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photo of my own roots rose

Posted by tropical_thought San Francisco (My Page) on
Thu, Mar 29, 12 at 14:01

It is not easy to get an own roots rose. But, I was lucky to have this one just sprout spontaneously. I don't know if it from a "seed" or from a piece of root of another rose that was here before but removed. I don't know if it will bloom. If it blooms, that should help be figure out what kind of rose it is. It looks really healthy and does not have any fungal problems.

Here is a link that might be useful: Own Roots Rose Photo


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: photo of my own roots rose

Take a close look at the photo of foliage here:
http://www.helpmefind.com/rose/l.php?l=21.62042
on HelpMeFind Roses. This is photo of 'Dr. Huey,' at about the same stage.

The one photographed was coming up from the roots of a budded 'Fourth Of July.' But Huey can easily re-grow from a bit of root left behind.

Jeri

Here is a link that might be useful: 'Dr. Huey' foliage, at HelpMeFind


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RE: photo of my own roots rose

Jeri, that's what I thought too - I just noticed two more of these little devils coming up my rose bed today!

Tropical Thought - if it has semi-double red roses, and gets a lot of mildew, it is probably Dr. Huey, a once blooming rose that is used as rootstock.

If it blooms and it is NOT red, post a picture, and someone may be able to identify it.

Just so you know, it is easy to get "own root" roses - you just need to order them from a nursery like Vintage Gardens (Sebastopol), or many others - I am sure if you google "own root roses" and put "nursery" on another line, many will pop up. I have over 100 roses in my garden, and they are all own root.

Jackie


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RE: photo of my own roots rose

Ah yes, in theory, but you can't get any from Vintage Garden's they are out of business. I was going to get one from them, but they don't even answer my email.

Yes, I think it must be Huey. I would like a red rose, I don't have one, I wonder how the flower will look? All red roses get a lot of mildew, so I hear. It is not in an ideal location, normally I would have pulled it out, but this time I left it in. It may have grown back before, but I would pull it out each time. I never do get the root out.


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RE: photo of my own roots rose

You can see more photos of Dr. Huey in the link below. I don't know your area, but I'm sure you can find healthy red roses for any climate, and I'm sure almost anything would be more attractive than Dr. Huey.

Why is it important for you to have an own-root rose? If you're worried about something like RMV then Dr. Huey is probably the last rose you'd want to consider.

Here is a link that might be useful: More Dr. Huey photos


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RE: photo of my own roots rose

I just want to try one out. I can't get one easily as I mentioned. It may blend with the red and purple fuchsia I have growing near by. It might work, if it won't get too big.
I picked out a red rose that was supposed to be disease free, but the petal count was too high and it would not open in San Francisco weather. What a pain! I gave it away on craigslist. I am not eager to waste more money on new roses.


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RE: photo of my own roots rose

I can't say much about the rose, but how cool is it to have 4 leaf clovers in your garden?!


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RE: photo of my own roots rose

The clover is Trifolium repens salsa dancer . If you are near me I can give you some. I planted one plant years ago, divided it, and now it works as a ground cover any place I want one. It takes sun and shade and has white flowers. Also those are lawn daises that I dug up from a park that they were about to tear down, saving them. They are also a good ground cover.

Here is a link that might be useful: Photo of Trifolium repens salsa dancer


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RE: photo of my own roots rose

  • Posted by TNY78 7a-East TN (My Page) on
    Thu, Mar 29, 12 at 20:33

Trust me, Vintage Gardens in still very much in business; I just received an email from them earlier today. They are talking about closing next year, but hopefully that won't happen. There's quite a few ownroot vendors on the west coast: Rogue Valley, Heirloom, Burlington, Northland, High Country...etc. Try Googling some of these nurseries, and the varieties available will amaze you :) Plus, they are also very helpful in making reccomendations based on your location.
Tammy


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RE: photo of my own roots rose

Even if I could get one without bother, I would have to drive up and get buy it, soil can't be shipped in CA, I would like to see more photos of people with successful own roots roses.
I wish people would post them and tag them so I can find them, if the site allows tagging.


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RE: photo of my own roots rose

If you can have UPS delivery, you can receive roses from the nurseries listed above and many more nurseries without having to go out and get them.

I am guessing you are an experienced gardener and not as passionate about roses as many of the people who use this site.

All of the nurseries listed above can have the plants delivered to you. Some nurseries which ship own root roses are better than others, so getting input from people on this forum about their experiences with a given nursery is a good place to start.

