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New University of Georgia Rose Rosette Virus article

Posted by henry_kuska z5 OH (kuska@neo.rr.com) on
Tue, Oct 9, 12 at 15:51

October 8, 2012 article by Paul Pugliese, an agriculture & natural resources agent for the University of Georgia Cooperative Extension office in Bartow County.

http://www.caes.uga.edu/applications/gafaces/?public=viewStory&pk_id=4554

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The University of Georgia also has a 2011 general rose growing article "Roses in Georgia: Selecting and Growing Techniques" at:

http://www.caes.uga.edu/Publications/pubDetail.cfm?pk_id=7941&pg=np&ct=roses virus&kt=&kid=&pid=

Here is a link that might be useful: Rose Rosette Virus Oct, 2012 article


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: New University of Georgia Rose Rosette Virus article

Sadly, there is nothing new in the article.


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RE: New University of Georgia Rose Rosette Virus article

I believe he is generally incorrect to say that RRD foliage will be smaller than normal. On modern roses, in the early stages, it is more likely to be the same size as or larger than normal and with a crumpled texture. On infected multiflora I've seen, foliage was smaller. Also RoundUp tends to reduce the development of leaves to thin straps.


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RE: New University of Georgia Rose Rosette Virus article

I honestly wonder if some of the people who write these articles have seen RRD and RU damage first hand.


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RE: New University of Georgia Rose Rosette Virus article

Since the comment: "I honestly wonder if some of the people who write these articles have seen RRD and RU damage first hand." was made, I attempted to find a "big gun".

Raymond A. Cloyd, Ph.D. Professor and Specialist in Ornamental Entomology/Integrated Pest Management, Department of Entomology, Kansas State University has a March 2011 web article about Rose Rosette Disease:
http://www.ksre.ksu.edu/library/entml2/mf2974.pdf

Of particular interest relative to comments in this thread is the following:

"Symptoms
Plants infected with rose rosette disease may display the
following symptoms:
� rapid stem elongation (Figure 1)
� leaf distortion
� leaf reddening (Figure 1)
� leaf chlorosis with yellow mosaic patterns
� abnormal narrow leaflets or smaller leaves than normal
� thickened stems
� premature lateral bud development
� excessive thorn production (Figure 2)"

Later he states: "In general, symptoms of rose rosette are less severe on garden roses."

Professor Cloyd is probably best known to rose growers as coauthor of the book "Compendium of rose diseases and pests" (2007) with Professor R.K. Horst

http://entomology.k-state.edu/people/faculty/Cloyd-Raymond-A.html

http://entomology.k-state.edu/doc/cv/maincurriculumvitae.doc

Here is a link that might be useful: link for March 2011 rose rosette article quoted above


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RE: New University of Georgia Rose Rosette Virus article

Henry,
Your big gun is a bug man.
That is all.

Although the "Later he states: "In general, symptoms of rose rosette are less severe on garden roses." " is one of the worst generalizations I've heard since the infamous
"So, Mrs. Lincoln, otherwise, how did you enjoy the play?"


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RE: New University of Georgia Rose Rosette Virus article

Regarding Professor Cloyd qualifications. In my Rose Rosette Virus link, I cite a very recent (August 1, 2012) Univ of Arkansas paper with Professor Hagen as one of the authors. (Professor Hagen is another plant scientist that I feel is familar to those roses growers interested in the scientific aspects of rose growing.) http://www.aces.edu/extcomm/timelyinfo/PlantPathology/2012/July/2012RoseRosetteTIFormatted.pdf

If one looks at the sources that the above University of Arkansas paper cites, you will see that they cite 3 papers. One of which is the same Kansas State paper (with Professor Cloyd as the only author) that I cited!

---------------------------------

The following "class" was held yesterday: "You are welcome to attend the Wichita Rose Society monthly meeting. Refreshments will be served at 6:30 PM and the program will start at 7:00 PM. Dr. Raymond Cloyd from Kansas State University will be talking about Rose Rosette and Aster Yellows Diseases."

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Regarding Professor Cloyd's statement: "In general, symptoms of rose rosette are less severe on garden roses."

I assume that he did not have the benefit of the publication that also appeared in 2011 from the Maryland Department of Agriculture; but please note his use of "in general". I should also point out that since Rose Rosette Virus is a virus, its destructive ability should be expected to differ depending on the immune system of the type of rose. This is probably the reason, that multiflora and near hybrids seem to be particularly susceptible.

