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Roses Unlimited

Posted by dmoore66 6 NorthWest NJ (My Page) on
Tue, Nov 5, 13 at 7:36

Good place to buy?


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Roses Unlimited

Oh, yes. Very good well-established plants. Huge selection.


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RE: Roses Unlimited

One of the very best, if you are looking for potted own-root roses. They are often blooming already when you open the box. So cool!

Kate


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RE: Roses Unlimited

Yes and yes....


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RE: Roses Unlimited

Not for you. A lot of what they sell will do much, much better in the northeast grafted onto a rootstock. *If* you know what you are doing, and can cherry pick roses that will do well in your location own-root, they are a fine source. Otherwise, you are much better off with the Canadians.


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RE: Roses Unlimited

Good point, gallica. My Zone 6 allows me to go either way, so own root or grafted is not a big deal with me. But if it matters in the poster's zone 6 and grafted would be a better choice, then go with Pickering or Palatine ("the Canadians")--they are first rate places also.

Kate


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RE: Roses Unlimited

How about Regan. They have what I am looking for


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RE: Roses Unlimited

Palatine and Pickering are first-rate for multiflora grafts and RU is an amazing source for own root.
Susan


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RE: Roses Unlimited

Reagan is a "middle man" who order from producers and they can be a one stop shopping location.

The problem for me used to be that their shipping prices doubled the cost of each rose even for the bareroot roses. Nowadays, shipping costs are much higher.

If money is no object, it is easy to buy from Reagan, and I wish I lived close enough to walk in and buy there.

But I don't.

For that reason I generally buy from producers as it's a single shipping charge from them to me.


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RE: Roses Unlimited

When it comes down to which good grafted roses place to order from, I usually just go practical and order from the closest one (if the shipping charges are less) or the overall cheapest.

Same goes with own-root potted roses places--if they are all good, go with the cheapest--which often means the one that is closest to you.

For some people looking at grafted roses, it makes a difference whether the roses are grafted on Dr. Huey or multiflora or fortunate or whatever--in which case, pick the closest, cheapest good place you can find. So far, I've had no reason to worry what the graft was--most are on Dr. Huey, which is fine with me. But the Canadian places (Pickering and Palatine) are on multiflora--which is also fine with me.

Usually my first choice for grafted is Pickering or Palatine. For own-root, Roses Unlimited or Chamblees.

Kate


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RE: Roses Unlimited

I have a fantastic local rose source which is my first choice for a rose purchase, so "go local", if possible, and support a nearby business. If buying local isn't possible for me, I usually go with the Canadians--Palatine, Pickering, and yes, Hortico. Another online source for both grafted (Huey) and own root which I've used is Edmund's. Diane


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RE: Roses Unlimited

Regan primarily sells grafted on Dr. Huey.

What are you looking for that the Canadians don't sell?


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RE: Roses Unlimited

Thanks all!


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RE: Roses Unlimited

I've had good experiences with Edmunds, seems their prices are a bit better than Regan.


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RE: Roses Unlimited

I've ordered from every company mentioned here, except Hortico. I like Edmunds for the prices and the free shipping for $100 or larger order, if you place your order early and I have never had a problem with the quality. I like Roses Unlimited, Palatine and Pickering too.


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RE: Roses Unlimited

I am also in zone 6 NJ, though I'm in central NJ, not northwest. I have been ordering from RU for years with great success. I have ordered all kinds of roses from them - Austins, shrubs, climbers, ogrs, you name it; all have thrived. I order from RU, Rogue, Heirloom, Northland, Pickering, DA, Hortico - I order from whoever of these vendors carry the roses that I want (if available from multiples, I choose the least expensive). I don't choose based on whether the particular variety is own root or grafted. I find both do well. Though with smaller-sized own-roots, I do grow them on for a while in pots. Honestly, the only supplier whose roses have not done so well for me is Vintage - I think this is not at all their fault, but rather that our climates are too different.

