Return to the Roses Forum | Post a Follow-Up

 o
double knockout rose in container on hot patio..ugggh

Posted by JaclynDee NC (My Page) on
Sun, Jul 13, 14 at 3:58

My boyfriend proudly bought me this double knockout rose last week that he got on clearance. I planted it into a container and it started blooming a few days ago.
I've never had double knockout roses and wasn't expecting one. It's pretty but needs pruning, I think. It's about 1.5 feet tall. It gets full sun only in the afternoon (4p - 8p), which I understand is not ideal but I rent an apartment so my options for placement are limited.

What should I do with this guy? Prune it? Let it be?

I haven't fertilized it. I used Miracle Gro potting soil and peat mix, and put some pine straw mulch on top (though not much). I watered it every day until today. I stuck my finger in the soil and it was slightly moist.

I think it could be pretty, but I just don't know what it needs. Or perhaps this is normal for the first year? Thanks for any suggestions!


Follow-Up Postings:

 o
RE: double knockout rose in container on hot patio..ugggh

I would plant it in a much larger pot and leave it there for a month or two to develop a good root system and enough new growth so that I could decide whether it needed pruning or not.

I'm not sure what you expect, but Double Knock Outs are not cute little mini roses intended for small pots. My two Double Knock Outs are 4-6 ft tall (the one in more shade is the taller one) and are about 3.5 ft wide. My one in more shade does not bloom as often as the one in full sun. So if you can't provide at least 6 hours of sun, your Knock Out (like mine) may try to grow larger (searching for more sun?) and not bloom as often as you'd like.

I also might not water it every day unless it is super hot there. Water only when needed and make sure the drainage is good.

Perhaps some of our more experienced container growing gardeners will come along and add some more advice.

Good luck.

Kate


 o
RE: double knockout rose in container on hot patio..ugggh

  • Posted by seil z6b MI (My Page) on
    Sun, Jul 13, 14 at 14:14

Kate's advice is all good. KOs are full size roses and that pot is not big enough to keep it happy for long. That's probably why it's drying out so quickly too. In a larger pot you could soak it good about once a week instead of a little water every day. The rose will do better for you that way. If temps get VERY HOT then you might need to water it more often.

As for pruning, since it's so new I'd wait a while and see how it's going to grow and fill out. Besides it needs the leaves to produce food to be healthy. So you don't want to take off a lot of leaf yet. Just dead head the blooms as they die and let the plant grow out some before you decide how you want to shape it.


 o
RE: double knockout rose in container on hot patio..ugggh

  • Posted by jim1961 6a Central Pa. (My Page) on
    Sun, Jul 13, 14 at 15:55

I do not know if this applies to Double Ko's in containers but I let our Double Ko's grow for 2-3 years before doing any major pruning. I prune out winter-kill in the Spring of course or any cane damage.
(Our D - Ko's are in the ground)

I'm not much of a rose container person so my knowledge is limited but I agree a larger container should be used for a Double Knockout...

(Red version of Double Ko in the ground....)

 photo IMG_1052_zps6505bb28.jpg


 o
RE: double knockout rose in container on hot patio..ugggh

Thanks for your responses! I'm so glad, because I was going to put her in a SMALLER pot until I read your comments! (Turns out I misunderstood an article, thinking it said a 15 in pot would be good. It actually said a 15 GALLON pot. Oops!)

I can only give it 4-5 hours of sun until I move in October. I really hope I can plant it in the ground at that time.

Just a couple more questions, if any of you get back here:

1. What is the smallest size pot that Rosy might find acceptable?

2. Would any type of pot work? The clay pot is too heavy.

3. I live in North Carolina - it's a blazing 94 degrees today! High humidity also. I'm assuming that's hot enough for daily watering? (80's last week - I only watered daily b/c I felt no moisture with finger. I think the clay pot was stealing water, because it often felt moist to touch. I'll drill extra holes in the bottom of my new pot for better drainage.)

4. I'll avoid pruning, other than necessary removal of dead or dying areas. I'll just keep an eye on her and let her flower into herself. Is it okay to neglect fertilizing, too, at least for the 1st year?

Thanks again! I appreciate your advice. And Jim - your roses are beautiful! I hope mine will look like that!


 o
RE: double knockout rose in container on hot patio..ugggh

Thanks for your responses! I'm so glad, because I was going to put her in a SMALLER pot until I read your comments! (Turns out I misunderstood an article, thinking it said a 15 in pot would be good. It actually said a 15 GALLON pot. Oops!)

I can only give it 4-5 hours of sun until I move in October. I really hope I can plant it in the ground at that time.

Just a couple more questions, if any of you get back here:

1. What is the smallest size pot that Rosy might find acceptable?

2. Would any type of pot work? The clay pot is too heavy.

3. I live in North Carolina - it's a blazing 94 degrees today! High humidity also. I'm assuming that's hot enough for daily watering? (80's last week - I only watered daily b/c I felt no moisture with finger. I think the clay pot was stealing water, because it often felt moist to touch. I'll drill extra holes in the bottom of my new pot for better drainage.)

