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Anyone tried these animal repellant ideas?

Posted by Strawberryhill IL 5a (My Page) on
Thu, Jan 19, 12 at 12:16

After ordering 22 roses, I have visions of bunnies devouring them. Being pro-active, I searched for strategies in advance and found: Irish Spring Soap, rotten eggs spray, and below are a few more exotic ideas from Garden Experiments Forum. Anyone tried these ideas against rabbits and gophers?

Posted by Nandina 8b (My Page) I have been watching with great interest the extreme efforts a friend has made to repel deer. Nothing worked. She tried them all. Her problem is so severe that the deer climb ten steps onto the porch and attack her hanging baskets.

This spring she was in K-Mart and spotted an inexpensive form of the blue Tidy Bowl gizmo that you hang in the toilet tank at about $.50 apiece. Desperate to solve her deer problem she bought a few and hung them in places she wished to protect. Deer damage stopped.

Posted by Hunter (rem223@parkercounty.net) I know a gardener who sits a cheap TV out by the garden and leaves it on at night. Apparently, the voices keep the deer at bay.

Posted by billybob (billybob@hotmail.com) Deer will get accustomed to a radio that plays all night. I have tried the following with success: Set up a motion detector but instead of using a light bulb, plug in a radio. Put the motion detector in test mode. A deer approaches and the radio comes on for 5 seconds. The deer stops. The deer moves and the radio comes on again for 5 seconds. It really spooks them.

Posted by sydk z5 MA (My Page) Has anyone tried Styrofoam coyotes? They work well keeping the geese away.


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Anyone tried these animal repellant ideas?

  • Posted by hoovb z9 Southern CA (My Page) on
    Thu, Jan 19, 12 at 13:40

For bunnies I use a cylinder of wire fencing around the base of the rose. As the rose grows, the cylinder is hardly visible. Nearby perennials such as day lilys also hide the cylinder.

Cheap, effective, and...they work.


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RE: Anyone tried these animal repellant ideas?

My experience is artificial animals work until the vermin learn they don't move, can't chase them and are of no threat. My rabbits used to eat the roses right up to the base of the plastic owl.

The motion sensor sprinkler works quite well. It can help prevent the problems, as long as it's sensitive enough to pick the little darlings up as they enter the area. It can also get you real easily, too. http://www.deer-departed.com/motion-detector-deer-repellent.html Attach the hose and leave it on just a trickle. It will build pressure with time so it can provide the 3 second burst of water when activated, but won't result in outrageous water bills or flooding if the hose bursts.

Rabbits and deer, in particular, respond best to smells. Their major defense mechanism is their sense of smell. Spray on repellants work because they stink, jamming the animal's sense of smell so they avoid the plant. Hot pepper sprays are said to burn their mouths, but my "south of the border" rabbits LOVED anything I sprayed with the pepper spray.

What has worked best, everywhere I've tried it there has been enough room, has been planting stinky and fuzzy plants. If you can stink up the area enough, rabbits and deer will stay away from it because they can't smell if there is a coyote (or YOU) there due to the stench of the plants. Planting fuzzy things (which are usually also stinky) helps because both animals avoid eating fuzzy things. They require water to wash them down as they get gummy when chewed.

Is there enough room to plant smelly lavenders, rosemary, salvias, santolina, etc.? Are the sufficiently hardy enough for your climate? Stink up the place with smelly plants, particularly if there are entry points where they come into the garden, and you can help prevent a lot of it.

Spray ons have to be reapplied with time and to new growth and you can often smell them, too. They are also rather expensive. Dried urine is expensive and has to be reapplied fairly frequently to remain effective. Combining coyote urine with blood meal not only makes it smell as if the coyote has taken up residence, but he's also eating things there and that appears to help prevent them from entering the area. But, you can smell THEM, too. Plus, blood meal attracts coyotes, rats, racoons, etc. Just what you need...