Anyway, this is just my experience - I'd suggest maybe placing a small order with RU next spring, and just see how they do. They are lovely to deal with and the plants really are nice!

I should add that I'm pretty sure I'm in zone 6b, not zone 6a, not sure which you are - perhaps that makes a difference? But I'm certainly in the Northeast like you, so hope this helps!

best,

Frances


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RE: Roses Unlimited

I ordered 7 roses from Regan.
They were the only one to have all seven that I wanted for the spring.
I asked for them to be delivered April 1st.
Is that the proper time for 6A?


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RE: Roses Unlimited

Hi,

I order from Regan too. I was under the impression,but not sure about their grafted roses being on Dr. Huey. I do not know if that makes a difference for you and your climate.

Lynn


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RE: Roses Unlimited

I have no idea.
Maybe someone can respond!


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RE: Roses Unlimited

Apr. 1 is probably a good date for bare-root roses to be planted in Zone 6. You might even get them a week or two earlier--certainly no later than the end of April.

As I understand it, the rootstock depends on where Regan got the rose. If from Canada, it is most likely multiflora rootstock. If from somewhere in the U.S., it is most likely Dr. Huey. How you determine where they came from, however, I don't know.

I can't say for sure which rootstock is best for your area. In my Zone 6 (Kansas), it really doesn't make much difference, so I never worry about it. That may or may not be true in your Zone 6.

Why don't you email Regan and ask what rootstocks are on your ordered roses and ask if one rootstock is better than another in your area? I've contacted them before, and they seemed friendly and responsive.

Kate


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RE: Roses Unlimited

I was about to say, ask them. I had answered earlier. All of the plants that I have ever received from Regan were grafted on Dr. Huey.


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RE: Roses Unlimited

That's bad??
I wrote to them.
If they tell me huey should I cancel the order.
The roses I ordered are bewitched, electron, barbra Streisand, memorial day, sugar moon and fokelore.
Could not find some in Canada


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RE: Roses Unlimited

  • Posted by seil z6b MI (My Page) on
    Wed, Nov 6, 13 at 16:08

No, you do not need to cancel your order. Dr. Huey has been the root stock of choice for most of the country for MANY years and has preformed just fine as such. In NJ it should grow and winter very well for you. There are some parts of the country where other types of root stocks are preferred now because of particular regional growing situations. But the good Doctor is still grown through out much of the country.

The only root stock I would caution you about for your zone is fortuniana which is very cold tender. It will probably not winter for you. Although, I've heard recently that if you can get it to survive it's first winter it will do OK from then on. I've never tried it so I can't say.


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RE: Roses Unlimited

In my opinion, Barbra Streisand is a "west coast" rose, no matter what rootstock. I have never seen a good one in the northeast. Neptune is a better lavender HT. Palatine has Folklore and Sugar Moon.

I do have a lot of plants on Dr. Huey, because I didn't know anything else. Most are OK, but the ones on R. multiflora are performing much better.


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Let me join the others in saying Dr. Huey is OK rootstock--as is multiflora. I hope I didn't say anything above that misled you on that score. Either one works fine in my garden soil and probably will be ok in most gardens throughout the country--unless you live in Florida. They seem to have some unique problems they have to contend with--but that doesn't mean the standard rootstocks will not work fine in our gardens in all the other states.

Unless you can come up with a really good reason why you should NOT use either one, quit worrying about it--just plant whichever one you get.

Good luck. : )

Kate


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RE: Roses Unlimited

I cancelled Regan order and ordered three from Palatine and three from Pickering;
Sugar Moon, Neptune, Dolly Parton, Electron, Berolina and Over The Moon.


