spacing. With some perennials (e.g garden phlox), it doesn't seem to matter when they are divided as long as watering is covered. For instance, this year my one phlox 'Twister' seemed to be not getting enough sun by the time it started to flower, so I moved it to a better location (watched watering) and it's fine.

Needless-to-say, (1) this works well for our growing conditions and (2) I'm basically retired and have a lot to time available for gardening.

Re variegated perennials: I never liked variegated perennials either, but I'm now a convert. Many perennials only bloom for two or three weeks and so variegated ones really add some variation to a mixed perennial bed. The other thing that really appeals to me is the fact that variegated perennials may be less vigourous (= tamer) than the non-variegated forms ( e.g. with yellow loosestrife or obedient plant cultivars).


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SB, thanks for sharing your method of planting, I pretty much plant the same way you do, to get that full look I usually plant pretty close together and move some when they get crowded or...sometimes it's like musical chairs until I get it right LOL..

Annette


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Such valuable information SB. Thank you so much for organizing it all.

That is a gorgeous picture 'kato'...crystal clear and so many shades of pink..incredible.

"Becky Towe's" flower color stands out in striking contrast to the variegated foliage. Thanks for this picture ' twrosz'.

Slowly my stand of "Shockwave" is coming into bloom with the flowers a light mauve. But it won't be for a couple of weeks before it is in full bloom...very late I am thinking.


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aftermidnight, I've come across 'Becky Towe' being rather widely available in several greenhouses in Alberta, though had received mine years ago from Dominion. I hope you can soon come across it :)

north53, thanks for the complement, here's to hoping you'll be able to winter some very nice phlox varieties for yourself. I've been very impressed with photos of your very lush and vigorous plantings!

dbarron, yes, the photo with the rudbeckias did turn out rather nice! I've always loved variegated plants, well it rather does depend on the type, as some can indeed look rather sickly.

kato_b, those are all beautiful seedlings !!

rouge, 'BT' is one of my all time favorite perennials!

SunnyBorders, your photos are exceptional and plants so lovely, I'm a bit jealous!



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I picked up a Becky Towe on sale yesterday. Only got one as the other plant left had part that reverted back to all green. Now to chose a place to plant it in my garden. Bloom is lighter and more coral than I was expecting.

This post was edited by mnwsgal on Sun, Aug 31, 14 at 15:08


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Compare previously posted "Becky Towes" and "Harlequin" with "Shockwave" which is finally coming into bloom. (Love seeing the differences in bloom color among the 3).

 photo P1030231_1_zps5b4a544d.jpg

This post was edited by rouge21 on Mon, Sep 8, 14 at 19:27


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Nice picture, Rouge.

Interesting comparison.


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  • Posted by catkin UDSA Zone 8 (My Page) on
    Thu, Sep 4, 14 at 22:25

That's a beauty, rouge! My Nora reverted years ago but I still like her bloom! I've never seen the other variegated forms!


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