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Charlotte vs Molineux?

Posted by nikthegreek 9b/10a E of Athens (My Page) on
Thu, Mar 6, 14 at 2:02

Thinking of planting a patch of yellows (maybe 5) dang in the middle of somewhere to catch the eye, come next season. Need the rose to be free flowering and heat tolerant. Charlotte, Molineux or maybe something else? No need to be an Austin but no gaudy type of orangey yellows. No PM magnets nor giant 6ft shrubs please. Med climate of course.
Nik

This post was edited by nikthegreek on Thu, Mar 6, 14 at 5:24


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Charlotte vs Molineux?

Molineux seems to be much more popular than Charlotte--perhaps due to its floriferousness?

I do not know much about Charlotte except that it is more consistently yellow. Molineux can pick up decided apricot tones on its golden-yellow blooms at times, other times it is golden-yellow but sometimes fades a lot so it appears more yellow-white--sometimes with a light-colored apricot-pink center. Other times, it stays more yellow. Molineux' s blooms are quite varied in color, in other words--one of the things I really like about Molineux.

I've never heard any rumors of Molineux growing into a monster. In my area, it stays about 3.5-4 ft tall at most.

Hope that helps.

Kate


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RE: Charlotte vs Molineux?

Julia Child and Nacogdoches [Grandma's Yellow] are excellent. Eureka is also a favorite and I have really liked Sparkle and Shine the year I have had it.


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RE: Charlotte vs Molineux?

I don't know Charlotte, but Molineux is actually on sale locally.
It is a good floriferous rose. The only reason why I don't have it is because it doesn't have enough perfume for me.
I am a sucker for roses that are abundant with their perfume.
Daisy


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RE: Charlotte vs Molineux?

Charlotte is charming and smaller than Molinuex. They are both nice roses. I also like Golden Celebration. I don't find it difficult to keep it at a reasonable size.


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RE: Charlotte vs Molineux?

GC I find it is a big rose, much larger than what would suit me in this case.
Nik


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RE: Charlotte vs Molineux?

NiK,
While everything grows big here, Molineux remained compact at 3-4'. Of all the roses lost to RRD, Molineux hurt the most.

 photo Spring05030_zpsf2e435e2.jpg

Photo supplied for the sole purpose of intense enablement in honor of a great enabler sporting the same name.


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RE: Charlotte vs Molineux?

  • Posted by zjw727 Coastal Oregon Zone (My Page) on
    Thu, Mar 6, 14 at 12:17

If it's available where you are, I can second the suggestion of Julia Child. It's exceptionally healthy, with very good repeat and a lovely scent.


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RE: Charlotte vs Molineux?

Molineux, as Daisy pointed out, is available locally at the nice price of Euro 9 plus P&P. Most other Austins, OGR's and shrub roses roses I have to import from somewhere in the EU (usually the UK since I love contributing to their balance of payments, them having provided my higher education cost free a long time ago) at grossly inflated prices.
Nik


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RE: Charlotte vs Molineux?

I was going to ask about Charlotte today as well. My grandmother -Charlotte- just passed last night and I have been long considering honoring her with one of these roses. It seems meant to be as not only does it share her name, but yellow was her favorite color rose.

Anyone growing Charlotte along the coast in SoCal? The issue with rememberence roses is if they struggle or fail, it can be even more disappointing/heart-wrenching. I'd hate to try Charlotte here just to watch it fail.

I'll start another post so as to not get too far off topic, but she was a life long Iowan so I'm also looking at Buck roses in case Charlotte would be questionable here. I'm all ears on Buck roses since Distant Drums is the only one in the garden here.

Jay


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RE: Charlotte vs Molineux?

Among those two yellows, I'd agree with the prevailing recommendation for Molineux. I have both, and Charlotte is distinctly smaller as well as less frequently blooming. I have to struggle to remember what it looks like in bloom, but not Molineux. Not that mine looks anything like as gorgeous and Harryshoe's picture most of the time, but that's not out of the range of possibility for this rose even in my zone.