The Maryland Department of Agriculture reported: "However over the following 15 years, as MDA has monitored the continuing eastward spread of RRD, it has become apparent that many of our cultivated rose varieties are susceptible to the disease as well. Many popular varieties have been noted exhibiting symptoms of the disease with apparent susceptibility ranging from very susceptible (plants die in one to two seasons) through resistant (plants exhibit symptoms but live for several years) to apparently immune. In field trials conducted by MDA, ‘Flower Carpet” varieties have proven to be very susceptible, Meidland cultivars, including ‘Alba’ are moderately susceptible and the native species of roses; Rosa setigera, R. virginiana, and R. palustris and the naturalized R. rugosa seem to be very resistant to possibly immune to the disease. There are reports from the landscape and nursery trade in Maryland that other rose cultivars and species affected include, in no particular order: ‘Knockout’ , ‘Tamora’, ‘Zephrine Drouhin’ , ‘Collette’, ‘Snowbush’, ‘Kew Rambler’, ‘New Dawn’, ’Daybreak’, ‘Carmenetta ‘, ‘Clymenestra’, ‘Alexander Girault’, ‘America’, ‘William R. Smith’, ‘Zitkala’, ‘American Pillar’, ‘Snow Dwarf’, ‘Edmund Proust’, ‘Easlea’s Golden Rambler’, ‘Mrs. F.W. Flight’, ‘Edith Ballenden’, ‘Walsh Rambler’, ‘Madam Alfred Carriere’, and Rosa wichuriana hybrids."
http://www.mdinvasivesp.org/archived_invaders/archived_invaders_2011_07.html

Here is a link that might be useful: link for class


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RE: New University of Georgia Rose Rosette Virus article

Since it was University Scientists who introduced this plague on to roses while failing to recognize the danger to cultivated roses, I don't see why their opinions now carry more weight than those of us who are dealing with it first hand.

There is a time to read articles and studies and a time to trust what is going on in your own yard.


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RE: New University of Georgia Rose Rosette Virus article

"Symptoms on cultivated roses are typically less severe than on multiflora rose."

"The earliest symptoms of rose rosette disease include a red pigmentation of the underside of leaf veins followed by sharply increased growth of vegetative shoots, which are typically more succulent than normal and colored in various shades of red. Leaves will become deformed, crinkled, and brittle with yellow mosaics and red pigmentation. As the disease progresses, leaves become very small, petioles are shortened, and most lateral buds grow, producing short, intensely red shoots."

" Cultivated roses show symptoms of thickened, succulent stems and a proliferation of thorns."

Here is a link that might be useful: missouri botanical garden no date or author


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RE: New University of Georgia Rose Rosette Virus article

Henry,

FYI.

A dead rose is a dead rose. That negates any discussion of severity of symptoms.

Dead is dead. How ugly a rose becomes on its path to dieing really doesn't matter.


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RE: New University of Georgia Rose Rosette Virus article

anntn6b, knowing how resistant (severity of symptoms) a given rose is may be useful in deciding whether to try to save it by cutting off the infected cane.

Until the specific rose rosette virus test is widely available and much more controlled testing is published, there probably will be a lot of "may bes".

Have you come across any information on the temperature dependence behavior of the infections?

The M.S. Thesis by Alma Glenn Laney, UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS, 2010, 110 pages is available for purchase. I have not yet decided to obtain a copy. Have you seen it? If so, do you recommend it?

Here is a link that might be useful: M.S. Thesis by Alma Glenn Laney, UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS, 2010,


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RE: New University of Georgia Rose Rosette Virus article

If I lived in RRD zone, it seems to me....

That if I knew where I lived, and I could look at the land surrounding me, and that land was left fairly to its own, and it was covered with wild roses, and no farmer did anything about them, and the roses had RRD And MY roses started showing symptoms of RRD

Then it is smarter to remove the infected rose than wait and see if maybe someone in the county used Round-Up and it blew over to my yard.

Of course it is horrible to have to cut out your RRD roses, and it might be better to get permission from the neighbors to go spray Round Up on their RRD wild roses....


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RE: New University of Georgia Rose Rosette Virus article

Kippy-the-Hippy, you did not mention asking the farmer if he/she had sprayed a herbicide on the multiflora.

Some people seem to be assuming that all "sick" multiflora are infected by RRV. I assume that some/many farmers spray multiflora.


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RE: New University of Georgia Rose Rosette Virus article

Henry

"and it was covered with wild roses, and no farmer did anything about them"

There ya go


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RE: New University of Georgia Rose Rosette Virus article

Kippy-the-Hippy, sorry I did not recognize that you set up your example to be so limited. I assumed that you meant that the farmer did not remove the "sick" plants.

You stated that the multiflora had RRD. I assumed that you meant that they were "sick". Then you observed "sick" roses in your garden.

From that point you state: "than wait and see if maybe someone in the county used Round-Up and it blew over to my yard."

H. Kuska comment: Not "wait and see". There is still a more efficient option that you could/should try. Ask the farmer and other neighbor farmers if they had used a herbicide (particularly if upwind from the affected multiflora and your roses). I.E. I am suggesting that asking should be part of the decision process.


