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Florist Varieties Available as Bareroots

Posted by rosybunny 8B (My Page) on
Thu, Sep 12, 13 at 3:49

As I have done a lot of searching here without much success, I finally decided to ask:

What are the bareroot florist roses available for retail customers?

I found out about the Freelander series too late, Palatine stopped selling them as bareroots. Besides Sonia and Mr. Lincoln, I don't know any other florist variety that I can easily get.

Dear Kim, I saw in another thread where you mentioned "Kordes has other much better varieties for cutting" (it was a thread on Freelanders), I'm dead curious what those other varieties are.


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Florist Varieties Available as Bareroots

I just googled "florist roses" and a bunch of articles & stuff came up - one great article from HMF - you might like to read it.

Jackie


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RE: Florist Varieties Available as Bareroots

Are you looking specifically for "florist" varities, or would hybrid teas that have "florist" or exhibition form do? There aren't many "florist" varieties that are out there now. We did have a discussion at the link Jackie provided. You can get a few from Wisconsin Roses. Palatine has Red Intuition. In zone 8, you might be able to handle roses on Fortuniana rootstock. K&M Roses may have some. Otherwise, exhibition quality HTs might suit your needs/desires/wishes. Check out roseshow.com for the best varieties.


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RE: Florist Varieties Available as Bareroots

Hi rosebunny, might you please have the link to the thread you mentioned? It isn't ringing a bell... Thanks. Kim


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RE: Florist Varieties Available as Bareroots

I grow two Kordes florist, or former florist roses, and they are simply dreadful here in my growing conditions. I'm sure that's why they are hard to find--other people probably had problems, too. Party Dress is a petal packed pale pink with old fashioned form. This last spring every one of its blooms balled--not a single decent bloom to be had. Thrips love it, and PD hates heat, wind, rain, dry air--just weather in general. It's meant for the greenhouse, not my desert. The plant is fine, but then there are no fungal disease problems here, either. Repeat has been terrible, too. The second rose, Caramel Antique, a petal packed goldish yellow with "caramel colored" center, doesn't ever ball and lasts forever in the vase--if there are enough successful blooms to put in a vase. However, every bug in creation loves this rose, and most of the centers of buds and blooms are eaten away. A lot of it looks like thrips damage. I will keep CA for the time being. I have had both roses for several years. So, for me these two roses didn't work, but they could, perhaps, for someone else under different conditions. Diane


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RE: Florist Varieties Available as Bareroots

Dear Jackie: Thanks for looking it up for me, I have certainly googled this subject in many ways, don't know how I missed this article!

Dear Diane: Thank you for the info on the sources! Yes I should have been more clear about what I'm looking for, which is roses that I can use for making bouquets for home uses and for sale, what HMF defines as good for cutting may not be good enough is what I found. For instance Peace, it is unfitting for arrangement purposes as its stems are short and its blooms would not open when cut. If these short-comings are merely caused by the growing conditions, perhaps in time I will be able to correct them, but for now I would like to obtain some florist varieties for their following qualities:

Long, straight and strong stems

Good lasting power in the vase (7 days)

Quick to rebloom

Interesting form or color

I have tried to get recommendations from Roses Unlimited but it looks like they have too many roses to give me a full list of their florist varieties, I would need to tell them the names of the varieties I want.

Since Kordes allegedly dominate the European cut flower market, I would love to know which Kordes outside Freelander and Fairy Tale series can be grown as florist roses.


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RE: Florist Varieties Available as Bareroots

Diane: I read about your Kordes in another thread, I'm so sorry they didn't turn out well. I am still intrigued to try my luck with some Kordes b/c on paper they seem just perfect for my desire to make great rose bouquets. I plan on getting Fatasia Mondiale Freelander and Floral + Kosmos Fairy Tale from RU in spring.

As for thrips, I wonder if those blue-colored sticky traps could defeat them?

Kim, my apology for a false memory that you had said Kordes has other better varieties for cutting than Antique Caramel. It was Newrose who said that in the following thread.

Here is a link that might be useful: Kordes Sweet Antiq. Freelander


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RE: Florist Varieties Available as Bareroots

Thanks, rosebunny. No worries. I thought I was losing it a bit when I couldn't figure out what I might have said! LOL! Thanks. Kim


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RE: Florist Varieties Available as Bareroots

I bought White Majesty last year from Rosemania and it is a very nice white. It is supposed to be a better growing version of a popular florists rose. The pink tips have only happened in cooler temps but flowers formed all through summer.

Eternal flame is a good long stemmed rose with few thorns. Lovely shape on the buds but a very tall plant here.