Cynthia


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RE: Charlotte vs Molineux?

  • Posted by hoovb z9 Southern CA (My Page) on
    Thu, Mar 6, 14 at 15:08

Charlotte arches outwards like spider legs. Molineux is vertical in growth habit.

Some noses do not like the scent of Molineux. Mine does.

Molineux is always in bloom for me and has superb Rust resistance, so it is just about my favorite yellow. Julia Child is also rather vertical in habit, but shorter than Molineux. The fragrance is more appealing, but disease resistance isn't quite as good as Molineux, though it is quite good.


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RE: Charlotte vs Molineux?

Just found another Molineux photo. It illustrates the variance in bloom form and color when compared to the photograph above. I am determined to get another Molineux plant!

Molineux - Austin English Rose photo Mol_zps49326982.jpg


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RE: Charlotte vs Molineux?

Harryshoe, you said that you lost roses to RRD. Can you tell me when and how many roses did you lose to RRD. I noticed that you are in eastern PA, are you in the Lehigh valley area? I am also in PA an hour west of Philly. I wonder if anyone in south PA had roses that got RRD.


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RE: Charlotte vs Molineux?

Kousa,

It was about 6-7 years ago. I believe I SP'd five plants.

There was a field behind me filled with Multiflora. A new neighbor mowed it down and planted a lawn. No RRD since.

 photo RoseRosette004.jpg


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RE: Charlotte vs Molineux?

Thank you for your response. It is good to know that it is not recent. Sounds like it was contained.


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RE: Charlotte vs Molineux?

This is a hard one because they are both great roses. If I was forced to choose it would be Molineux because of the amazing blend of yellows and the stronger fragrance.

BUT Charlotte is a wonderful cultivar. For me the growth habit was larger and more graceful. The nearly smooth canes only have a few widely spaced prickles. In many respects she reminds me of Heritage. She is also one of the best repeaters among the English group. Slightly slower than Molineux but still pretty darn good. Color is a beautiful clear pastel yellow. The light fragrance is tea-like and very refreshing on a hot summer day. Speaking of fragrance, I shoved pruned Charlotte because the intensity wasn't strong enough - AND HAVE REGRETTED DOING IT EVER SINCE. She is at the top of my list should a spot ever open up in the garden. IMHO a real winner.

Here is a link that might be useful: Charlotte at HelpMeFind Roses


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RE: Charlotte vs Molineux?

  • Posted by Tessiess 9b, SoCal Inland, 12 (My Page) on
    Thu, Jul 17, 14 at 19:38

Have a look at Eurostar. It blooms a lot and has had completely clean foliage here where mildew and rust will attack any susceptible rose with gusto. Leaves are very dark green. Flowers are simply lovely, a nice chalice shape, fragrant, filled with petals and a clear lemony yellow. They will fade in the hottest part of the summer, but the plant does really well in high temps. A word of warning, this rose is armed to the teeth!!! Grows in an upright vase shape, and here stays at about 3 1/2 to maybe 4 feet tall unpruned. Blooms well even with very little fertilizer and no soil amendments. Respectably drought tolerant.

I bought mine from Eurodesert during its closing in 2011 as the beauty of the flowers and the plant attracted me. It impressed me with how well it looked during the even more scorching heat Eurodesert (really in desert so even hotter than where I am located) routinely experienced (one day in early summer I arrived in the *morning* to get roses, and I think it was already 112--by the afternoon the heat had spiked even more). In that tough environment I got to see which roses still managed to look good, living in a blast furnace! It they could take that, my place would be a piece of cake.;) I learned so much simply from looking.

Melissa


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RE: Charlotte vs Molineux?

Melissa, funny you dug up this older thread. In fact I did get a Eurostar this spring when I came across a potted one in a local nursery and I have it 'on trial' in a pot. I can certainly confirm all that you're saying from what I've seen up to now. I should also add that it has a good fragrance (the typical citrusy fragrance of many yellow HT's). It is a bit too formal and 'floribunda' looking for my taste but it would certainly look good in a bed full of them.
Nik


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