There are tablets to put in the soil which release a foul tasting chemical into the plant. (see link below) These DO work. DO NOT handle them with your bare hands, period! You can absorb the chemical into your body and the taste will make you wish you hadn't! Don't eat anything which may have absorbed the chemical from the soil. You'll be very sorry! If deer and rabbits are killing your plants, these can save them for up to a year.

Hanging soaps and other stinky household items around the garden may work, but I wouldn't want them dissolving in rain or irrigation water and soaking into the soil. Treated "darts" with chemicals and urines can work, but are, again, expensive and have to be reapplied frequently. Kim

Here is a link that might be useful: Repellex Plant Tabs


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RE: Anyone tried these animal repellant ideas?

Thank you, Hoovb and Kim for your experiences. Years ago I fenced the entire rose garden, but the baby bunnies dug down at the bottom of the fence and slipped right in. My neighbor has a wooden fence, but bunnies still crawled under. He gave up and put large plastic buckets (top cut off) around his veges in the spring.

I'll make sure that the chicken wire is dug down deep enough. My other neighbor, a Ph.D. in botany, planted stinky garlic chives around his gardens. He collected those tiny flags that Comcast and Nicor gas put in the ground. He surrounded his veges with these flags. Since it's windy here, the flags are in constant motion, and the bunnies left his veges alone. They ate mine instead.

My Mom thinks that garlic doesn't work, since bunnies ate her garlic plants. Years ago I dusted petunias with garlic powder and bunnies liked it even more. I put powder cayenne pepper on my flowers and that didn't work either.

This year we had so much rain in the spring that the bunnies left my flowers alone. I also left ground almond out in the garden (from making almond milk) - it's either the bunnies ate the ground almond instead, or wild cats came for that stuff and scared bunnies away.

Question 1: I have some cheap perfume (Stetson). Would sprinkling cheap perfume around rose bushes scare bunnies away? - cheap perfume is stinkier than garlic chives.

Question 2: I have some plastic edging (6" to 7") tall that I can stand up around the rose garden. Can bunnies jump over a 5" tall plastic fence?

Thank you for your help.


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RE: Anyone tried these animal repellant ideas?

I wrap newly planted roses in a small amount of mesh netting, hold in place with a garden stake. Squirrels and rabbits seem to have no interest in trying to nibble when it's there.


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RE: Anyone tried these animal repellant ideas?

Thank you, Krista, that's a great idea. When I put William Shakepeare in a tall pot, the chipmunks climbed into the pot. They buried morsels into Mr. Shakespeare's root. MiracleGro potting soil is fluffy and easy to dig.

Mesh netting would keep all animals away. Krista, where do you get the mesh netting, and how does it look like? Thank you.


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RE: Anyone tried these animal repellant ideas?

Yes, they can jump over a five inch barrier. Not only that, but there is a product called Rabbit Guard with smaller sections toward the bottom, progressively increasing in size as it reaches the top. I hit our local recycling center and paid them to cut metal pipes into 4.5' lengths, then drove them into the ground to use as fence posts. I wired several hundreds of dollars of Rabbit Guard around the beds in the old Newhall garden as it was on the edge of the chaparral. Frustrated, I watched medium to large rabbits, both cotton tail and jack, hop up to the fence, stand on their rear haunches, place their front paws on the bottom rung of the first square they could fit through, then pull themselves through the danged fencing! That DID make getting them once inside easier because they didn't have the space needed to get a running start to jump back over it and were too frightened to pull their pull-through stunt to get back out. I was able to corner and "dispatch" many that way.

If the bloody rabbit wants in, it will get in. The best you can hope for is to make it difficult and unsavory as possible so they have to REALLY want in. The lazy ones will pass on by.

Squirrels plant stuff in the pots, too. Neighbors had bird feeders, even though they were strongly urged not to due to the desert rats. The squirrels brought mouths full of seed from them, planted them in my canned roses and I'd find thick shocks of seed germinating all over the pot ghetto. The feeders were all the way at the top of the facing hills, but they brought the seed down to the pots and planted them.