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RE: Roses Unlimited

In my limited experience Zone 7, the Huey grafts have tons of dieback while the multiflora have none. Not sure why? Anyone?
Dmoore66 you will be happy with your orders. Super healthy big beautiful bareroots will arrive.
Susan


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RE: Roses Unlimited

I don't find any difference between multiflora and Dr Huey rootstock as far as dieback is concerned in my garden, but I have very little dieback, anyway. Susan, do you live in the West or East? Maybe that could make a difference in how the rootstocks respond to cold. And is your soil acid or alkaline? Just curious, because that could be another factor in dieback. Diane


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RE: Roses Unlimited

The only thing I have heard/read is that Dr. Huey is the "go to for warmer climates", which relatively speaking could represent much of the U.S. Also I have read that DR. Huey is a better performer in alkaline soils as compared to Multiflora which was communicated to be better for areas that have more acidic soil.
Hopefully someone can confirm, clarify etc.

Lynn


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RE: Roses Unlimited

I have a question about the Austins. In the Northeast, if I bought one from David Austin, would it be own root or grafted? And I assume from Palatine or Pickering, it would be grafted onto rootstock, correct? So should I think about ordering Austins from Roses Unlimited? They would be own root, and how would that grow in my zone 6a Northeast Garden?

And I wonder if grafting a rose onto rootstock changes anything about the way it grows aside from hardiness? Does it change it's ability to fend off disease at all, for instance? Or can it change the appearance of the rose?


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RE: Roses Unlimited

Rootstock affects basically two things - vigor, and the rose's ability to interact with the soil. Unless there is some mismatch between one rootstock and the soil which is fixed by changing rootstock, it doesn't affect health or cane hardiness. A rootstock can turn a wimpy, non-growing rose into an acceptable specimen.

IME, very few roses that dieback make at all satisfactory plants own-root. They *need*, desperately, the extra vigor a good rootstock gives. Austins are very firmly in that category.


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RE: Roses Unlimited

Thanks for that explanation. Does it matter that I am a zone warmer than you are? Would there be more roses that would not experience dieback for me. I ask because I have noticed that there is less die back on Julia Child for me than my other roses and that is the one that does the best.

I notice you are in Eastern NY, zone 5, is that along the coast and not in upstate NY which would be western NY, right? I am in a pocket of z6 in my area, where even 30 minutes to the West of me, it is zone 5.

I wonder where you purchase your roses? Have you at some point tried purchasing Austins or made an order from Roses Unlimited for own root roses?


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RE: Roses Unlimited

Austins vary in how fast they grow own root. Some get big very quickly own root and some might take longer to gain momentum. At least in my zone 7 garden. For me they do best potted up from one gallon to 3 gallon pots. Once they're a good size in a pot they seem to take off better in the ground. I bought The Generous Gardener own root from RU this spring. I potted it up and now it has two long canes about 5' long each. I just planted it in the ground and think it'll probably take off next spring. I doubt a grafted one would have done any better.


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RE: Roses Unlimited

My understanding is that own roots take a bit longer to get going but after a couple years, they usually catch up with their grafted peers. As a result, I don't usually worry much about whether my roses are own root or grafted. They both do fine in my garden.

For the record, roses from Austin are usually grafted on Dr. Huey. If they are own-root, Austin will announce that in the heading for the rose.

Kate


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RE: Roses Unlimited

I'm in the Hudson Valley. If you extend the Mass-Conn state line west to the Hudson River, that is very close to where I live.

Yes, the warmer you are, the more roses don't die back. However, you don't pick up a lot of roses until winter lows are typically around zero.

When we first started seriously growing roses, we rooted a lot ourselves. It's a cheap way of going through a lot of roses. One of the local house museums bought a lot of roses from RU. And lost all of them in two years.


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RE: Roses Unlimited

So, I'd have to be zone 6b or 7a before there would be more of a selection available. Well, with all the crazy climate changes we're all going through, who knows, we all might end up in a different zone at some point.

You rooted your own roses, from friends roses? That's a great way to do it.

That is awful that museum lost all of the roses from RU. A very expensive experience. Time and money. Very good to know.


