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armillaria root rot report - North Carolinia

Posted by henry_kuska z5 OH (kuska@neo.rr.com) on
Sun, Nov 24, 13 at 10:29

"At a recent plant disease training session provided by an Extension specialist at NC State, I was surprised to learn that roses are the most commonly submitted samples testing positive for armillaria root rot at the NCSU Plant Disease and Insect Clinic (PDIC). I knew that armillaria infects a wide variety of trees and shrubs, but I had encountered it most frequently as a problem on landscape shade trees."

http://www.newbernsj.com/news/local-columns/tom-glasgow-4-h-members-gear-up-to-show-their-mettle-1.238796

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Here is a link that might be useful: link to first page of two page report


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: armillaria root rot report - North Carolinia

Link is to something else.


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RE: armillaria root rot report - North Carolinia

Michael, the article is located near the bottom of the web page--not much more than is shown above, however.

Kate


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RE: armillaria root rot report - North Carolinia

Page 2

"Armillaria is fairly easy to diagnose on a tree or shrub when the bark can be separated from the trunk and inspected for the flattened, whitish mycelial growth. This might be a bit more difficult to accomplish given the slender stems and thin bark of roses, but certainly not impossible. Oftentimes the best approach is to submit a complete sample to the PDIC through your local Extension office. If in fact a tree or shrub in your landscape is infected with armillaria, the best course of action will be to remove as much of the trunk and roots as possible, and for a couple of years replant the site with annuals, perennials, grasses or other non-woody plants.

The viral disease rose rosette was also a topic of conversation at the training session. This is considered to be an emerging and fairly serious disease, with variable symptoms that can be tough to diagnose in the field. An excessive number of thorns along the stems should make you suspicious of rose rosette, but as with armillaria a sample to the PDIC might be the best way to confirm.

Tom Glasgow is the Craven County Extension director. Contact him "


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