On this hill, the ground is not level enough, too soft and unsteady so I can't fence it in. I'm propagating very stinky salvia, which they not only won't eat (nor will gophers) but will avoid due to the intense scents of the plants. They're more arid loving and flower much of the summer so at least the rabbit "protection" will add color and be climatically and environmentally suitable. Kim

Here is a link that might be useful: Rabbit Guard


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RE: Anyone tried these animal repellant ideas?

Strawberryhill, I bought it many years ago and re-use the small pieces I cut from the roll. I think I got it from Home Depot or Lowes.
It's a black mesh netting.

I think it was marketed as bird netting, and I have never used it to trap birds or any other animal.

Care and caution must be used with it, as it could potentially get caught up in lawn mowers, if a piece of it should go astray.


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RE: Anyone tried these animal repellant ideas?

That type of "bird netting" is usually used to cover fruit trees to prevent bird damage to the crop. Kim


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RE: Anyone tried these animal repellent ideas?

What Kim wrote about the bunnies climbing up the fence was hilarious. The part about the squirrels playing tricks on Kim was even funnier.

The yellow yarrow flower smells like rotten corpse if I stick my nose to it. Thank you, Kim and Krista for info. on bird netting. I'll also try the cheap perfume experiment to see if the animals can handle that.


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RE: Anyone tried these animal repellant ideas?

The only thing that keeps deer out of my garden is the product 'Liquid Fence' sprayed at regular intervals (every 2 to 3 weeks) That has worked liked a charm for me for the 5 or 6 yrs I've used it.

The label claims that Liquid Fence repels rabbits as well. I might be able to keep the rabbits at bay if I were willing to spray the stuff 2 or 3 times a week, which I'm not about to do. Rabbits I can live with (albeit grudgingly). Deer, however, are a different story altogether.


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RE: Anyone tried these animal repellant ideas?

I don't have deer so the problem is rodents. They tend to leave the adult roses alone (except for Lavender Dream which they pretty well defoliated, but it's come back better than ever). I plant bands in the ground a few days after I get them and these little plants are at risk. When I prune my roses I save the lower, very thorny parts and make a circle about the rose bands, what you might call a "crown of thorns". I have some large rosemary bushes and often I cut off some branches and add them to the thorn barrier. I also have very large bushes of marjoram (because the bees adore them) and when I trim them back in the winter I also use the branches around the smaller roses. I've had great success with this although it is rather unsightly until the roses grow taller, but it's still a lot better than losing precious roses.

Ingrid


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RE: Anyone tried these animal repellant ideas?

  • Posted by seil z6 MI (My Page) on
    Fri, Jan 20, 12 at 21:09

I've used bird netting on my strawberry patch with pretty good results for a while. But the problem was birds. The rabbits chewed through it eventually. I planted onions thickly as a border all along my veggie garden last summer and that did keep the rabbits out. I even had lettuce planted and that didn't get eaten! Plus you get onions at the end of the season! They're small because I don't thin them because I want to keep the rabbits out but they're still tasty. I intend to do this again this season.

I have used the liquid fence type repellents (there are several) and it does work but you have to keep spraying it all the time. If it rains hard or your plants grow fast and you don't get out there the critters can move in fast and do damage. I lose the tops of my spring bulbs all the time because I don't see them come up quick enough to get out and spray them before they get eaten.

I put a 2 foot tall fence around the new bed last fall and lined it with chicken wire. I was out Monday walking the roses and it hasn't seemed to deter the rabbits. I saw fresh chomped canes in several places so I'm assuming they're just jumping the fence to get in. I'm thinking 6 foot high electrified barbed wire next....at least that would keep out whoever is cutting blooms on my roses too. Or maybe Kim's grenades!


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RE: Anyone tried these animal repellant ideas?

