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rose soil mix..gone wrong help

Posted by Hrose none (My Page) on
Fri, May 4, 12 at 13:10

disaster!... :( follow link for pictures
http://s840.photobucket.com/albums/zz322/amon_03/

miracle grow potting soil,peat moss,perlite,humus,soil,clay soil,compost half the pot i filled with miracle grow and the other half a mix of all the other stuff

the new growth is kinda white almost like fungus but its not fungus i planted the rose into the pot about two weeks ago its not too late to pull it back out but i want to know what i did wrong ???? BOB???...anyone??


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: rose soil mix..gone wrong help

this mix was recommended by bobbyb123 i was told it would pump out tons of beautiful blooms but instead i get white burnt looking leaves i had a feeling this mix was going to be too strong but i went against my better judgement


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RE: rose soil mix..gone wrong help

Are you located in the same place as the person who recommended that soil mix?

I know this will make some people gasp in horror, but I usually just use potting soil in a pot without mixing up a big science project. For me, simpler is better and very successful.

In your photos I don't see any white fungus. Which rose is this? How long has it been outside & what has your weather been like? Any frosts lately? How old is this rose and when did it leaf out?


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RE: rose soil mix..gone wrong help

"a big science" project yeah no kidding

it's a hybird tea forgot the exact name its been outside for about 2 weeks no freezing temps spring like weather i'm not sure how old the rose is i bought it from the store about 3 weeks ago in a 1 gallon pot most the leaves were already on it its the new leaves that looks white and burnt which is a pretty good reason for me to think that the soil mix is no good

i'm sure the soil is too strong a mix i'm going to remove most of the fancy soil which is now a waste of time and money and put some plain regular soil to help balance it out


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RE: rose soil mix..gone wrong help

Regular garden soil is usually too heavy for pot culture. The only thing I see that could cause problems in pot culture would be the clay. If you have too much clay, it can cause the pot to not drain properly. What were the ratios on the additives? Sometimes if peat moss isn't mixed well with other ingredients, it's hard to get it wet.

I'm like Flaura, I usually use a commercial potting MIX, not soil, for my roses in pots.


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RE: rose soil mix..gone wrong help

For pots, use only potting soil. Any "humus", etc., you may mulch with but you don't have the air and water circulation in a pot you will have in the ground and all that "good stuff" can sour instead of 'digesting'. I agree with flaurabuna, simple IS better, particularly in a pot! You're going to want to make sure the drainage for that pot is excellent. I would not put a saucer under it, but probably put it up on stones or pot feet so the water flushes fully from it. The chances of it remaining too wet sitting in a saucer and having some of the 'humus' souring are too great to leave any water sitting in that soil. Hopefully, the rose will hang on until fall/winter when you can safely repot it into just plain, old, regular potting soil. Save the other good stuff for amending the soil in the ground where any too-high levels of anything which may require more oxygen can more easily be accommodated. Potting soils are already formulated to provide appropriate drainage. Adding perlite increases drainage as well as holding more water. Humus slows it down, holding more water than even the perlite will. Clay soil holds water, slowing drainage. Peat moss slows drainage and makes the soil very acidic, which could easily be a big part of your issue. The pH is too acidic for the rose to function properly. Soil is fine in the ground, but usually doesn't drain well enough for pots. Compost can mean virtually anything organic and can stay far too wet for pots. It's what you mix with soil to improve it in the ground, or on top of the soil for mulch. Stick with potting soil in containers. You'll be much happier with the results as long as the stuff you use is a good quality. Kim


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RE: rose soil mix..gone wrong help

Kim--I keep hearing "good quality potting mix" here and in the instructions with my new bands. How does one determine when standing in the potting mix aisle of our local garden centers what is "good quality?" I know there are some that hate the big garden companies, but can you recommend some brands that would be readily available?