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RE: Florist Varieties Available as Bareroots

Kordes has never marketed either the Freelander or Fairy Tale series as florist roses per se. Freelanders, for instance, are marketed as "outdoor cut roses". The goal in developing that series was to produce hardy GARDEN roses having long stems and extended vase life.

Examine the current "stable" of Kordes's actual florist roses in the attached link. Perhaps you will find a few names that appear on the catalog lists of U.S. suppliers.

Here is a link that might be useful: Kordes Cut Rose Varieties


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RE: Florist Varieties Available as Bareroots

If blackspot is not a terrible fail for you, you might take a look at Poulsen's Renaissance roses. I have/had a few of these and have to say they are not to my taste but they undoubtably fulfill your criteria for cutting. Long stems - yep. Last in a vase - easily over a week. Interesting forms - well, they tend to be a classic HT shape with extra petals. They do grow vigorously upright, making enormous 2m tall shrubs (and almost as wide.....so not suitable for pot culture and would not need many to fill a greenhouse.....but, if you either spray or are not infested with BS, they may be extremely good roses for your requirements. Oh yeah, being so vigorous, you can cut many stems each flush and although they only have an average rebloom cycle, they can pump out the blooms with food and water needs fulfilled.
I have Millie (or Ghita), Phillipa and Claire/Liliana (they seem to have multiple names).


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RE: Florist Varieties Available as Bareroots

Kordes Fairy Tale roses work very well for me, but they aren't good as cut flowers.

I highly recommend that you look at the hybrid tea varieties listed at roseshow.com. These are varieties grown by exhibitors for form, long stems, and vase life. There isn't really such a thing as "quick rebloom" in rose life, especially if you want long stems. To get a lot of stems of one variety, you need to grow a lot of plants of that variety (4 - 5 minimum). I don't know where you are located, but if you have blackspot pressures in your area, these will need a regular treatment for blackspot. Google photos of "rose show", and you will find photos of the types of roses that are exhibited at the shows.


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RE: Florist Varieties Available as Bareroots

I'm not familiar with florist roses, or growing them. But while I was checking out a couple websites (as recommended by some memebers here) I noticed they had a rather large list of florist roses available. Kand M roses and cool roses . Both state plants are grafted and both do year round shipping. Not sure if this helps, but I figured it can't hurt to try. ;)
Good luck!
-Lyna


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RE: Florist Varieties Available as Bareroots

Duplicate

This post was edited by Alwayzbgrateful on Sun, Sep 15, 13 at 0:10


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RE: Florist Varieties Available as Bareroots

I did a search for you on hortico.com website. They are a mail order nursery in Canada that ships to the U.S.. The search yielded 13 pages of "good cut" Hybrid Teas which included these: (the notes are from my own experience)
Marilyn Monroe' huge orange blend roses, with good petal substance (relates to a long vase life), glossy foliage was very disease resistant in my neighbors no-spray garden.
'Tiffany' a classic florists rose. Pink with yellow base, very fragrant. vase life is c. 5 days where I live in California.
Alecs' Red' although this cultivar has somewhat shorter stems, c. 4 to 5" long, it is quite floriferous, and very fragrant. Tends to "blue" after a long spell. Long lasting roses on the plant and in the vase.
Caroline de Monaco' an ultra-modern H.T. , thick petal substance.
Countess Vandal' very lovely, another classic H.T., but not as long lasting in the vase as the roses listed above.
Dr. Brownell' Big rounded roses in mass profusion. Yellow blend with peachy tones. very floriferous.
Majestic
Chris Evert ' bright yellow.
Golden Jubilee
Artistry

that's just a few. There are a few that they listed in their search list for "good cut" H.T.s that have a shorter vase life (of course) here in california than in canada. Those included 'Just Joey" and 'Blue Moon' (thin petal substance= lasts 3 to 5 days in a vase where I live near San Francisco.
The rose that lasted longest in a vase out of 200+ roses, that we grew in our garden was Tournament of Roses' a Grandiflora my mother gave me. 10 to 14 days depending on air temperature. Short stems, though.
Good luck,
luxrosa


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Tournament has pretty fragrance too and the color shifts in a pretty way depending on temperature so its always fun to see what it will be that week


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Kosmos Fairy Tale is beautiful but, as stated above, doesn't last well in a vase...at all. It lasts just a shade longer than an Austin...which is about a day.
Red Eden, if you can keep the blooms from balling, has exceptional substance and vase life for me.
Folklore is very good...Saint Patrick is very good as well. Neptune seems to do well, and Francis Meilland.
I have *heard* Firefighter and Veteran's Honor make great cut flowers, but I don't have mine yet.
My Royal Highness is putting out its first blooms and they are not only wonderfully fragrant but seem to have good substance, so I'm optimistic about how they'll do as cut flowers.
Hope you find what you're looking for!