Your marjoram and rosemary are perfect "stinky" things to use to repel the rabbits, Ingrid. I grow sweet marjoram because I love it with tomatoes. You know, Seil, what would be really neat would be the motion sensor connected to a grenade launcher! Like an automatic skeet shooter! Kim


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RE: Anyone tried these animal repellant ideas?

That was funny, Seil - you have been elected to the comedians gang along with Kim and Campanula. You are right about a dense thicket of onions around the garden. That's what my Ph.D. in botany neighbor did to his garden -I could never figure out why he planted that many onions until now.

Thank you, jaxondel, for the info. on "Liquid Fence" - would cheap hair spray do the job? I'm just curious. It's not as exotic as a Styrofoam coyote, but less complicated than the moist potpourri recipe "an animal fixture of The very finest, though, are of animal origin -- ambergris (whale puke), civet musk (a substance disgorged from the aft end of a male civet cat to mark his territory), and glandular musks from a few other animals." You got me laughing so hard at my own naive assumption that potpourri is simple stuff.

Thank you, Ingrid, for an ingenious way of not wasting anything in the garden. What else I can tie around the lower trunk of a rose bush? Any suggestion? Thank you.


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RE: Anyone tried these animal repellant ideas?

Anything really SMELLY, hopefully, that retains its scent for as long a time as possible, will work. What really smelly foliaged plants are hardy in your area? Perhaps evergreen boughs, if tied densely enough? Kim


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RE: Anyone tried these animal repellant ideas?

I've kept the roving bands of foraging deer out of my northern slope by interplanting 'May Night' salvia among the roses. Now if I could only figure out something that would keep them out of the shade gardens and my hostas I'd be happy....


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RE: Anyone tried these animal repellant ideas?

  • Posted by seil z6 MI (My Page) on
    Sat, Jan 21, 12 at 1:34

That's it, Kim! A grenade launcher! There must be a surplus one around somewhere....maybe Ebay?


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RE: Anyone tried these animal repellant ideas?

Our neighborhood has a deer population that roam our gardens almost nightly, nibbling (sometimes devouring) roses and other goodies. Fences are not permitted in our front yards so I started appling my own homemade version of deer repellent. It has been effective for several years and is almost free in that I only add a raw scrambled egg to a gallon of water along with some garlic powder and chili sauce. When I first started using this, I sprayed the roses, but that took too long. Now all I do is "sprinkle" all the roses with this concoction about once a week. It's easy since I don't measure anything.
Molly


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RE: Anyone tried these animal repellant ideas?

Hi Terryjean: May night salvia is my favorite, very pretty purple color. I like jardineratx's safe recipe of raw eggs, garlic, and chili powder - I'll try that on the bunnies. It's safe and fertilizes roses too. A thicket of onions is too tall, I won't be able to see my tiny own-root roses until a few years later.

Yellow onions are indestructible. My hubby planted a few, they look so tall and awkward that I kept pulling them up. A tiny root left behind is enough to re-generate itself into a plant. I threw onion plants on top of my compost pile, and they bent over to root themselves. If there's a nuclear blast, the only thing left would be onions to nourish mankind. Has anyone fenced the entire garden with onions?

The wasp spray is extremely dangerous. It's only $2 and people use it carelessly. I was looking at NDE You-Tube and one guy used wasp spray, then ate a sandwich without washing his hands. He ended up comatose, went to heaven briefly, then paralyzed for 6 months in the hospital. He had to learn how to walk again. I definitely try the raw eggs on rose bush to deter rabbits. Thanks Molly for the sprinkling idea, it's easier than spraying.



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RE: Anyone tried these animal repellant ideas?

Like seil, I tried and then dismissed several "liquid fence type repellents" -- commercial ones, plus every recipe for homemade concoctions that came my way. Fortunately, I eventually found and tried Liquid Fence, which, BTW, you do not "have to keep spraying all the time". Once it dries on plants it does NOT wash away with the first rain, regardless of how heavy the rain is. The odor of the stuff is pretty horrendous, but that doesn't linger long after the spray dries.