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RE: rose soil mix..gone wrong help

good quality potting mix is what i used miracle grow potting soil and it was way too strong don't be fooled these so called good quality soils are packed and loaded with tons of acids and fertilizer that will burn your newly planted rose unless you mix it with just soil but then you cant find just soil to buy anywhere they are all mixed with one thing or another organic this and compost that fertilizer this and enriched that


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RE: rose soil mix..gone wrong help

  • Posted by seil z6b MI (My Page) on
    Fri, May 4, 12 at 15:42

I've been growing potted roses for 7 years now and I've never used any "special" mix. I regularly use the Sta-Green potting mix from Lowes, because it's the least expensive, with very good results. The Miracle Grow potting soil is great but usually costs an arm and a leg, lol. I try to look for ones that don't have a lot of extra stuff like water crystals and fertilizers because those always jack the price up.

You just want to avoid heavy garden soils because they don't drain well enough in pots. Although, the first year I grew potted roses I used the dirt right out of my garden because I didn't know any better and they did great. So well in fact that I soon ended up with over 60 potted roses at one point, lol! My sore back and sanity have prevailed and I'm down to 30 now.


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RE: rose soil mix....gone wrong help

"For pots, use only potting soil. Any "humus", etc., you may mulch with but you don't have the air and water circulation in a pot you will have in the ground and all that "good stuff" can sour instead of 'digesting'. I agree with flaurabuna, simple IS better, particularly in a pot! You're going to want to make sure the drainage for that pot is excellent. I would not put a saucer under it, but probably put it up on stones or pot feet so the water flushes fully from it. The chances of it remaining too wet sitting in a saucer and having some of the 'humus' souring are too great to leave any water sitting in that soil. Hopefully, the rose will hang on until fall/winter when you can safely repot it into just plain, old, regular potting soil. Save the other good stuff for amending the soil in the ground where any too-high levels of anything which may require more oxygen can more easily be accommodated. Potting soils are already formulated to provide appropriate drainage. Adding perlite increases drainage as well as holding more water. Humus slows it down, holding more water than even the perlite will. Clay soil holds water, slowing drainage. Peat moss slows drainage and makes the soil very acidic, which could easily be a big part of your issue. The pH is too acidic for the rose to function properly. Soil is fine in the ground, but usually doesn't drain well enough for pots. Compost can mean virtually anything organic and can stay far too wet for pots. It's what you mix with soil to improve it in the ground, or on top of the soil for mulch. Stick with potting soil in containers. You'll be much happier with the results as long as the stuff you use is a good quality. Kim"

thanks Kim unfortantly i already re potted the rose with topsoil the lady in the garden section told me that its the plainest soil they have on the bag it says screened and composted "A screened, prepared, compost-enriched soil" is what it says on the bag i took out 75% of the fancy soil and replaced with topsoil i mentioned...i think your right this topsoil may stay far to wet for too long but then again that maybe a good thing since soil in pots dry out alot faster then soil in ground i'll update in a week


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RE: rose soil mix..gone wrong help

I'm giggling silently to myself because I did the same thing years ago. Yard dirt in pots. Ever tried to lift one of those pots? That goes in the file of very, very bad ideas. Live & learn.

I don't believe potting soil is packed with anything extra unless you buy the kind that says it is. Soil should be soil unless you're accidentally (or purposely) grabbing a bag that has fertilizer added to it. According to Proven Winners, potting soil is usually just peat moss, pine bark, and perlite or vermiculite.


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RE: rose soil mix..gone wrong

You must have been posting by phone while shopping. I'm too old to keep up with warp speed....lol.

That probably explains why the sentences seemed to be moving past my eyes at Mach 3 also.


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RE: rose soil mix..gone wrong help

say SEIL you said you use "Sta-Green potting mix from Lowes" do you mix it with anything or u just dump it into the pot and add the rose?


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pro mix?

what about this potting mix Seil? follow link

http://www.rona.ca/shop/~soil-planter-soil-pro-mix-386284_!potting-mix_shop


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RE: rose soil mix..gone wrong help

HRose...

I am not Seil, but I have grown a lot of roses in containers and like flaurabuna said, I have found that I got the best results when I kept it simple.

The soil in the link above includes peat, which will increase the acidity of the soil, possibly beyond the acceptable range for roses.

I use the most basic potting soil I can get which happens to be Ace Hardware's store brand. It doesn't contain any fertilizers or anything to hold moisture.

I only use plastic or foam pots. (I have even successfully used the dreaded black nursery pots.) I have used clay pots in the past, but clay holds the heat and wicks moisture from the potting soil, which can stress the plant.

