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OT but one more reason not to move things illegally.

Posted by roseseek z 10, SoCal (My Page) on
Mon, Jun 9, 14 at 21:29

Another scary infestation, this time attacking nearly three-hundred tree species. Kim

Here is a link that might be useful: Tree beetle infestation


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: OT but one more reason not to move things illegally.

Gee who was it that opened pandora's box?
Everytime you turn around there is an insect whom either is doing harm to plant-life or is causing diseases in humans. :-/


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RE: OT but one more reason not to move things illegally.

That article is really sad.


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RE: OT but one more reason not to move things illegally.

Wow. Wonder how it got here and how it spreads


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RE: OT but one more reason not to move things illegally.

  • Posted by hoovb z9 Southern CA (My Page) on
    Tue, Jun 10, 14 at 15:14

It was right in the article.

"Stouthamer's genetic analysis traced the bugs to Vietnam.

Experts aren't sure how the beetle made its way to the U.S. Invasive species around the world are moved on human cargo, in clothes, in wooden shipping pallets and in boats' ballast water."

That's really sad. Hopefully there is a predator that attacks only that pest and that can be brought here and released. It is how the eugenia psyllid has now been brought under reasonable control.

Likely in shipping pallets, or people smuggling plants in.


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RE: OT but one more reason not to move things illegally.

Yes indeed - I practically wet my knickers on coming across a citrus borer in my woods. We already have the large saperda poplar borer (have weekly frass inspections) and had to report it to Defra immediately.
Global food networks and cheap air travel - we are reeling from chalara decimating our ash trees (Dutch Elm all over again) - no cure.
Will be going a little crazy with the chainsaws..........


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RE: OT but one more reason not to move things illegally.

Once we started going to the University Library and reading plant pathology papers (and getting distracted by other articles in those journals), we started wondering what food supplies were going to be available in a couple of hundred years, if not in a couple of decades.

Then we drove out to Missouri and the monocultural agriculture out there started scaring us big time.

(Anybody ever wonder if the rubber ducks used in the 'races' that are used as money raisers are sterilized of zebra mussel larvae as they are moved between rivers?)


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