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RE: Roses Unlimited

But it is hard to know why those roses at the museum failed. I doubt it was because they were own-root. I hope some other people in cold climates report their results with own-root plants. It could be that they planted them late in the season and they may have not been established enough to face the winter. I know of a person in upstate NY who pushes her zone and even grows some own-root teas. I know some gardeners in the north prefer own-root plants.


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Fun Stuff

Ain't it true?

One example makes a rule.

Many examples define an exception.

It is very good to make assumptions.

Always assume that the results of an experienced gardener and those of someone who "plants roses" will not vary.

Assume that this is also true of businesses that plant roses.

I think these are good assumptions.

It is very good to make assumptions.

Ain't it true?


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RE: Roses Unlimited

Oh, I forgot a couple of things:

RU has a customer service rating of 96%. I think this means that almost all their customers think they are horrible.

RU is or has been on the watchdog top 5 list. I think this means that we should be warned in advance about how bad they are.

Ain't it true?


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RE: Roses Unlimited

Sandandsun, love it!


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RE: Roses Unlimited

I live in upstate NY in the Mohawk valley, zone 5a (allegedly, but it seems to be getting warmer).

Roses which have thrived ownroot for me: albas, Kordesii climbers, rugosa hybrids, which grow huge, and the New Dawn progeny climbers.

HTs I have decided are best considered as annuals. At $4-$10 ea. from the big boxes in spring, they are more satisfying than the generic annuals the nurseries sell. Annuals grow very well here from seed because the soil never dries out.

Last spring I bought Oregold, Fragrant Cloud, Tropicana, all body bags from Aldis, which had some nice looking plants. I loved the blooms, I planted deep and am even now applying protective covering. If they survive the winter, that will be wonderful; if not, I consider I still got my money's worth.

Hybrid Perpetuals also do very well ownroot in my yard. They get some BS towards the end of the season, but not a lot, and I get more bloom than I expected. Portland roses ownroot will survive the winter but need a lot of babying. I have found that the multiflora rootstock which the Canadians use needs to be planted deep or it suckers and takes over your plant.

Among ramblers, setigiras and Ayrshires are hardy, grow vigorously and no rootstock is needed or wanted for them. Anyone who wants a humongous rambler in a zone 5 area might want to try Wedding Day, which I got by accident. It is huge and thorny, coldzones answer to Mermaid for keeping two legged varmints out of your yard.

Wedding Day has flexible canes which grow to enormous lengths. One plant could be trained along a fence to protect a vegetable patch: a few years back there was a heartbreaking post on another forum from a gardener in New England whose entire harvest had been stolen while she was at work. It is sad than anyone should have to go to such lengths as planting monster thorny ramblers and stetting up fake cameras, but there it is.

Floribundas and shrubs are a mixed bag. Titian and St. Elizabeth of Hungary are quite hardy and grow to about 3-4' high in 1 or 2 seasons. I am finding that the Tantau floribundas I like so much can be grown here, on rootstock, but they don't get very large. The best performer for me has been Puzzta.

I have also concluded that, despite the obvious fertility of the heavy soils, a good feeding program is needed to encourage roses to put on enough growth during the summer so that they can better survive winter.


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RE: Roses Unlimited

I may be WAAAAAY off the mark here in my limited knowledge and I agree with what Sandandsun had to say about personal experiences etc. Always, particularly with living plants, YMMV. Take what you like and leave the rest.
BUT, with that disclaimer out there, wouldn't it make sense that roses bred by Eastern and Northern European breeders would, by default, be hardier than those bred in France or England (particularly the older roses which were bred before international commerce became what it is now)?
I know my Geschwind's are troopers. I would think the older Tantau's etc. would be super hardy.
Perhaps an HMF search by breeder if you want own roots that are successful in cold zones. If a rose can grow in Moscow I should think it would be just fine in NJ...I really enjoy looking at the Polish, Russian and Balkan gardens on HMF. Who knows what they may spray or feed their roses but they are some of the most beautiful I have ever seen and they must be super-hardy. Also, there is a gentleman from Sweden with a gorgeous garden and he likes to push the Zone envelope.
Susan, who is simply offering an opinion...