Some roses need to be potted up gradually so that they can develop a good root mass to support the top growth. It's a good rule of thumb, of course, it depends on the rose.

I would avoid any soil that has any kind of fertilizer in the mix. When a rose is first planted, the first thing it does is develop its roots. Those tiny new roots can easily be burned by any fertilizer. In fact, I don't even fertilize the plant until I see it producing new top growth. That tells me that the root system has developed sufficiently to pull moisture up to the top growth of the plant. At that point, the rose can use the nutrients added when you fertilize.

When I do fertilize, I use a diluted solution of liquid fertilizer.

I don't know where you live that makes you so concerned about your pots drying out, but in my climate, the summer temps are in the triple digits weeks at a time. For container plants, I do need to water them daily, but I've never had to water more than once a day even during the very hot summer months. I've never added anything to the potting soil for moisture retention.

As Kim said above, good drainage is vital to successfully growing roses in containers.

Good luck with your rose.

Smiles,
Lyn


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RE: rose soil mix..gone wrong help

Hrose, do your pots seem to dry out quickly? The soil you reference has moisture polymer in it which CAN be too wet for high humidity and high rainfall areas. Here in the desert south west, that's a good thing as it really can help a lot. If you have issues with pots drying out very quickly it might work OK for you. Otherwise, I don't know if I'd use it there.

I've never had issues with the Miracle Gro Soil PRODUCTS themselves and have used MANY bags of the Moisture Control Potting Soil for myself, at work and for private clients. I've raised a few thousand rose seeds in it without issue. I've potted roses in everything from four inch pots to over fifteen gallon can sizes with no issues. I've used it in hanging baskets, vegetable and herb pots, mixed indoor and outdoor pots and all have been very happy. Some have reported burning issues with the fertilizer in their soils, but I've never experienced it in all the years I've used it. I've also used SuperSoil this year with disasterous results. Their soil is FEH! Don't waste your money and plants on SuperSoil. It cakes hard; dries out very quickly; inhibits root formation and has suffered from infestation of fungus gnats in every container I've used it in this spring. None of the other containers or seed boxes have gnats at all, only the SuperSoil filled ones. Kim


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RE: rose soil mix..gone wrong help

hi hrose ,im sorry that this soil mixture isnt right, the only thing that you did differently than me was using clay, and compost. i use a little bone meal in the mix. the clay and compost could have made your mix to heavy. this my original post to you . . .

thisPosted by bobbyb123 none (My Page) on Sat, Jan 21, 12 at 19:36

I would not use that much manure, only use 1/4 portions. The rest equal parts should be fine. My potted ingredents consist of, 4 parts potting soil, 4 parts bagged garden soil, 2 parts peat, 1 part bagged humus, 1 part perlite, 1/4 part bone meal. I know it is a bit over the top. It is a recipe that I slowly developed over the years and is what I finally settled on, and the potted roses love it. Make sure you have plenty of drainage holes on the bottom and dont use a saucer. Give the rose plenty of sun and water and dont expect tons of flowers at first. When good growth begins to happen start feeding with bottled fish fertilizer every couple weeks. Hope this helps bob.


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RE: rose soil mix..gone wrong help

I got this mix from home-depot NATURE MIX the lady there assured me that it will not burn and this mix is made just for potted flowers and doesn't have to be mixed with anything else plus the description on the bag sounds very promising and the soil is not heavy at all so drainage should not be a problem at all

i have just one question a rose is considered to be an Annual right?

" Annual and Perennial soil is to be blended into existing gardens, for new gardens or used exclusively on its own in containers."

http://www.homedepot.ca/product/annual-and-perennial-mix-30-litre/917856

"Nature Mix Annual & Perennial Soil is a 100% natural, certified organic, outdoor soils mixture. This premium quality soil is a blend of peat moss, humus, compost, perlite and vermiculite, scientifically formulated for flowering annual and perennial plants . Annual and Perennial soil is to be blended into existing gardens, for new gardens or used exclusively on its own in containers. Annual and Perennial soil is a special mixture, rich in organic matter providing excellent aeration and drainage while providing your plants with their essential nutrient requirements. Ideal for all flowering annual plants and perennials. Conveniently package in a 30 litre bag, pre-mixed and ready to use.

