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Pros/Cons of These Red Roses

Posted by alameda 8 - East Texas (My Page) on
Sun, Mar 30, 14 at 0:10

I have Chrysler Imperial, Oklahoma, Crimson Glory, Mr. Lincoln and just bought a Mirandy today. All but Crimson Glory are new this year. I normally prefer the softer colors, but have become interested in fragrant reds this year.

Would like to know the pros and cons of these 5 - and any little quirks they might have [i.e. shade in afternoon, etc.] Would enjoy knowing which are favorites and why - any information would be interesting! I live in east Texas - it gets quite hot in summer so would like to know if I should give any of them afternoon shade. For whatever reason, I have not grown many red roses, but this year, I am really attracted to them......hate the name but really like the newer rose Ketchup and Mustard and it just arrived.

I know Mr. Lincoln likes to grow tall. My Crimson Glory is own root, is currently in a large pot and growing well. I plan to plant all these in a bed soon. Thanks for any opinions!

Judith


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Pros/Cons of These Red Roses

Hi Judith, give them all afternoon shade. Very fragrant petals tend to be softer, more easily damaged than unscented petals because they usually lack the "waxy substance" of the unscented petals. These also tend to be darker colored, which absorbs more sun/heat than lighter colors so they tend to burn, crisp, faster.

My Lincoln was an Armstrong Roseling, the tissue cultured, supposedly free from RMV, plant. It stayed about five feet tall. Oklahoma, Mirandy and Chrysler Imperial were infected Dr. Huey plants which remained around four feet. Crimson Glory was own root and remained about three feet.

Crimson Glory was the worst mildewer. Mirandy was the worst for rust. The others occasionally contracted either mildew, rust or slight black spot, but nothing horrible. Of course, the disease pressure where you are is much worse for black spot and you likely have different strains of it than I do. And, rust is likely not the issue for you it is here. I think you'll enjoy them. Oklahoma and Crimson Glory are the darkest; Lincoln and Imperial are next then Mirandy. They all smell pretty good! Kim


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RE: Pros/Cons of These Red Roses

  • Posted by seil z6b MI (My Page) on
    Sun, Mar 30, 14 at 11:33

I think it's pretty safe to say that your list of old HTs are pretty good. They've been around and are still being produce for good reason. They're good roses.

Oklahoma has beautiful large blooms but like most HTs takes quite a while to recycle between blooms and is prone to black spot. They also don't hold for a very long time and are not the longest lasting cut flowers either. But the color is a rich deep dark red and it is fragrant.

Mr. Lincoln wasn't very good for me. It was very spotty and didn't winter one year which was surprising. Other people grow it here with no problems. It might have just not liked it's spot. The blooms were not quite as dark as OK and a little smaller in size but they did last longer. And of course, it was fragrant.


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RE: Pros/Cons of These Red Roses

Mister Lincoln, I miss him, he got way to tall for me and of course, all the flowers were on top.
Chrysler Imperial, I cannot be without this rose. Very fragrant and stays about 4 ft tall. Flowers everywhere! I like the bush shape too, full and not an eye sore. I often take cuttings to work.
Veterans Honor and Fire fighter cannot hold a candle to CI.


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RE: Pros/Cons of These Red Roses

Double post.

This post was edited by msjam2 on Sun, Mar 30, 14 at 11:54


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RE: Pros/Cons of These Red Roses

  • Posted by seil z6b MI (My Page) on
    Sun, Mar 30, 14 at 12:39

I don't know about Firefighter but I can tell you Veterans' Honor is lovely and lasts for ages on and off the bush but has NO fragrance at all.


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RE: Pros/Cons of These Red Roses

I love Chrysler Imperial, it's a good rose. Mine's been a little slow to get going though..


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RE: Pros/Cons of These Red Roses

When I started planting hybrid teas again, my red was Olympiad because of it's good repeat. I had a Mr. LIncoln but I didn't like the bluing.