4. I'll avoid pruning, other than necessary removal of dead or dying areas. I'll just keep an eye on her and let her flower into herself. Is it okay to neglect fertilizing, too, at least for the 1st year?

Thanks again! I appreciate your advice. And Jim - your roses are beautiful! I hope mine will look like that!


 o
RE: double knockout rose in container on hot patio..ugggh

  • Posted by jim1961 6a Central Pa. (My Page) on
    Mon, Jul 14, 14 at 20:33

Roses in pots need fertilized every so often depending on what type of fertilizer you use. That step can not be skipped when using pots.
I think clay pots get to hot and may bake your rose roots.
I like to use plastic light colored pots but opinions vary.

And yes 94 degrees you probably will have to water daily at least once.

I do not know actual pot sizes that should be used so someone else will have to answer that question...

This post was edited by jim1961 on Mon, Jul 14, 14 at 20:39


 o
RE: double knockout rose in container on hot patio..ugggh

Target has really large plastic pots on clearance right now. I'm not sure how many gallons the large one is but it'd be worth checking out if you have one nearby. The largest one is like $9.


 o
RE: double knockout rose in container on hot patio..ugggh

  • Posted by seil z6b MI (My Page) on
    Tue, Jul 15, 14 at 12:02

A 15 gallon pot should be large enough and plastic is fine. I don't use clay any more either because of the weight and they won't winter here without cracking. Make sure there are several good sized drainage holes and do not use a tray on the bottom that will hold water in at the base of the pot. Even though you have to water frequently roses do not like to have their roots sitting in water. The trays will hold water up in the bottom of the pot and cause the roots to rot. If you can find a wheeled pot trolley put it up on that so it will drain freely.

In 94 degree heat you will need to water daily. Pots do dry out a little quicker than the ground would. And, yes, clay pots do steal water from the roots because they're so absorbent.

Do fertilizer at least once a month. Roses use a lot of nutrients to bloom frequently. And being in a pot you automatically will wash some nutrients out when you water. It's sort of a catch 22. You have to water more often but then that washes out the nutrients so you have to fertilize more often too.

Next spring when it comes out of dormancy you should be able to shape it more to your liking. But roses don't grow into perfect little rounded shrubs ever, lol. They pretty much decide on their own how and where they want to grow.


 o
RE: double knockout rose in container on hot patio..ugggh

There's a Target just down the road - I'll definitely check that out tomorrow. Something cheap would be great since I don't plan to keep it potted forever.

I'm excited about this rose plant! The challenge of helping it thrive is fun. I'm gonna replant to a bigger pot, make sure it drains well, and then I'll make sure it gets fed and watered using the tips you've given me. Other than that, I'll just let it do it's thing.

Thanks everybody for your great advice. Also thanks for not scolding me for not looking through older posts for similar information! It takes me forever to do that, because I get carried off into other topics so easily. So thanks again, this is a great forum.

Jaclyn


 o
RE: double knockout rose in container on hot patio..ugggh

  • Posted by vasue 7A Charlottesville (My Page) on
    Wed, Jul 16, 14 at 16:14

A 15-gallon pot is likely to be 18" across & nearly as high. If concerned about water stains from a pot standing on deck or balcony, you might pick up pot feet as an alternative to a wheeled dolley. They fit under the bottom rim to raise the pot, run a couple of dollars each & you'd need four for a pot that size. Usually found with the pots outside, as they also keep a pot from freezing to a bottom surface & cracking. Often use them & just slide a saucer beneath for water to drain to which can be emptied & removed in between waterings. Might consider using a few inches of mulch atop the soil to keep it cooler & delay moisture evaporation (kept from touching the stems) & pine straw for that is fine. Also keeps soil from splashing out in watering or rain.

The potting mix you used contains slow-release fertilizer, but as others have noted, you'll need quick-release fertilizer for pots as well. The rule of thumb is "weakly, weekly" meaning fertilizer diluted in water at 1/4 the concentration on the bottle for monthly feeding, given weekly by pouring on soil already moist. Some of the fertilizers are very salty & can build up a residue on top of the soil & interior of the pot. Prefer fish emulsion myself.

What a romantic gesture from your boyfriend! Sounds like he's a keeper, just like your rose...

Here is a link that might be useful: General soil capacity pot sizes


 o
RE: double knockout rose in container on hot patio..ugggh

Vasue - I think you read my mind! I had been thinking about what to use other than a wheeled trolley, since there's really not much space on my patio to wheel it anywhere, lol. I hadn't heard of pot feet, but that's perfect. I'll look for those.

Also, the information on fertilizing will be very helpful. I already have the fertilizer, so I'll use that and see how it goes. I'm going to plant this rose into it's new container this evening.