Enhhances nutrient retention
Rich in organic matter
Provides excellent aeration
Chemical and weed free"

thank you everyone Bob i don't think your mix is for amateurs but thanks anyway


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i will update

I will update in about 2 weeks hopefully i got it right this time...if not i will take the pot and smash it on the street


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RE: rose soil mix..gone wrong help

  • Posted by seil z6b MI (My Page) on
    Fri, May 4, 12 at 23:17

Hrose, I don't mix anything in the soil I buy. It comes right out of the bag and into the pot. Like Lyn, (thanks for the tip, I'll have to check out Ace's soil!) I look for the ones with nothing in it. I want to control the fertilizer and water retention myself. I also use plastic, resin or foam pots. Ceramic and clay pots actually absorb and hold the water so the rose can't get it. Besides they weigh a ton once they're filled with wet soil and a full grown rose! You don't need anything fancy or expensive. Just a lose, light weight, well draining potting soil.

I don't know who that lady was but top soil is not good for roses in pots! It will not drain adequately and your rose will have problems. I'm afraid that in that top soil you're roses are going to have root rot.

The other thing you have to do is make sure there are a lot of drainage holes in the pot and take off any saucers from the bottom. I also keep mine up off the ground by putting them on pot trolleys. All of this is to keep those pots draining easily. I know it's kind of a vicious circle but you need to have very good drainage in the pots even though that means you will have to water them more frequently. Particularly in very hot weather.

No, roses are NOT annuals! They are perennials and should come back for MANY years.

I've never had any problems with the Miracle Grow soils either, Kim. I just won't pay the prices they want so they can have more commercials on TV!

Flaura, you are a kindred spirit, lol! I oh so remember trying to lift those garden soil filled pots!


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RE: rose soil mix..gone wrong help

Nope :) Roses are shrubs and closer to perennials. However, that mix looks good to me, lol! I like them to mention aeration and drainage, and I don't like any weird stuff in them, either.


The ones with special water-holding stuff don't work for the spring here, where too much dampness is a problem. I like spagnum peat moss better for here to help with moisture retention. And sand for more drainage. I get creative in my mixes, though, lol. Anything's better than the brick-hard clay I start with :) I don't use it in container plantings because it acts awfully there.


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RE: rose soil mix..gone wrong help

i re-potted it for the 3rd time this time i lost half the root ball while i was taking it out a chunk of its soil fell off taking half of the plants roots with it...i hope all the stems and leaves survive


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RE: rose soil mix..gone wrong help

  • Posted by seil z6b MI (My Page) on
    Sat, May 5, 12 at 10:07

Oh, I'm sorry to hear that, Hrose! That may have been partially due to that heavier soil too. Top soil has a tendency to clump and cling to the roots. Potting soil is loose and usually just falls away leaving the roots intact.

If it's got a lot of top growth you may want to cut it back some so the smaller root ball doesn't have to stress out so much trying to feed it all.


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RE: rose soil mix..gone wrong help

i say let the roots go into overdrive to make up for lost time here in Canada Ontario we have only 5-6 months of warm weather
and 6-7 months of cold weather


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RE: rose soil mix..gone wrong help

You might want to take your cues from the rose. If the new growth flags, wilts, either mist the plant or consider trimming the wilting soft growth. If the wilting isn't severe, it may recover by itself, particularly if you can shield it from the hottest of the sun. Kim


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RE: rose soil mix..gone wrong help

Good advice as usual from Kim.

The only thing I would add is that the rose roots don't know where they are and can only do what they can do. Less top to support means more energy to the roots whether you are in Canada or Florida. So if your rose starts to wilt and the soil is damp and spraying does not help a judicious trim might be the key to saving a rosy life.


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Wooden Barrel Planters

thanks i appreciate it

what about "Wooden Barrel Planters" 23 Inch it's at home-depot for $34.88 i wonder if i plant a rose bush in it will flourish ? has anyone tired this? ps with the same potting mix of course


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RE: rose soil mix..gone wrong help

The wooden barrels don't last very long here. I don't know how long to suggest it might last there with your increased moisture and cold. There are plastic versions of it which last much longer in this climate. It's a real pain to have that much damp soil with a mature plant in it, then for the blamed container to fall apart in your hands! Kim


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RE: rose soil mix..gone wrong help

Since we are now at the point of giving tips for saving a stressed plant, here's a couple of other thoughts.