Deer are creatures of habit and develop a regular, wide-ranging grazing 'circuit' which they tend not to deviate from as long as the 'circuit' provides adequate sustenance. When first using Liquid Fence, it's important to spray frequently (about once a week) to make the deer's habit of visiting your garden for a meal as unpleasant as possible. Thereafter, I've found that spraying roughly twice a month is adequate. Initially, I sprayed my entire garden, but now focus primarily on the perimeter.

IIRC, when I first purchased Liquid Fence the cost of a 40 oz. bottle of concentrate (makes 5 gallons of spray) was about $28. Now it's about $40. I cringe every time I buy it, but a little bit of spray goes a long way. I'm now mixing only a half gallon of solution each time I spray around the approx half acre of my property where most of my deer-vulnerable plantings are.

Sorry for going on and on -- just want to extend a ray of hope to any other gardener who's ever been stunned speechless at the sight of a once lovely garden that, overnight, has been literally decimated. In a neighborhood where fencing is prohibited and the deer population has increased, I've had no appreciable damage in years. May not work for every gardener, but it's worked for me.

Strawberryhill -- Don't know about the hairspray. That's one I've not tried. Please run a garden trial and report back. I'm always looking for a solution that's more economical than my current practice.


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RE: Anyone tried these animal repellant ideas?

  • Posted by hoovb z9 Southern CA (My Page) on
    Sat, Jan 21, 12 at 16:19

look at things from the animals point of view. If you were really, really hungry, would an odor hold you back?


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Anyone tried these animal repellent ideas?

Great thought, Hoovb, thank you. I checked on what rabbits eat. They have plenty to eat where there's is a lawn: they eat mostly grass and hay, including their own feces for a second tasting. They are not desperate, but roses are the ultimate gourmet food. When we spray roses and make it even grosser than feces, rabbits are forced to eat the mundane stuff which are plenty.

Here in the Midwest once the lawn starts to flower, around June, rabbits lose their interest in ornamental flowers, and eat flowering grass instead. Seil suggested birth control pills, I googled for that but couldn't find any. However, peppermint and spearmint has estrogenic activity which may work on rabbits. This mint family is famous for suppressing appetite and reducing facial hair (sounds good for menopausal women!)

Most birth control pills contains a combination of estrogen and progesterone to prevent ovulation. I would have to search for the type of plant that contains progesterone. There's an Indian village where vegetarian men eat lots of peas, and the birth rate is low. Maybe I should feed peas, soybeans, and mint to the bunnies to screw up their hormones.


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RE: Anyone tried these animal repellant ideas?

You're an animal Hoovb, how would you answer your question? How would you answer your question if you could move on a bit and find something to feed on with an odor less offensive, or having no odor at all? I've no idea what you're implying, but the fact of the matter is that Liquid Fence keeps deer out of my garden -- even in the dead of winter when most folks around here suffer the most damage. I thought we were seriously discussing strategies to prevent animals from destroying our gardens, that's all.


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RE: Anyone tried these animal repellant ideas?

But, it isn't that the odor "offends" the rabbits and deer. Their primary defense mechanisms are their sense of smell. If something smells so strongly, it prevents them from smelling anything else, they avoid it. That's how the liquid fence and other spray on repellants work.

The urine repellants work by making the animals think there is a predator close. Blood meal works (sometimes) because it makes it smell as though there is a fresh kill and they are entering the area the predator feeds in so they avoid it. Pepper sprays are supposed to repel them by burning their noses, mouths and eyes, but I've never found one which actually works, and that includes increasing the concentration to the point of burning foliage. I received one from a nurseryman friend the USDA was testing. I had to wear chemical resistant gloves, goggles and clothing and wear a respirator and use their special sticker-spreader. Didn't stop the rabbits one bit. The bitter tasting chemicals work by their bad taste. Most toxic substances have strongly bitter tastes and most vermin instinctively won't eat bitter tastes.