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RE: Florist Varieties Available as Bareroots

  • Posted by maryl Z7 Okla. (My Page) on
    Sat, Sep 14, 13 at 18:52

Don't forget Tineke (white) and Olympiad (red). Both started out life as florist roses and were found adaptable to garden culture. I remember cutting a dozen or so of Olympiad, doing a quick recut inside the house and then a plop into the water in a vase. Nothing complicated. The flowers lasted so long I was about sick of them - a good two weeks. Olympiad flowers best in the cool spring/fall weather..........Maryl


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You guys are so wonderful, makes me very happy that I asked the question here!

Okay, so now the two "flagships" in my initial plan have sunken before the voyage has begun: Freelanders are unavailable (wrote to Greenheart and got no word back), Fariy Tales are no good cut .

I am so glad Alec's Red and Tournament of Roses were mentioned, b/c some folks said they perform very well in heat, have strong fragrance and last a long time cut, I was quite tempted, but now that I know about the 4"-5" stems--no different from my Peace--I have to scratch them off the list as well. KITTYMOONBEAM: what's the length of stems on your Tournament? (still feeling tempted...)

Just Joey is not good cut???? What a disappointment!

My gratitude to everyone for your help and advice. Truth be told I am not eager to acquire another white as I don't need more white for my arrangements. I have Honor, not the most exciting bloom but it's a winner as a cutting rose. It's prolific (5-12 blooms at one time with another 12+ buds growing, yet the plant is only 4' by 2'), quick to repeat (about 1-3 weeks when I feed it well), OPENS COMPLETELY IN THE VASE (most of my other roses failed to do so this year), has a delightful clear scent. So for me to get another white, it'll have to be rather special, I already have a strong candidate in mind: Callista, allegedly has super quick repeats, strong fragrance, also it's not a yellow-tone white like Honor (a magnet to cucumber beetles). Anyone grows Callista???

Luxrosa, I can't believe Tiffany, as a florist type rose, only lasts 5 days for you. I live 4hr north of SFO, right outside the fog belt, if it doesn't last for you, it won't last for me.

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Can anyone tell me if I should try any of these for cutting? Any of them doesn't do well in heat? I also don't like monster sized blooms, 3"-5.5" is great.

Austins: Mustead Wood, Mary Rose, Geoff Hamilton [longing for an Austin :(

Heaven on Earth [was dying to have it but saw too many photos of its blooms drooping!]

Golden Celebration [nodding? heard great things about it since my day 1 on this forum]

Abbaye de cluny [very fragrant, hardy and vigorous? long sturdy stems?]

Bride's Dream

Neptune [long sturdy tems? prolific?]

Diamond Jubilee

Rouge Royale [planning to get this one]

From Palatine: Traviata, Acropolis, Sweet Victoria

Am going to ask Roses Unlimited if they have any Renaissance varieties.

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Wishing everyone a sweet weekend.

RosyBunny


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RE: Florist Varieties Available as Bareroots

  • Posted by maryl Z7 Okla. (My Page) on
    Sun, Sep 15, 13 at 13:15

I've grown Rouge Royale for many years now and it is one of my favorite reds. Blooms do well in a vase but last only about 3 days max on the bush (which is a bit odd but true). It is vigorous, and very fragrant. It does have acceptable stem length. Because the blooms can be very large it doesn't take a dozen of them to make a perfumed statement in a vase.....Aside from Olympiad, I might add that another good red for the vase, as has been mentioned previously, is Veteran's Honor. You might want to check it out also.......Maryl


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Golden Celebration is a great rose, but I wouldn't say it is a cutting rose. I use it for bouquets a lot, but Julia Child outlasts GC in the vase (yes, good, old Julia). Trouble is Julia has mostly short stemmed clusters of blooms, but my Julias have enough long stems here and there to use in bouquets very nicely, and if you pick a bloom early it does last. Abbaye de Cluny isn't a cutting rose, either, though sometimes it lasts fairly well. It's more timing and luck on that one. Heaven on Earth was the only rose I have grown that spontaneously started to die back a few years ago, and after a summer of this, I put it out of its misery. It's a lovely looking rose, but is floppy and nods. It improved a little with age, but I wouldn't recommend it--though others may love it and have much better luck with HonE than I did. As far as Munstead Wood goes, mine looks like it might have great potential as a cutting rose--it's certainly lovely enough--but it's still too young to make that judgment. I wish I could name an Austin I have experience with that would make a great cut flower, but can't think of one right now. I'm sure others might come up with a few. Then there is the beauteous Evelyn...sturdy stems, gorgeous blooms, but I never know which bloom is going to last. Diane


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I have found it easiest to just go to Costco (if you happen to be a member, if not, then a florist or a supermarket) and buy a dozen roses of a color that I love. I then root them at home and plant them in my garden the next spring. I have done this many times and I have a great garden section just for cutting because of it. The only annoying thing is that I don't know the names of any of the roses that I have done this with (not that it's so important, but I'd still like to know:)
Maude


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RE: Florist Varieties Available as Bareroots

Maude80, Please give us a detailed lesson on your rooting technique. Thanks in advance.