Even if you have it planted in a clay or ceramic pot, don't move the rose again. Let it settle in and work towards becoming a strong plant.

I think, the reason you lost those roots is because roses tend to abandon growth that they do not need. Those roots may have already been damaged by being too wet and when you lifted the plant, the rose just let them go. That's a good thing.

you will notice that throughout this thread, people have consistently said that drainage is important. If you can't afford the fancy pot trollies, as mentioned by Seil, just lift the pot with anything, rocks, bricks, pieces of tile, whatever you have around so that it is not sitting on the hardscape.

You might want to site the container in partial shade for a few weeks, if you can, because then it will not have to deal with hot sun.

Most of all, don't kill your rose with kindness. Roses like damp/moist soil, so if you over-water your rose, you are giving the plant more water than it wants/needs.

On a hot day, check the moisture in the pot with your finger and if it is moist/damp, as Kim suggested, just spray the top growth ... no more water in the pot. You may see wilting leaves in the afternoon, but if the soil is damp, all that means is that the transpiration rate/moisture loss, on the top growth is higher than the plants ability to move moisture up to that part of the plant. The spray helps. In the morning, the same plant will look just fine.

Roses in pots can do well even if the soil gets on the dry side once in a while. After all, nature does not water on time and roses are genetically programmed to handle that.

If this were my rose, and this is a personal choice, I would not let it bloom this season. This is your way of forcing the plant to put energy into growing roots and plant. Roses often will sacrifice all to produce blooms. You are in this for the long term, so a season without bloom to create a healthy plant is really a small sacrifice.

Again, good luck with your rose and please post photos when you have finally got a healthy plant.

Smiles,
Lyn


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RE: rose soil mix..gone wrong help

hmmm, there are some differences in terminology between the UK and the US so please forgive but, over here, there are many, many 'potting mixes' which are essentially a mix of peat, coir, composted bark, perlite, base fertiliser, in various proportions, NONE of which I would use for any permanently potted planting. Bedding plants and veggies, for a season, no problem, but, for long term use, there is no substitute for a good loam based mix. here we have the John Innes formulations which are made from turf stacks, rotted down with a small percentage of peat, lime and some base fertiliser - usually enough for around 6 weeks. I amend mine with a little perlite because loam in pots will be in danger of compaction and yes, they are heavy to move. If I could not get John Innes 3, (there are 3 grades based on amount of base nutrients) I would use garden soil and leaf mould in preference to a 'multi-purpose compost'. As my entire garden is basically a pot garden and always has been, it has taken me some time and experimentation....and many frustrating hours trying to water a dry, light compost mix - completely hopeless unless fully immersed (in what- a lake, a swimming pool?). Waterlogged in winter wet, dry as a bone, structure all over the place,horrible inert mat after a whole season....and these are supposedly good quality - not some homestore bargain rotting chipboard. Quite apart from the arguments for and against the use of peat, nearly all potting mixes in the UK are suspect - as far as I know, John Innes formula is the only formula which should be used for longer than one growing season, and even then, the top couple of inches has to be replaced every year. Someone remind me how we have got to this point, where soil, a truly magical substance, has been universally replaced with these denatured mixes which are unethical and frequently inefficient? I dimly recall being warned against pests and diseases from garden soil, but I also know that the bacteria, fungi and insect life are of massive benefit. I certainly add some allotment soil to my home mixes and have used soil from near trees in order to make mycchorhizae. As I said, I am not familiar with the mixes available in the US - there might be others which are primarily loam based (and I don't mean loose topsoil, which we can buy in bags but more usually by the tonne). Yep, I know that plants will 'grow' in anything, even rockwool or clay granules, given food and water, but this is a different question altogether. Which resource is in most risk of depletion - soil (which takes thousands of years to lay down) or peat (same with added implications for carbon release). I guess this is a query for the soil and compost people...but they are a scary lot. I would like to make an informed decision not based on what the horticultural industry wants to sell me, but what is best, environmentally, as well as best for my garden.