My boyfriend is pretty sweet, yes. But the man lights up for clearance and sale items, and sometimes buys stuff just because it's on sale (hence, the knockout roses). I gave up trying to correct that habit long ago. LOL. It's okay though, because I think he's getting better at picking things out, even if they're not needed. For example, the rose brings me joy and I'm learning from it - which is much better than the "extra" luggage set and the "extra" microwave he bought last year. : ))

Thanks for your tips!


 o
RE: double knockout rose in container on hot patio..ugggh

  • Posted by vasue 7A Charlottesville (My Page) on
    Thu, Jul 17, 14 at 12:24

Jacklyn, the pot feet are great for stationary pots/planters & can be inconspicuous or decorative. Link below shows some examples - the figural feet come in many varieties - as well as low plant stands which are like trivets for flowerpots. Most of mine are what they're calling the "Victorian" shape but have a fired-on glaze, which further protects them from freezing. (If the feet are used to protect the pot bottom from freezing to a surface, you don't want the feet themselves freezing & cracking or the pot falls over, canceling out the whole point of their use!) Have some of the bird ones from a sale, but they're replaced as the temp chills with the glazed for Winter. Only 3 are needed but 4 are sturdier. Local Lowes carries the whitewash glazed & plain with their outdoor pot display, usually in a small cardboard box on the shelf near the terra cotta & ceramic pots. Some of the neighboring nurseries carry the more decorative ones at prices equivalent to what the market will bear, and a slew of designs available online.

Your boyfriend reminds me of my husband - just never know what he'll happen upon on sale & bring home! Must admit, his back-ups of certain items have come in remarkably handy over the years...

Here is a link that might be useful: Examples of pot feet

This post was edited by vasue on Thu, Jul 17, 14 at 12:29


 o
RE: double knockout rose in container on hot patio..ugggh

I meant to reply much earlier, but it didn't happen! Thanks for the info on pot feet. The link pulled up zero results? I'm gonna check the website out though, in just awhile. Pot feet or a trivet would be perfect for it.

I replanted to a 20 inch pot, resin I think (wonderfully light and easy to handle). The Target in my area didn't have much, but I purchased one from Lowe's for $15. Drilled extra holes in the bottom, too.

It looks good so far! I was wondering if I should fertilize right away, or let it establish a bit first? I used miracle gro potting mix with peat mix, and layered pine straw on the surface. It rained hard today and it's definitely had it's fill of water for a bit.

Thank you for all the great advice!


 o
RE: double knockout rose in container on hot patio..ugggh

Sorry for not seeing this earlier. I grow double Knockouts (among other roses) in containers on a hot patio north of you in DC. I use the largest containers I can find, which are about 24": in diameter.

I would leave your rose alone (except for watering and fertilizing of course) until next Spring. It shouldn't need to be pruned by then, either.

You should re-pot it in late Winter when it is still bare--or mostly bare. However, these are tough, tough roses and can take a whole lot of abuse. They can also grow in more shade than other roses require, but do better the more sun they have. I have been in the process of painting my resin pots (which are about 15 years old and quite banged-up looking) and replanting my roses. I recently replanted a double Knockout after the Spring flush and it is now going gangbusters.

I use flat saucers under my pots to keep dirt off the patio (I'm in a rental apartment, too) and also use plant caddies to keep the whole thing off the ground. Big Lots carries some nice flat metal ones cheap. The caddies also make the pots easier to move.

I don't use clay pots for any of my perennials because of the cracking issue. I have some smaller ones I use for annuals and empty them out before the first frost.

Hope this helps.


 o
RE: double knockout rose in container on hot patio..ugggh

Hi Barb, thanks for your advice. I already replanted to a 20in pot though. I'm glad to hear that someone else in nearby territory is having luck growing them on an apartment patio!

I decided to go ahead and fertilize it. It's holding up well so far. No blooms, as they were spent so I removed them before replanting. But that's okay, I figure it needs to establish a good root system anyway.

I'm also glad to hear they are tough plants and can withstand a little abuse (less than adequate sunlight and conditions etc.) because I really hope to replant in the ground, when I buy a home (hopefully soon).

Thanks again!


 o Post a Follow-Up

Please Note: Only registered members are able to post messages to this forum.

    If you are a member, please log in.

    If you aren't yet a member, join now!


Return to the Roses Forum

Information about Posting

  • You must be logged in to post a message. Once you are logged in, a posting window will appear at the bottom of the messages. If you are not a member, please register for an account.
  • Posting is a two-step process. Once you have composed your message, you will be taken to the preview page. You will then have a chance to review your post, make changes and upload photos.
  • After posting your message, you may need to refresh the forum page in order to see it.
  • Before posting copyrighted material, please read about Copyright and Fair Use.
  • We have a strict no-advertising policy!
  • If you would like to practice posting or uploading photos, please visit our Test forum.
  • If you need assistance, please Contact Us and we will be happy to help.


Learn more about in-text links on this page here