I had a customer at the beach whose back yard was constantly mowed down by the deer. He couldn't block it off because the fire department required access as he was in a fire zone. The deer entered his yard down the side of his house, the other three sides of the yard being blocked by cliff and trees. Once a dense, tall hedge of Rosemary was planted along the outside fence and along the foundation of the house, the deer refused to enter the yard. The only difference was the strong smell of the rosemary. It "jammed their radar" so they couldn't tell if there was a coyote or person waiting for them at the other end of the hedge.

I had many clients who critter proofed their gardens by planting rosemary, santolina, lavender, salvias and other herbs. As long as the plant is hardy enough for your climate and highly scented, it can help greatly. Kim


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RE: Anyone tried these animal repellent ideas?

Thank you, Kim, for explaining things to us - you help me a lot, much appreciated. I'm glad you suggest many pretty choices: rosemary, santolina, lavender, and salvias. I don't like the look of tall onions. The bunnies here hang out by the salvias. Rosemary is not hardy, but lavender is. The strongest smell goes to garlic chives, or Chinese chives. I planted garlic chives around my garden this year and no veges. were eaten. Chinese chives are proven to reduce spider mites and aphids. They are invasive if you don't cut down the flowers before they go to seed.

Years ago I threw blood meal around the fence to deter bunnies. The results? Marigolds became 3' tall with no flowers, and the bunnies still dug under the fence to get in. I was checking on progesterone, the other component in birth control pill. They discovered progesterone in plants last year: "Pauli and colleagues used two powerful laboratory techniques, nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectroscopy, to detect progesterone in leaves of the Common Walnut, or English Walnut, tree. They also identified five new progesterone-related steroids in a plant belonging to the buttercup family."

I had several walnut trees in my last house, with the worst proliferation of bunnies. Next question is: do animals eat for nutrients, or for water? We had a wet spring this year, and none of my flowers were eaten. We had a harsh winter last year, with my Knock-outs died back to the crown. They didn't sprout leaves until June 1, when the bunnies had plenty of other food like flowering grass and perennials.

Years ago I put rose cones on my Knock-outs. It was a bad idea, roses sprouted early in April, and when I removed the cones in May, they were chomped down by bunnies. This year I'll put a crystal bowl with water for the bunnies, and spray the 22 ordered roses with stinky hairspray and cheap perfume. I'll report the results.


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RE: Anyone tried these animal repellant ideas?

They eat for both nutrients and water. In the wild, many of our rabbits' only source of water is what they eat as we have virtually no springs, creeks or "rivers" here in the SoCal deserts. Birds use any condensation which collects but rabbits and other rodents have to rely upon the water stored in the foods they eat, much as reptiles do.

I don't know how wise it would be to spray the actual plants with hairspray. I don't know what, if any, damage it might do to them, but spraying materials hung from them to use as "air fresheners" would probably work. The spray on repellants use liquid latex, which can help fry foliage in our sun and heat, probably not in yours, to make them stick. Something absorbent and protected from direct water may work for you. Kim


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RE: Anyone tried these animal repellant ideas?

  • Posted by seil z6 MI (My Page) on
    Sun, Jan 22, 12 at 20:46

I bought some Irish Spring today and intend to give it a try. I'll let you all know if it keeps the rabbits out of the roses!


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RE: Anyone tried these animal repellent ideas?

I'm glad Hoovb raised the question which made me researched on rabbits. The Department of Agriculture is spending $90K to develop a birth-control pill for animals. I'm developing my own, thanks to Seil's giving me that idea.

My Mom & Dad grew a giant patch of peppermint the size of a master bedroom. They made tea out of fresh peppermint, which has estrogen. Neither of them need to shave. They both are skinny due to the appetite suppresant property of peppermint.

