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How to treat roses to prevent cane borers?

Posted by cjrosaphile z8 Pacific NW (My Page) on
Fri, Apr 22, 11 at 20:33

I've searched the web and have found a mix of opinion. Some say use paint, wax, colored glue on the ends of freshly cut canes. Others say that nothing works. I did just lose a Double Delight to cane borers. What are your opinions out there. Thx, cj


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: How to treat roses to prevent cane borers?

I use molding and trim wood glue--it doesn't drip.


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RE: How to treat roses to prevent cane borers?

  • Posted by jim1961 5/6 Central Pa (My Page) on
    Fri, Apr 22, 11 at 23:11

Elmers carpenters wood glue


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RE: How to treat roses to prevent cane borers?

ditto on elmers


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RE: How to treat roses to prevent cane borers?

Ditto on Elmers as well.


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RE: How to treat roses to prevent cane borers?

Elmer's glue either wood or regular white work well yup.


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RE: How to treat roses to prevent cane borers?

Here in the PNW we have two types of cane borers--rose cane borers and raspberry cane borers. Rose cane borers are mostly annoying. They kill the top inch or two of the rose cane but new growth will emerge further down the cane and the rose will be fine. Some people will seal the cane but those of us who have lots of roses don't bother--it takes too much time!

Raspberry cane borers are a differant matter. They will burrrow all the way down the cane and even into the crown of the plant and maybe kill the rose. Since you say your rose was killed I'm guessing that this is what you have. The good news is that roses are not the prefered food of raspberry cane borers--they prefer raspberries and if they can't get them they go for blackberries. If you have them on your roses it is usually a sign that somewhere in your neighborhood someone has taken out their raspberries or taken out blackberries and the hungry critters ate your roses. After a few years the cane borers will either die out or the raspberries or blackberries will come back and they will go eat those.

In the meantime, you can control the borers by keeping an eye on your roses and if you see dieback on the canes below two inches, cut back the cane to below the dieback. You will see a catapillar-ish looking thing at the bottom of the tunnel. Dispose of it. The good news is that since these critters have a one year life cycle, once you have disposed of them, they will not come back for a year. I don't know if a systemic insecticide will work. Systemics cannot be used on edibles and since this is mainly a pest of raspberries, the insecticides will not be labeled for use on raspberry cane borers. But they might work for raspberry cane borers on roses. But it is probably less work to just cut them out when you see them rather than spraying.


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RE: How to treat roses to prevent cane borers?

What everyrose said. Cane borers are not a big problem here and I don't generally recommend sealing pruning ends. Raspberry borers are a rare menace. Sealing pruning ends won't stop them.


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