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RE: rose soil mix..gone wrong help

hmmm, there are some differences in terminology between the UK and the US so please forgive but, over here, there are many, many 'potting mixes' which are essentially a mix of peat, coir, composted bark, perlite, base fertiliser, in various proportions, NONE of which I would use for any permanently potted planting. Bedding plants and veggies, for a season, no problem, but, for long term use, there is no substitute for a good loam based mix. here we have the John Innes formulations which are made from turf stacks, rotted down with a small percentage of peat, lime and some base fertiliser - usually enough for around 6 weeks. I amend mine with a little perlite because loam in pots will be in danger of compaction and yes, they are heavy to move. If I could not get John Innes 3, (there are 3 grades based on amount of base nutrients) I would use garden soil and leaf mould in preference to a 'multi-purpose compost'. As my entire garden is basically a pot garden and always has been, it has taken me some time and experimentation....and many frustrating hours trying to water a dry, light compost mix - completely hopeless unless fully immersed (in what- a lake, a swimming pool?). Waterlogged in winter wet, dry as a bone, structure all over the place,horrible inert mat after a whole season....and these are supposedly good quality - not some homestore bargain rotting chipboard. Quite apart from the arguments for and against the use of peat, nearly all potting mixes in the UK are suspect - as far as I know, John Innes formula is the only formula which should be used for longer than one growing season, and even then, the top couple of inches has to be replaced every year. Someone remind me how we have got to this point, where soil, a truly magical substance, has been universally replaced with these denatured mixes which are unethical and frequently inefficient? I dimly recall being warned against pests and diseases from garden soil, but I also know that the bacteria, fungi and insect life are of massive benefit. I certainly add some allotment soil to my home mixes and have used soil from near trees in order to make mycchorhizae. As I said, I am not familiar with the mixes available in the US - there might be others which are primarily loam based (and I don't mean loose topsoil, which we can buy in bags but more usually by the tonne). Yep, I know that plants will 'grow' in anything, even rockwool or clay granules, given food and water, but this is a different question altogether. Which resource is in most risk of depletion - soil (which takes thousands of years to lay down) or peat (same with added implications for carbon release). I guess this is a query for the soil and compost people...but they are a scary lot. I would like to make an informed decision not based on what the horticultural industry wants to sell me, but what is best, environmentally, as well as best for my garden.


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RE: rose soil mix..gone wrong help

thank you roseblush1 for the advice

you know the funny thing is i used this exact same soil mix)that was too strong for the potted rose) with two of my in ground roses both climbers and they are not showing any signs of stress or burnt leaves they look very healthy...but it may be to early to tell i'll keep a close eye on them i might have to dig them out if they start to get burnt


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RE: rose soil mix..gone wrong help

The mixture you used in the ground will probably be just fine. Air and water move through the soil where they are MUCH more limited in pots. The ground where all that stuff is remains a fairly constant temperature where that in pots heats up dramatically with the air temps and direct sun on the pots. That heat speeds up chemical and bacterial processes dramatically and causes gasses and other reactions to form faster and in higher concentrations without the air and water exchange they receive in the ground. That can quickly poison any plant in that hotter, more confined potted soil ball. Your garden soil where most of the rose roots are, usually isn't anywhere near as fast draining as the average, decent potting soil. It doesn't have to be because too much fertilizer, too much water can easily spread out over a much larger space, diminishing the ill effects too high concentrations can have, much faster and more efficiently. Confine all those possibilities to a hotter pot, with its limited water and air movement and you exacerbate the potential problems. All the conditions which can result in greater harm, faster, are also what makes potting better for younger plants, pushing them to grow faster, mature faster and flower earlier than they would in the ground. I wouldn't worry about using your original mix in the ground unless you have NO drainage and/or you over water like a fiend. Kim


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RE: rose soil mix..gone wrong help

"water like a fiend" never that would be a waste of water and money


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RE: rose soil mix..gone wrong help

Kim........

I love your posts when you explain why something is happening in the process of growing our roses. I've observed the difference in growing roses in containers and in the ground and do handle them differently, but I have never been able to put what I see and know into words like you do. Thank you for the explaination.