More than 90 % of my roses are own root roses. Some of them fit my new climate quite well and others are struggling. It's the same with the few budded roses I have. As usual, it depends on the rose.

Smiles,
Lyn


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RE: photo of my own roots rose

I did searches on Google image search, and I finally found just one at last. The blog said the rose was floppy, but it looked nice. It was a bit short I think, more like the shape of a low growing shrub rose. And I don't have a lot of space, so that is another factor. There is a huge woody fuchsia growing right nearby, you can't see in the photo, but I don't have to move the fuchsia. If the rose gets big for the space I will have remove it. On Flickr there was only one photo tagged own roots and it was just a shot of the flower, so I could not see how the plant looked. I do have a sort of white "shrub rose" someone gave me, so that counts as an own roots but that hasn't bloomed yet either. I like to wait for something to die or otherwise leave to make space. I just found this link. I did have a Livin Easy Rose. I was thinking about a hybrid tea that normally does not get put on its own roots. I never considered that other non hybrid teas are also own roots. I am glad I got that cleared up then. I always assumed Livin Easy was grafted. It was so vigorous and huge, I did not have space for it.

Here is a link that might be useful: Livin Easy own roots


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RE: photo of my own roots rose

Tropical -- 'Dr. Huey' is a VERY vigorous once-blooming (non-remontant) Climbing rose, of quite generous proportions. It was an important rose in its day, but isn't ideal for California gardens.

Many excellent roses, however, are available on their own roots.

Dr. Huey is on his own roots BECAUSE he is rootstock. FWIW.

Jeri


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RE: photo of my own roots rose

Tropical.........

Jeri is very right about Dr. H being very, very vigorous. It's also very difficult to remove once it gets established.

You probably saw this photo on the link provided above, but you can really see that Dr. Huey can take up all of the space you have available and still wants more.

Right now, I have a Dr. H. I have been trying to kill for two years taking apart the block planters out in front of my house. I have high hopes that I have weakened the plant sufficiently that I'll get it dead this year and can repair the planters.

I may like the rose, but it's the wrong rose for this garden.

Smiles,
Lyn

Here is a link that might be useful: Dr. Huey Photo


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RE: photo of my own roots rose

That is so sad, I guess I better dig it out then.


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RE: photo of my own roots rose

Pretty spectacular tho, isn't it? When it's in bloom, it's magnificent.

There's a large, deserted homesite up the hill from us. The house burned to the ground some years ago, in a spectacular conflagration, and it's since been bare. I noticed yesterday, after our recent rainstorms, a dark red bloom down there, which I suspect is Dr. Huey. I'll be interested to watch it develop.

Jeri


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RE: photo of my own roots rose

Dr. Huey would look good only if I had like a few acres of wild land somewhere to put it on. It won't work at all for my tiny garden.


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Nicer photo

Look how good Huey looks on Help Me Find.

Here is a link that might be useful: Huey on Help Me Find


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RE: photo of my own roots rose

In my experience, in my own California garden, own-root roses take much longer to "catch on" and bloom well. I am not discouraging you, just saying. Once they establish, they do well. But--it does take patience.
I was able to get own root roses from a seller who went out of business and from friends who rooted roses for me.
My neighbor, a few years ago, had a gigantic dark red spring blooming rose on the side of his house that he did not plant! I see it is no longer there.


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RE: photo of my own roots rose

I may get tropical sunset. I know it will take three years to get it established, but I would still like to try one out just to see. The problem is finding a space. I have to wait for something to die first.

Here is a link that might be useful: tropical sunset


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RE: photo of my own roots rose

  • Posted by seil z6b MI (My Page) on
    Sat, Mar 31, 12 at 16:40

Ooo, that's pretty!


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RE: photo of my own roots rose

Maybe I missed it-if it hasn't bloomed yet, why not wait and see? I had one in my garden next to a grafted rose, and it is NOT Dr. Huey. The blooms look like Ballerina, but they are more red. Prolific bloomer, almost looks like it may be a rambler, long, pliable canes. I like it a lot. If I saw it for sale I'd get it.


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Now its wait and see time

I did not pull it out yet. If it decides to bloom before becoming too big for the space.... I don't think I can dig it out and move it. I was not able to find the root that it comes from the past. I sometimes see things that look like rose seedlings coming up, but they turn into weed instead. This one started to look more like a rose over time. But, it decides to become enormous before blooming I have to get rid of it.


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