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Maude, if you call the florist from whom you got the florist rose, they can tell you what its name is.

Kate


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I cut quite a few roses to bring in every weekend. My absolute favorite cut rose is Falling in Love. Lasts forever in the vase, but it has vicious thorns and not always the longest of stems. Chris Evert was mentioned in an earlier post…I love this one cut, too, but again not always long stems for cutting. Of the roses I grow, the ones that consistently give me really long cutting stems, good fragrance, long lasting cut and good repeat bloom are Paris de Yves St Laurent (which I believe is a florist rose; fragrance seems stronger in bud form than when the flower fully opens, but the blooms last forever), Dolly Parton (really huge blooms, so might not be to your liking), Perfume Delight, Heart of Gold (only my second year growing this one; was stingy with blooms the first year, but has been in almost constant bloom for me this year) and Firefighter (Veteran’s Honor does last longer cut, but fragrance isn’t strong to me; FF is highly fragrant and in almost constant bloom for me). I could list a bunch of others that are good cut roses for me, but those are the ones that I grow that seem to most meet your requirements. Below are a few bush shots of them to give you an idea of the stem lengths, etc:

PdYSL

 photo zzzpdysl0810a_zps4f78ed76.jpg

and a close up of PdYSL

 photo zzzpdysl0905_zps976c01ed.jpg

Firefighter

 photo zzzff0817_zpsc003f322.jpg

Heart of Gold

 photo zzzhog0916a_zpsec1701d8.jpg

Perfume Delight

 photo zzzpd0830_zps4f160609.jpg

 photo zzzpd0907a_zps501ba480.jpg

Dolly Parton

 photo zzzdp0907_zps4a42ebbf.jpg

 photo zzzdp0815d_zps52a09dc8.jpg

And here’s a pic (a bit blurry) I took this morning of Firefighter, Royal Amethyst (new for me this year…always blooming, but so far doesn’t last long enough cut to meet your criteria) and Heart of Gold all cut Saturday morning and currently residing in a 7” tall vase that’s way too short for them…lol

 photo zzzcuttings0916_zps9704723b.jpg


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I remember reading on this forum that some people have success with Golden Gate, a Kordes climber/cut rose.


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RE: Florist Varieties Available as Bareroots

Jaxondel, my propagating method is pretty standard and similar to what you often read here. I will take a stem, cut off the flower, and leave two sets of leaves on the stem. Then I make several vertical slits through the lower part of the stem with a razor blade. I have found that stabbing completely through the stem gives the best results.

I then dip the stems in powdered rooting hormone and then place them in soil that I have already poked holes in (so that the rooting hormone doesn't rub off). I seal this in a clear plastic bag and wait a few weeks.

I can usually tell if they are going to survive after about ten days by looking at the leaves. The ones that aren't going to make it usually drop their leaves after they turn yellow. The ones that do make it retain their original ones. I take them out of the bag after they have developed roots (I always plant them in clear cups so I can determine this)...

As far as finding out the name, for some reason Costco won't reveal the exact source of their roses. Also, there are so many different ones that look like the ones I grow that it would be hard to describe it to a florist anyway:)

Maude


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Dear Pat, Thank you so much for your photos, I particularly LOVE the last one, that's exactly the kind of blooms I'm looking for, it makes my spine itch just looking at them :-p

As it happens, today I just started my first rose propagation experiment, Maude's notes made me realize the mistakes I made: a. I didn't cut through the stems, merely scraping off the surface layer and making shallow slits as I thought what matters is the green layer gets exposed; b. I used a liquid hormone, and after soaking the stems, I put them in a vase with water in it, which probably means the hormone got washed off before the next step....oh well, didn't have high hopes for it anyways, just for curiosity's sake.

I've turned onto the Renaissance series at the moment...was checking them out on Hortico's site just now. Are all the Renaissance varieties good cutters like you described, Campanula?? (I know Clair is a good cutter, I've read that sophia and julia are also good, HMF doesn't say Bonita is good for cutting, but again I no longer completely trust HMF on this topic)


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