When I put water out for the animals, I'll soak some mint leaves for estrogen, plus walnut or buttercup leaves for progesterone - that would fix all annoying animals including chipmunks that climb into my pots.

Thanks, Kim, for warning me about hairspray. That idea came from the anti-dessicant spray of roses' canes before winterizing. I intended to sppray the lower canes with stinky hairspray, then cheap perfume on the leaves. About horse manure: Would fresh manure work better than compost manure in deterring rabbits? Fresh horse manure has chunks of poops and hair. We have lots of rain in the spring, so fresh manure would not burn, right? Thanks, Kim, for info. in advance.


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Answer to TerryJean: garlic chives grow in shade to deter deer

TerryJean posed a question as to what grows in shade to keep the deer out. Garlic or Chinese Chives grow well in shade, so do onions. These are stinkier than Salvia. Chinese chives is really yummy in pot stickers with ground pork, ginger, and soy sauce. My Chinese neighbor treated us with them and we all are addicted to garlic chives.

My Mom said that bunnies eat mint. They hang out in garlic plants, but don't eat garlic nor onions.



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RE: Anyone tried these animal repellant ideas?

Jaxondel, does Liquid Fence list the ingredients on the label? Perhaps that will give insight into what repels deer.
Thanks
Molly


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RE: Anyone tried these animal repellant ideas?

You're welcome Strawberryhill. From experience, there is nothing about horse or cow manure which will repel deer, rabbits, squirrels or rats. Predator urine (and Human urine, but don't ask HOW I know that, OK?) will repel them, at least temporarily, as will heavy applications of blood meal, though blood will attract every canine, feline, opossum, raccoon and other meat eater within miles.

The animals "know" what is a threat. A friend once collected the water from another friend's python tank. The snake would release his waste in the water, so Jack brought home a huge bucket of the waste water, which he sprinkled around his front yard and across the side walk. The neighbor's cat would saunter down the walk and use Jack's front yard as his litter box. When the cat hit the python waste, he stopped, sniffed a bit, bristled like a static electricity charge had hit him, turned and ran the other way. There was no evidence the cat had ever encountered a python, but the smell of the python waste repelled him.

The rabbits and squirrels ate my roses immediately after applications of FRESH horse manure in the old garden. They could tell the horse was no threat. They avoided the areas treated with wastes from animals which would joyfully do them harm. You just don't want to use manures from carnivores as there can be parasites and diseases you can contract from them.

The link below is from the product information page from Liquid Fence. You can download PDF files of their product labels to see full instructions, ingredients and warnings. Kim

Here is a link that might be useful: Product labels for Liquid Fence product down loads


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RE: Anyone tried these animal repellent ideas?

Thank you, Kim, for the above info. You save me from being gross out by fresh horse manure. I may not get horse manure this year if the corn meal dusting alone is effective against blackspots. I tested the pH of horse manure at least 5 times at various stages of decomposition: it's always above 8 pH with the lime added by the stable.

I checked the link you gave for Liquid Fence. The ingredients listed for deer and rabbits are: putrescent egg solids, garlic powder, and sodium lauryl sulfate (degreasing agent found in shampoo). I talked to my Mom and she said animals don't eat her mustard greens, garlic, onions, nor rhubarb leaves (poisonous). But they ate her cilantro, basil, and mint.

Curry powder is stinky and sold cheap at ethnic stores. I'll test that on my roses this spring. With 22 leafy new roses, I'll use the ones with the least harm to the soil. Thank you, Kim, for info. on Liquid Fence.


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RE: Anyone tried these animal repellant ideas?

