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Identify this

Posted by Thurksh 9A (My Page) on
Sun, Apr 20, 14 at 6:13

I need to know the name of this rose.

Thanks!


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Identify this

Pic of the full plant:


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RE: Identify this

Just a guess...the tea rose, Rosette Delizy?


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RE: Identify this

  • Posted by belmont NE Pennsylvania (My Page) on
    Sun, Apr 20, 14 at 8:20

It reminds me of Monsieur Tillier. Or I should say the rose I have as Monsieur Tillier.

This post was edited by belmont on Sun, Apr 20, 14 at 8:32


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RE: Identify this

Thurksh, whatever rose it is - it's truly wonderful - could you give any more information? Do you know how old the bush is, is this a recent photo, are the flowers fragrant, can you say where it's growing?

Tricia


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RE: Identify this

Rosette Delizy and Monsieur Tillier are similars but not the same color and shape.

This rose grows in Alhambra gardens, Granada (Spain) And I think that's once blooming. The age of the bush is unknow, scent? not remarkable for me.

And yes, the pic was taken a week ago or so.

I was thinking about the roses "Alchimist" or "Gloire de Dijon", but I never have seen this ones in the real, so I dont know.


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RE: Identify this

I guarantee you, the rose you've shown us is neither 'Alchymist', nor 'Gloire de Dijon'. It very closely resembles what we have in commerce in the USA as 'Mons. Tillier'.


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I think it's very similar to "Mons. Tillier", but this one, is clearly more yellow.

Here is a link that might be useful: Picture of Mons. Tillier


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Do you believe it is a tea? Could it possibly be a gigantea hybrid?


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Teas are gigantea hybrids ;-)


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To me it looks like Rosette Delizy. I think they've put that bush on steroids. It looks wonderful against the green background of the trees.

Ingrid


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No -- The form doesn't look right for Rosette Delizy. Here's Rosette Delizy in Southern California, in a fairly cool coastal climate (it heat, it would be more pastel).

I suggest that you try sending this photo to someone like Gregg Lowery of Vintage Gardens, or to John Hook, in France. OR to the wonderful Aussie ladies who wrote: "TEA ROSES: Old Roses for Warm Gardens." It could be something we in the U.S. don't have. Australia and Europe still have many things we do not.


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Thurksh, your rose looks a lot like what I know as Mons. Tillier. I see that you are located in Spain, and I think there's some confusion between Mons. Tillier and Archduke Joseph. I may have grown the opposite of what you've grown in Europe. Carol


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As I understand it our European 'Archduke Joseph' is the U.S.'s 'Monsieur Tillier'. This doesn't look quite like 'Archduke Joseph' to me: the flower is a bit too frilly and disordered....AJ is more neatly cupped in form, and not quite so, ah, vivid in its coloration, though it has that copper-pink range of tones seen in these photos. The foliage is equally clean, but (here I'm quibbling), AJ's is perhaps slightly darker. AJ has a pronounced Tea fragrance. I don't recognized this variety, but it certainly is beautiful.


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Could it be Cementina Carbonieri? Carol


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I'd vote against AJ,definitely; flower shape wrong ,and I've never seen mine with that much yellow/apricot,and there has never been that much contrast between the colour tones either. But I wouldn't say Clementina Carbobieri, either, really,since mine has never displayed those cool pink tones,and again,shows less contrast between darks and lights. However, teas do vary enormously in colour depending on weather, time or year, etc. I agree with Jeri; ask Gregg Lowery and/or John Hook for an opinion....bart


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Just a guess--and bad one I'm sure:

Mademoiselle Francisca Krüger?

MFK is mostly yellow/orange, but in cool weather it can take on those pink tones.


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Thurksh, please let us know what you discover about the identity. The rose you photographed is as enchantng as the garden in which it resides. I can almost hear Flamenco guitars. Carol


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Could it be Souvenir de Victor Hugo?

Jay


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  • Posted by luxrosa s.f california area (My Page) on
    Mon, Apr 21, 14 at 19:10

I don't know what it is, but I desire it greatly.
I would bet it's an Old Garden Tea ;
-from the way the blooms nod so prettily.
-the high number of blooms per square foot of canopy.
-size of plant, and grace of canopy says Tea to me.

I would think it would be a Tea from after 1900, it reminds me of Clementina Carbonieri' ( which I grow near Monsier Tillier and Rosette Delizy) but I do not think it is that rose, but perhaps it is a descendant of it, your rose is more vividly colored and has fewer petals and though it has a similar bloom shape the degree of angle of the back petal row is greater than Clementina Carbonieri's, I believe.

Could you possibly show us a photo of the back of a bloom?
A close up of the foliage would help as well. ;

I wish I were in Spain today...
Thanks for posting such a beautiful photo of a divine rose, it really made my day. I love Tea roses, and never loved roses at all until I saw Old Garden Tea roses in bloom.
Lux.


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Another 'no' vote for 'Clementina Carbonieri'. The flowers on mine are more cupped and have a good deal of yellow in them, a range of pink-orange-gold like a sunset. In fact the blooms on CC look like a David Austin rose with more vivid coloration.


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I tried to locate a rose list for the Alhambra gardens but couldn't. I wish public gardens listed major plants by name. Carol


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As this is in a historic garden in Spain, there is a possibility that a rose from a Spanish breeder would be used. The rose looks like a tea and 'Amando Casado' bred by Pries in 1891 matches the picture. Of course this is a wild guess and it would be good to talk to the head gardener to try to get more info concerning the history of the rose.


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  • Posted by Evenie 9b - New Orleans (My Page) on
    Fri, May 23, 14 at 17:34

I think I have seen that rose before in the antique rose garden in Louis Armstrong Park. I can't remember what it was called, but I remember that it was Italian. The next time I'm downtown, I'll go look and see. Of course, I'll bring back pictures.


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I know that Clementina Carboniera is confused with Souvenir de J B Guillot in commerce. If not one it could be the other. There could also have been tea roses bred in Spain that didn't make it to other countries. I agree it's none of the others that have been mentioned.
Jill


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Am I the only one who sees certain similarities with Le Vesuve? The substance of the leaves, and the fullness of the bush, both tell me that there's more than just 'Tea' in this wonderful rose.


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Evenie, hi! *Waiving at you from across the river in Algiers Point*

It's nice to see a fellow New Orleanian here. Unfortunately, that's all I have to say since I'm a rose newbie and wouldn't be of much help identifying for Thurksh. I agree that the rose is totally gorgeous; can't wait to see if someone figures it out. If it turns up in Armstrong Park, I will definitely have to pay it a visit. Can you believe I've never been in there?? I was just saying the other day how much I'd like to see it, so now maybe this will actually make me go.


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It kind of looks like this Harkness rose:

Here is a link that might be useful: Lady of the Mist


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Mmmm, I would be going with one of Pedro Dots pernettianas (Girona et al) - there is a distinctly modern look to this.


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I'm sorry! I never get to identify the rose, I found similar roses but not exactly the same... Endly I feel confused o_0

But lot of thanks to everybody!!!


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plan9, it's definitely not Le Vesuve, of which I have two plants. That rose is pink all the way through, with no hint of yellow or apricot tones, and it also has fewer petals. Of the roses known to me, it still looks closest to the Rosette Delizy growing in my garden, which is not to say that it couldn't be one that we haven't heard of here.

Ingrid


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