This year I planted Firefighter and Chrysler Imperial for fragrance. Firefighter seems to be a slower starter and CI is the only HT I have with mildew issues. I am hoping that one the rains stop it will be under control.


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RE: Pros/Cons of These Red Roses

  • Posted by maryl Z7 Okla. (My Page) on
    Sun, Mar 30, 14 at 19:46

Of the reds you have listed my number one favorite for my area is Chrysler Imperial. Number two would be Crimson Glory. ........... Mr. Lincoln is liked by many but I found it way too tall (8 foot and taller). Chrysler Imperial by contrast is around 5 feet tall which makes it just right for a sniff-a-thon when in bloom.......... Oklahoma is lacking in vigor and disease resistance. Great Fragrance...... Mirandy was almost always one of the first to bloom, but after the spring flush it usually just sat there....Enjoy.....Maryl


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RE: Pros/Cons of These Red Roses

Mister Lincoln: I talk about getting rid of him every year. It is way too tall and the flowers are not plentiful. The scent, however, is intoxicating.


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RE: Pros/Cons of These Red Roses

I read the various descriptions of the virtues of Chrysler Imperial and wonder how I managed to get the runt of the litter. While my Chrysler Imperial has a lovely bloom and smells good, it is always an undergrown plant--never more than a couple feet tall and not at all vigorous--always looks a bit weakly. And I have to wait too long for it to re-bloom.

I won't get rid of it -- unless a wonderful disease-resistant red that smells really good comes along--but I do hope Chrysler decides to shape up this year.

Kind of a tough call after the bruising winter cold it just went through. Had to prune it down nearly to the soil line--but there are a lot of red stems and leaves down there.

Everyone help out now--think positive thoughts about my Chrysler Imperial to encourage it to finally flourish--please!

Kate


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RE: Pros/Cons of These Red Roses

Kate,

Mine is in full sun, she loves plenty of water.


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RE: Pros/Cons of These Red Roses

Thanks, msjam. Mine is in full sun too. I'll have to keep an eye out and see if she is getting enough water.

Kate


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RE: Pros/Cons of These Red Roses

Mr. Lincoln was one my first roses I planted here over 25 years ago and is still going strong. Mine doesn't grow that tall and has stayed a small bush. I have pruned it heavily in the past to keep it that way. I loved Chrysler Imperial but it died within 2 years. I don't know what killed it. I should get another one.


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RE: Pros/Cons of These Red Roses

Much of what I could say about the subject red roses has already been said. However I would add this about Crimson Glory. I used to have this rose many years ago, but haven't had it for a while. Its growth habit is relatively short and sprawls. It also usually has weak neck and needs to be grown disbudded if you want one flower per stem. It clusters much of the time. A fertilizer higher in phosphorus and potassium will help alleviate the weak necks. Another fertilizer issue is Crimson Glory's sensitivity to high nitrogen fertilizers. It will suffer foliage burn if you dump too much nitrogen on it more than most other varieties. If you don't use it already, I would suggest using a little blood meal added to a low nitrogen fertilizer for this rose. Blood meal is higher in nitrogen, but it is organic and breaks down slowly. It also has iron which is great for color development especially for anything based on red. Put that on all of the roses and watch the colors light up. You don't need much, maybe a half teaspoon per plant. Good luck.


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RE: Pros/Cons of These Red Roses

Thanks Bustopher for the fertilizing info on Crimson Glory - just the sort of advice I need. I don't mind Mr. Lincoln getting big, I knew he likes to grow that way - saw one my friend has yesterday - he prunes, but lets it get big and it is a good bloomer for him. I just bought the Mirandy from Lowes in a big pot last weekend......haven't planted it yet, but it looks like it will really be a healthy bush. From what has been said, I think I will plant all these in an area that gets sun all day until about 2 or 3pm, then my horse barn will shade them. I am interested in growing all these and comparing them - plan to put them in the same area and intersperse with white euphorbia, white marigolds with some blue salvia [my son is in the Navy, and have a stone with the Navy insignia on it I will put in the middle of the semi-circle of these roses for a patriotic theme].
Judith


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