You're welcome! You might even add some cheap cinnamon sticks. If you are plagued by ants in your pots, several inexpensive cinnamon sticks pushed into the soil can help encourage them to move on. Anything strongly scented, which carries well on the air, hopefully long lasting, should work for the vermin. If you have large rosemary plants, add your prunings from them, too. They can be terribly aromatic. My parents used to have a house with a full southern exposure here in Los Angeles. The entire hill was rosemary, concrete, brick and stucco. I could NOT be out front, even to come or go, when it was in the high nineties or higher. The stench of the rosemary was so strong, it triggered asthmatic responses, making it difficult for me to breathe. I still don't care for rosemary in food due to it. Add all you have, it works! Kim


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RE: Anyone tried these animal repellant ideas?

Sounds like it's time for bunny stew and venison stew. Yummy.


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RE: Anyone tried these animal repellant ideas?

Yup, grenade launchers (preferably motion sensor controlled) make the preparation much faster.. none of that messy chopping and dicing required! Kim


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RE: Anyone tried these animal repellant ideas?

My wife has been telling her friends that I am out training our neighborhood hawks how to kill wrabbits and not our birds. She paints vivid pictures of me waving my arms about shouting, and pointing at the wrabbits. If she bothered to come out the door she could tell that I was a cussing. Perhaps she already knows, just makes a better story.
I have been told that if a wrabbit can't see through the fence he will not jump over it. I haven't tried it myself, but----!

Here is a link that might be useful: Waddle fences


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RE: Anyone tried these animal repellant ideas?

That was funny, Iowa_jade, thanks. I checked the Waddle fences link: they look more fortified than the fences erected by Germans during Normandy invasion. Very impressive!

Whatever you do, NEVER feed bunnies rancid sunflower seeds. I threw those on our patio. A few days later, there's bunnies' feces everywhere. They diarrhea-ed on the patio. Bunnies clean up their poop by eating them, except for sunflower seeds. I have to put up with the ghastly potty site until they dry up enough to sweep away.

Seil will try Irish Spring Soap - I'll try one or two bars only, lest my backyard looks like a bubble bath in the wet spring. The old fashion baby-powder with talc is cheaper than perfume, so I'll sprinkle smelly baby-powder around roses.

I'll try more than one methods (raw eggs & garlic, curry powder, hair spray, garlic chives) and will report the results.


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RE: Anyone tried these animal repellant ideas?

Strawberryhill, I look forward to hearing of your success and/or failure with the raw eggs and garlic, etc. I'm just so glad that the egg "concoction" has worked for me.
Molly


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RE: Anyone tried these animal repellant ideas?

Woooot - it will soon be spring!!! The Deer has come into the garden looking for the roses:

Photobucket

And soon the action outside the wire cages will get going:

Photobucket

I tried not to feed the birds this winter so the birdseeds would not attract too many squirrels ..but the birds help keep the aphids at bay so I hung the feeder on a rope - hoping the Squirrels would fall down - Yeah right!:

Photobucket


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RE: Anyone tried these animal repellant ideas?

That was funny, cupshaped_roses! They got to be the funniest pictures ever - thanks for sharing with us. I got to share your pics. with my family - they'll get a good laugh.

Dogs do funny things too. My brother once threw firecrackers at a pitbull to scare it away. The pitbull wasn't scared, he tried to eat the firecrackers.


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RE: :Anyone tried these animal repellant ideas?

We all need a good laugh :) - and remember to smell the roses - when they bloom :-)

It can be hard to repel animals, that like to snack on our rosebushes :)


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RE: Anyone tried these animal repellant ideas?

Great photos Niels!


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RE;: Anyone tried these animal repellant ideas?

Thanks Doug :-) I hope you and your family are doing well. I often think of you and how great is it that we got the chance to meet in person - even though we live so far apart. So great to meet a kindred spirit who love roses :-)


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RE: Anyone tried these animal repellant ideas?

Thanks for the smiles,

Rosefolly


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RE: Anyone tried these animal repellant ideas?

I found another clever way to repel deer from the Soil Forum:

Posted by jolj 7b/8a-S.C.USA (My Page) on Sun, Mar 18, 12 at 12:52

I know a organic gardener who pee the length of his garden to keep deer at bay. This works fairly well.


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