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RE: Roses Unlimited

When a hybridizer breds a rose for a cold climate he makes sure that the rose needs a long dormant period to retain hardiness and produce good blooms. The Canadian series of roses do really well in the prairies but get BS badly where the winter isn't very cold like the PNW. If a French breeder bred a rose to do well in France, he would have to consider that the south is warm but the north is cold. But he has to make money so he breeds to the areas which will buy lots of roses. Most roses will do well in areas where a gardener doesn't have to go to extremes to get them through a winter. The number of roses in the background of a rose would fill pages. The secret to growing roses well is to make sure you get a clean, healthy rose to start with.


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RE: Roses Unlimited

Just wanted to chime in with a follow-up for Sandandsun's report on Roses Unlimited from Dave's garden watchdog. I think you may be reading the 96% backward. When I checked Garden Watchdog today, RU had 90 positive comments, and only 2 neutral and 2 negative. Given the glowing remarks here (including me), I think Gardenwebbers agree it's a good company if you want own-root plants. If you're looking for grafted plants, obviously you'd head elsewhere.

I've never had anything but good service from Pat, and she's well above my personal average for not only never sending the wrong rose, but also for almost never being out of a rose after I've ordered it because of crop failure. For me, I love the own root plants because I don't have to worry about it dying down to the graft. Yes, I bury my grafts deeply (so if the graft survives, the rose survives), but if I can get any roots to survive the winter on an own-root plant I find my winter survival rates are at least as good on own-root as grafted plants. This applies to my dry zone 5 up-and-down temperature Nebraska yard, and it sounds like those odds may be different in the northeast.

Cynthia


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RE: Roses Unlimited

Cynthia, I agree with you. The testimonies here and on Dave's site clearly show that Roses Unlimited is one of the very best places to go to get own root roses. I don't understand why sand-and-sun thinks they are rated so horribly. That simply is not true. They are one of the very best!

And yes, they are very customer -friendly and helpful if you have any questions or problems.

I think we should be careful before we start spreading bad rumors about any rose seller, especially one with a proven EXCELLENT track record.

Kate


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RE: Roses Unlimited

Nippstress & dublinbay,

Thank you both for explaining to those who don't understand whether something is true or not that:

"Ain't it true" means "It ain't true" in both my posts above.

Glad you did if it was really required, because I wouldn't want anyone to think that I think badly of RU. In the link below, we see that I've recommended them before.

Maybe susan4952 was the only one to pick up on the humor.

Here is a link that might be useful: Best roses for My Area


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RE: Roses Unlimited

Further clarification:

There were two truths in the "It Ain't True" fun.

It is true that Roses Unlimited has a 96% customer satisfaction rating.

(And really, does anyone not understand what that means?) Although I don't participate in such surveys, I completely agree. So my vote would help take the percentage HIGHER.

It is also true that Roses Unlimited is regularly listed on the Watchdog Top 5 list for roses.

This means they are in the Top 5 most highly regarded sources in their specialty. I also agree that this recognition is well deserved.


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RE: Roses Unlimited

Thanks for clarifying, Sandandsun. You're right that I didn't catch the humor the first time around, though I can see it now that you point it out. Sometimes the printed word doesn't carry those nuances of meaning as easily (we need an emoticon for "eye roll" or "wink wink" I guess). Anyway, I figured you had good things to say about RU and I'm glad at least Susan caught the humor on the first bounce.

I like your confirmation of the two truths, since they are such a good company. In case newbies log into this, they will hear a clear vote of approval from this thread. It never hurts to err on the cautious side out here on the web.

Cynthia


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