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RE: New University of Georgia Rose Rosette Virus article

Henry,
I've talked with Alma and her major professor about her thesis. It's one of those written as chapters suitable for publication. Both told me that the two (of four total) that deal with RRD (then) are the two published in Weed Science with several co-authors. Can your library access Weed Science? If not, let me know.

Cutting off an infected cane HAS to be done before the virus moves down into the roots (assuming stem meristem infection) and back out. I've saved several roses from different classes in my yard by catching the problem when only a single leaf node (or three on one side of the cane) were infected in fall. I saved an American Pillar in spring when it was out on a cane about ten feet from the roots. I've never saved a HT, and I've only seen RRD on HTs in spring. That may have something to do with the transmission times in fall to late fall.

The one thing that (I don't think) has been addressed is what it is about RRD that ultimately kills the host rose. Epstein and Hill reported a lack of sugar to starch conversion in long infected canes. The odd thing that I watched this year was that some roses I've watched for four years finally got down to scrawney, skinny leaves often with PM and then they died in May (which was not a time of drought or too much rain- just really nice weather.) We know from Glen Viehmeyer and Percy Wright that both saw RRD overwinter in the colder parts of Canada.

I don't think we know much about temperature and the whole batch of EMARviruses.


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RE: New University of Georgia Rose Rosette Virus article

This 2012 review of which plant viruses are in the genus Emaravirus is available for free.

http://www.mdpi.com/1999-4915/4/9/1515/htm

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The 2006 Washington State M.S. Thesis, EPIDEMIOLOGY OF AND RESISTANCE TO WHEAT STREAK MOSAIC VIRUS IN PERENNIAL WHEAT, attempted to look for a temperature sensitive resistence but were not able to draw strong conclusions from their data.

http://www.dissertations.wsu.edu/Thesis/Fall2006/l_harrison_121806.pdf

Here is a link that might be useful: link to review


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RE: New University of Georgia Rose Rosette Virus article

The USDA put a lot of manpower and money into studying the Wheat Streak virus problem in the Great Plains. When I visited Dr. Stan Jensen he was straightforward with me as he knew about RRD and he said there will never be the money to study RRD that there has been for wheat streak and that the best that I could do would be to take information from wheat streak and related viruses and apply it to RRD.

The odd thing with the mite vectors of wheat streak (and they do vector it to corn) is that there is a very limited window when the mites leave the wheat and are carried to other crops (which include other stands of wheat). IIRC it has to do with the mites determining that the wheat is no longer the best place (imagin the if/then decisions that their miniscule minds must engage in) for them to live and their choice is to catch a puff of wind and move with a chance of finding a new host plant

Today there's a storm that started up over Missouri and Oklahoma and Arkansas with some strong winds. Any mites who have gone airborn could still be carried by it as it approaches the east ....and this isn't the fastest moving storm of the year. Remember that the mites stay airborne until the wind drops to near 0mph.


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RE: New University of Georgia Rose Rosette Virus article

It appears that for wheat there is not an enhanced high temperature immune system ability to fight the virus.

2012 Master's Thesis from the University of Nebraska, Transmission of Triticum mosaic virus and its Impact
on the Biology of the Wheat Curl Mite Aceria
tosichella Keifer (Eriophyidae), and an Evaluation of
Management Tactics for the Wheat Curl Mite and the Wheat-Mite-Virus Complex." by Anthony J. McMechan.

"Warmer temperatures also increase virus reproduction and titer in virus-infected plants causing an increase in damage potential. Wheat plants inoculated with WSMV and held at 28�C showed symptoms at 5 days whereas plants held at 15�C required 15 days for expression (Sill and Fellows 1953)."

"Both sources of resistance are temperature sensitive, becoming ineffective at temperatures above 24�C (Seifers et al. 2006). These lines are considered to be valuable sources of resistance in areas where temperatures are cool following planting in the fall (Seifers et al. 2006)."

"Mace is not effective against viruses transmitted by the
WCM at temperatures above 25�C (Graybosch et al. 2009)."

(Mace is a genetically modified wheat with an introduced virus resistant gene (Wsm1 gene)
http://maswheat.ucdavis.edu/protocols/WSMV/index.htm

Here is a link that might be useful: 2012 Master's Thesis


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RE: New University of Georgia Rose Rosette Virus article

I had not looked back at this tread.

But I find it interesting how I purposely made a very wide generalization. And it was interpreted as a specific one...interesting.

My point was and still is: If you live in an area with farms and farmers that can not afford or have no desire to deal with infected wild roses, it is unlikely the damage to your own roses was caused by nearby farmers spraying round up on their roses.

And further, if it was my prized roses I would remove all infected AND ask the neighboring farms if I could kill off their wild roses for them. To reduce, of course removing a few plants will not solve the bigger problem, the numbers of infected mites.


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