HRose ... I've seen those plastic barrels at HD and my first thought was that the drainage holes are too small for that size of container AND the pot needs a lot more drainage holes.

Smiles,
Lyn


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RE: rose soil mix..gone wrong help

Thank you Lyn, much appreciated. A cordless drill easily makes more and larger holes in plastic pots. Put as many as you want in them. I do it all the time.


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RE: rose soil mix..gone wrong help

I found the name tag its a red hybrid tea OKLAHOMA

any opinions about this rose?


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RE: rose soil mix..gone wrong help

Hi HRose...

Oklahoma is a BIG rose, so it won't be happy in a container for long. Here's a link to the rose page on HelpMeFind. Be sure to read the REFERENCES and MEMBER COMMENTS. You'll find some good information about the rose. AND there are some incredible photos of the blooms, but not too many of the whole plant.

Smiles,
Lyn

Here is a link that might be useful: Oklahoma on HMF


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RE: rose soil mix..gone wrong help

I could only find 3 pictures from the link and they weren't that great i googled the rose and it looks pretty nice happy with the purchase

I read that it doesn't do well in warmer climates so i guess this rose does well in cooler climates like in Canada

How long do you think i could keep this in a pot

info about the pot

Constructed out of fibre clay - a mix of concrete and fibreglass
Features the weight of a clay planter but strength of fibreglass
Measures: 17.5" (45 cm)


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RE: rose soil mix..gone wrong help

The info on the the HMF rose page says it will grow from 4' to 8', so I don't think it's going to be happy in a container. There are some MEMBER COMMENTS about growing this rose in the heat.

Smiles,
Lyn


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RE: rose soil mix..gone wrong help

no i don't mind that it's not a rose for the heat i live in Canada we have about 3 weeks of really warm weather so that's not a problem for me what i want to know is how long can i keep this in my 17.5 inch pot before it gets root bound maybe at 4' or 5'? Seil??


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RE: rose soil mix..gone wrong help

I love it when people say you cannot grow big roses in pots. I have a Mr Lincoln, 8 foot tall last year that is on its 4th year in a pot. It can be done. I have 45 or 50 roses in pots. Almost all Hybrid teas or grandifloras. They are thriving.


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RE: rose soil mix..gone wrong help

How big are the pots and what climate are you growing them in ? In my experience, it really does make a difference.

Smiles,
Lyn


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RE: rose soil mix..gone wrong help

  • Posted by seil z6b MI (My Page) on
    Mon, May 7, 12 at 12:10

I grew the climber Blaze in a big pot for 5 years. It got over 12 feet tall and I just wrapped the canes down to get more laterals. It bloomed it's head off! You can grow almost any rose in a pot if it's big enough and you provide some support for it. I might draw the line at a house eater though, lol!


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RE: rose soil mix..gone wrong help

My pots are not really that big. Maybe 14x14x14. I am in the deep south. Its 90 degrees here. I have a watering system set up to keep them watered all the time.


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RE: rose soil mix..gone wrong help

Seil or anyone with experience how big a pot do you recommend for the Oklahoma rose which can reach 8 ft


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RE: rose soil mix..gone wrong help

I wouldn't worry about a large pot until it gets large enough to warrant it. It's not 8 feet tall yet, right?

I can't remember if it was stated in this thread or another that roses need to develop roots before top growth & blooms, so it's best to match the pot size to the size of a new plant. You can always re-pot it later if it starts to outgrow its home.

Like you said, you have a shorter growing season so your Oklahoma may not reach the proportions is does elsewhere. Also consider how willing you'll be at the end of the season to lug around a gigantic pot if you choose to move it to shelter or an area where it's more protected during winter.


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RE: rose soil mix..gone wrong help

  • Posted by seil z6b MI (My Page) on
    Tue, May 8, 12 at 10:22

This is a picture of my big pots.
Tree Rose Winterized
The pot is about 2 feet wide and 2 feet tall.


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RE: rose soil mix..gone wrong help

hey! That terra cotta colored pot in the background is the same type I use. LOL Grow many roses in those!


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RE: rose soil mix..gone wrong help

thanks for the picture and thanks everyone i appreciate all the help i will share pictures once the rose is big enough with many blooms


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